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NEWS
November 1, 2005
Alfred Tolins, a retired structural engineer and former Columbia resident, died from complications of Alzheimer's disease Saturday at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The Guilford resident was 81. Mr. Tolins was born in Philadelphia and raised there and in Brooklyn, N.Y. He earned bachelor's and master's degrees in engineering from City College of New York, and later earned a master's degree in administration from George Washington University. During World War II, Mr. Tolins enlisted in the Army and served as a rifleman under 3rd Army Gen. George S. Patton Jr. Wounded at the Battle of the Bulge, he was decorated with the Purple Heart and Bronze Star.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
M. Faysal Thameen, a retired structural engineer who headed the city's role in the 1980s construction of the Fort McHenry Tunnel, died of cancer April 9 at his home in Millbury, Mass. The former Parkville resident was 75. "He was a quiet force in the Interstate Division," said former Maryland Transportation Secretary William K. Hellmann, who was recently appointed to the state's Transportation Authority board. "He was soft-spoken, knew his business and was the key coordinator with the designers of the Fort McHenry Tunnel, which was then the largest single contract in the history of the Interstate Highway System.
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | February 13, 1993
When you're working on an old house, structural problems often come with the territory. Sometimes it's a reflection of the age of the house -- wood wears out, and even brick and stone wear down.Sometimes it's a reflection of when the house was built -- at a time of war, building supplies may not have been plentiful. Sometimes the materials just didn't exist; mass-produced structural steel wasn't around until the latter part of the 19th century.Sometimes early do-it-yourself builders simply didn't know what they were doing; and sometimes structures were put up quickly and cheaply, with no real thought for the distant future.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 2, 2011
Jerome "Jerry" Shuman, a structural engineer who designed several road bridges along Interstate 95 near Delaware, died Dec. 27 of complications from cancer and dementia at Gilchrist Hospice Center in Towson. He was 77 and lived in Pikesville. Born in Baltimore, he grew up in the Pimlico area. He attended Baltimore Polytechnic High School and Forest Park High School, graduating in 1952. Soon after, he enlisted in the U.S. Navy, serving four years aboard the USS Wasp during the Korean conflict.
NEWS
July 19, 1991
William Wesley Peters, 79, a structural engineer and architect who built Frank Lloyd Wright's most famous buildings, died yesterday at a hospital in Madison, Wis., after a stroke. He was Mr. Wright's first architectural apprentice and structural engineer for most of his famous buildings, including the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York and Fallingwater in Mill Run, Pa.Harold R. Perry, 74, the first black American consecrated as a Roman Catholic bishop in the 20th century, died yesterday in New Orleans.
NEWS
August 3, 2007
Raphael Walter Skutch, a retired structural engineer and World War II veteran, died Sunday of cancer at Brighton Gardens in Towson. He was 89. Mr. Skutch was born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville. He was a City College graduate and enlisted in the Army in 1942. Mr. Skutch served with the Army Corps of Engineers in the China-Burma-India theater and attained the rank of captain by the time of his discharge in 1946. After the war, he went to work as a structural engineer for the White Roofing Co. in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2002
Dear Mr. Azrael, I have owned my 42-year-old home in Timonium for seven years and rented it for one year before owning it. The elderly couple who owned the home were very religious and trustworthy, so I thought. Their brother, a real estate agent, was directly involved in the sale to me. The house had some evidence of a structural problem when I moved in, and prior to actually purchasing it, I insisted that the sellers have a structural engineer provide a report that the house was no longer settling.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | November 16, 1990
Orange condemnation signs remained on the doors of four homes in Upton following yesterday's cave-in of two vacant houses owned by a developer who failed to heed the city's advice and obtain drawings from a structural engineer.He also apparently exceeded the limit of his reconstruction permit.Meanwhile, two of five people who were injured when the houses collapsed remained hospitalized.Between 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. yesterday, the rear portions of the roofs caved in on two, three-story corner homes, in the 500 block of McMechen St. The bricks crumbled onto the additions of two adjacent properties, and wiped out their kitchens, said Zack Germroth, a spokesman for the Department of Housing and Community Development.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | January 10, 2010
Robert W. "Bob" Parrott, a World War II Navy veteran who later worked as an engineer and estimator, died of cancer Dec. 27 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Ednor Gardens resident was 92. Mr. Parrott, the son of a structural engineer and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. He was a 1936 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and studied engineering and aircraft design at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland, College Park. During the late 1930s and early '40s, he worked with his father at Dietrich Brothers, a steel fabricator, and then joined the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River.
NEWS
By Staff Report | December 29, 1992
Charles Frederick Millard, who worked as a project engineer for Whitman Requardt and Associates, died Dec. 20 of cardiac arrest at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 75.Born in Dunmore, Pa., in 1917, he earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from Bucknell University in 1940.During World War II, he served with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the European and Asian theaters. After the war, he worked for the Corps of Engineers, the East Bay Municipal Utilities District in Oakland, Calif.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | January 10, 2010
Robert W. "Bob" Parrott, a World War II Navy veteran who later worked as an engineer and estimator, died of cancer Dec. 27 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Ednor Gardens resident was 92. Mr. Parrott, the son of a structural engineer and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. He was a 1936 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and studied engineering and aircraft design at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland, College Park. During the late 1930s and early '40s, he worked with his father at Dietrich Brothers, a steel fabricator, and then joined the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River.
NEWS
August 3, 2007
Raphael Walter Skutch, a retired structural engineer and World War II veteran, died Sunday of cancer at Brighton Gardens in Towson. He was 89. Mr. Skutch was born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville. He was a City College graduate and enlisted in the Army in 1942. Mr. Skutch served with the Army Corps of Engineers in the China-Burma-India theater and attained the rank of captain by the time of his discharge in 1946. After the war, he went to work as a structural engineer for the White Roofing Co. in Baltimore.
NEWS
January 26, 2007
Daniel Martin Pearce, a retired structural engineer, died of heart failure Saturday at Oak Crest Village in Parkville. The former Towson resident was 84. Mr. Pearce was born in Baltimore and raised in Sparks. He was a 1939 graduate of the old Sparks High School and earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from Swarthmore College in 1943. During World War II, he enlisted in the Army Air Forces and was trained as a B-29 gunner. He attained the rank of lieutenant. After the war, he worked as a mechanical engineer at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River.
NEWS
November 1, 2005
Alfred Tolins, a retired structural engineer and former Columbia resident, died from complications of Alzheimer's disease Saturday at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The Guilford resident was 81. Mr. Tolins was born in Philadelphia and raised there and in Brooklyn, N.Y. He earned bachelor's and master's degrees in engineering from City College of New York, and later earned a master's degree in administration from George Washington University. During World War II, Mr. Tolins enlisted in the Army and served as a rifleman under 3rd Army Gen. George S. Patton Jr. Wounded at the Battle of the Bulge, he was decorated with the Purple Heart and Bronze Star.
NEWS
By James Glanz and Eric Lipton and James Glanz and Eric Lipton,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 22, 2002
NEW YORK - Since Sept. 11, the owners of signature skyscrapers have been trying to find ways to calm jittery tenants and make the buildings more durable if catastrophe strikes. Perhaps nowhere has anyone thought longer and harder about that challenge than at Citigroup Center, the 59-story tower on East 53rd Street in Manhattan with the distinctive triangular top and a troubled history involving secretive structural repairs, which were begun 24 years ago to keep the building from toppling in hurricane-force winds.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2002
Dear Mr. Azrael, I have owned my 42-year-old home in Timonium for seven years and rented it for one year before owning it. The elderly couple who owned the home were very religious and trustworthy, so I thought. Their brother, a real estate agent, was directly involved in the sale to me. The house had some evidence of a structural problem when I moved in, and prior to actually purchasing it, I insisted that the sellers have a structural engineer provide a report that the house was no longer settling.
NEWS
By Ronnie Greene and John B. O'Donnell and Ronnie Greene and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1997
Submitting to a rare self-inspection, Baltimore officials formally initiated a review yesterday of their technique for toppling middle-of-the-block rowhouses.As the city hired a consultant to examine its demolition procedures, experts interviewed by The Sun raised fundamental questions about the city's razings of aged rowhouses between other aged rowhouses -- all locked together by bricks, mortar and lumber that often date to the last century."Before you tear down a midblock house, you ought to be doing some very serious engineering to make sure the walls are going to stand," said Randy Johnson, a home improvement contractor who began renovating Baltimore rowhouses 20 years ago.Added Tim Sibol, a structural engineer in Baltimore: "The first thing you need to do is go in and make sure you know what you've got before you start."
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