Advertisement
HomeCollectionsStronger
IN THE NEWS

Stronger

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Newsday | March 5, 1993
NEW YORK -- In her first interview since she was released from prison seven weeks ago, Jean Harris said her 12 years in jail gave her a strength she had never had before."
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
As the Ravens prepared to host the Pittsburgh Steelers on Thursday night, activists and political leaders continued to question the NFL over the investigation of the team's former running back, Ray Rice, and its stance against domestic violence. Even as the NFL announced a review of its efforts to obtain video footage of Rice striking his then-fiancee, critics assailed the league's choice of former FBI director Robert S. Mueller as an investigator, citing potential conflicts of interest.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 5, 1997
Trusted Information Systems Inc. said yesterday that the U.S. government has agreed to allow the export of stronger encryption software than ever before, as long as the encryption is packaged with the company's technology to recover encrypted files in an emergency.Since 1993, the federal government has refused to allow export of most strong encryption products, fearing terrorists or international criminals might abuse encryption to communicate worldwide without fear of law enforcement.Citing that fear, U.S. officials until recently allowed export only of relatively simple encryption systems using short algorithmic "keys" that critics believed could be deciphered too easily.
SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | August 24, 2014
COLLEGE PARK -- L.A. Goree was small enough as a freshman at Maryland in 2010 that former Terps coach Ralph Friedgen asked Goree to switch from linebacker to safety. Goree was a contributor for Maryland even while lacking prototypical size. But he is bigger and stronger than he has ever been as he enters his senior season. After weighing just 205 pounds as a freshman, the 6-foot-2 Goree began preseason camp earlier this month weighing 245 pounds. Goree increased his weight to 235 pounds heading into last year and put on 17 pounds this offseason after finishing last year weighing 228. “I've never been 245 in my life,” said Goree, a Bowie native who played at C.H. Flowers High School.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 16, 1994
NEW YORK -- R. H. Macy & Co. reported markedly stronger second-quarter earnings yesterday, building up its ammunition as it prepares to bargain with creditors over a plan to emerge from bankruptcy.Citing better profit margins and strict cost controls, the company said profits soared to $60.4 million in the quarter that ended Jan. 29, compared with $8.9 million in the corresponding period a year ago.During the quarter, Macy eliminated about $68 million of expenses. The savings were evident in the increase in its earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization.
SPORTS
By EDWARD LEE | December 10, 2008
You've battled epilepsy, endured the passing of your father, Harry, and undergone neck surgery during the past year. How do you persevere? Strength, I guess. Having epilepsy hurt me, but it made me stronger. I didn't know what was wrong with me, and everything just snowballed. But it made me stronger. With my dad dying and us being able to spend those last days together, I truly believe that in everything, there is a plan. With all the rough times you've overcome, is there a point at which you begin to contemplate retirement?
NEWS
May 26, 1996
BALTIMORE'S STANDING as a college town owes much to the eminence of Goucher College among small liberal arts institutions that give undivided attention to the complete education of undergraduates. Anything that helps Goucher grow stronger, do its job better and face the future with more confidence is good for all of Central Maryland as a center of learning.The Campaign for Goucher College, now on its way to increasing the endowment $40 million by June 1999 (it is $93 million today), will provide stronger foundations for the college now numbering 1,050 full-time undergraduates and 200 graduate students on 285 forested acres just north of Towson's shopping district.
NEWS
July 18, 2001
U.S. NEWSPAPERS are better and stronger because of what Katharine M. Graham did at the Washington Post. Her death at 84 deprives the industry of a giant. The core of her achievement was in three gut-wrenching, high-risk decisions made from 1971 to 1975. In the first, she agreed over legal advice that the Post would print the Pentagon Papers, prepared from government documents detailing U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War, after the New York Times was enjoined from doing so. Other papers followed, and the precedent of prior censorship was undone.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2000
State and federal leaders plan to commit themselves today to adding 46,000 acres of underwater grasses to the Chesapeake Bay within five years, increasing by tenfold the oyster population and cleansing the water enough to remove the bay and its tidal tributaries from the Environmental Protection Agency's list of "impaired waters." Chesapeake 2000, the carefully worded bay restoration agreement, is scheduled to be signed today by the governors of Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania, the mayor of the District of Columbia and EPA administrator Carol M. Browner.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 8, 1995
Newt Gingrich has been called many things, but one of them is not a friend of public television.Last December, the House Speaker called for Congress to "zero out" funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Things looked pretty bleak for Big Bird and the gang as a fierce national debate on the very existence of public television ensued.The debate hasn't totally ended, but the picture at PBS has brightened considerably. Gingrich has backed off in the wake of several public opinion polls showing widespread support for public television.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
When Brian Stewart accused a local fraternity chapter at Morgan State University of discriminating against him for being gay late last year, the university stressed its commitment to diversity and began investigating. The two results, Stewart said this week, were that the Alpha Iota chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi was placed on probation for breaking university discrimination policies, and Stewart became an even bigger target of harassment  on the school's Baltimore campus. "I had figures - hidden by the shadows of a campus residence hall and the night sky -- yell threats to me intentionally calling me a [gay slur]
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | June 6, 2014
The case can be made that there is a lot more riding on California Chrome than a 100-pound jockey and a chance to be mentioned in the same conversation with the greatest thoroughbreds of all time. The case can be made that when Chrome bursts out of the starting gate at Belmont Park on Saturday, he'll be carrying the weight of the horse racing world on his chestnut shoulders. He won't just be chasing history. He won't just be trying to end a 36-year Triple Crown drought, though that's the main headline.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Hall of Famer Brooks Robinson has been through a lot over the past several years, but he clearly hasn't lost his sense of humor. During a question-and-answer session before joining NBC Sports broadcaster Bob Costas for a fundraiser at Caves Valley Golf Club in Owings Mills to benefit the Casey Cares Foundation on Friday night, the legendary third baseman was asked whether there was one play during his career that he wished had been subject to...
NEWS
By Steve Phillips | March 20, 2014
President Barack Obama came into office promising to limit United States commitments abroad in order to focus on the economy and health care at home. Such an approach may have been prudent immediately after the excesses of the Bush administration, but strong measures are needed now to confront the crisis in Ukraine. During the past few weeks, political instability in Ukraine led to the resignation and flight of the pro-Russian president. Russia responded by invading part of Ukraine, Crimea, then engineering a vote for independence in that region.
NEWS
By John F. Gossart Jr and By John F. Gossart Jr | March 12, 2014
It remains to be seen whether the United States Congress can muster the responsibility and will to do what is right and achieve comprehensive immigration reform this year. Republican leadership in the House of Representatives continues to hold immigration reform hostage, most recently justifying inaction by blaming President Obama's alleged track record on failing to enforce our immigration laws. Perhaps those in Congress should come and sit inside the many immigration courtrooms throughout the country for a fact check on this unfounded assertion.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Child care workers would undergo stiffer background checks and states would spend more to improve the quality of day care under a sweeping, bipartisan bill crafted by Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski that is set for a vote in the Senate as early as this week. The legislation, which has broad support in the Senate, would impose a wide range of safety requirements on day care providers, from annual inspections of facilities to CPR training for staff. The measure would also require states to set aside millions more than they do now to improve the care young children receive.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun reporter | August 23, 2008
COLLEGE PARK - For most of Da'Rel Scott's first two years with the Maryland football team, there were more rumors about his ability than public sightings. Then came the North Carolina State game late last season. In a 37-0 victory over the Wolfpack in Raleigh that made the Terps bowl-eligible, Scott ran for 89 yards on eight carries. Knowing that Lance Ball and Keon Lattimore were seniors, Maryland coach Ralph Friedgen and the fans were given something to think about for this season. It also reinforced what Scott, a sophomore, thought could happen all along if he was given the opportunity to be a featured back.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner and Stacey Hirsh and Andrew Ratner and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2001
Microsoft Corp., believed to have dodged the federal antitrust suit that many thought would shatter it, is by various measures a stronger force now than three years ago when the case began. Its stock is climbing, competitors are struggling and the industry as a whole appears to be relying on the company to resuscitate sales of personal computers. While observers in the computer, financial and legal fields disagreed yesterday on whether Microsoft emerges unscathed from the lawsuit, most agree that the company has demonstrated a resilience that's rare in the business of technology.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 28, 2014
In the already tiresome guessing game of whether or not Hillary Clinton will run for president in 2016, there's a wide assumption among Democrats that the nomination is hers for the asking. One apparent rationale is that the party has no one else to turn to who has comparable national recognition or appeal. The assumption is somewhat predicated on an expectation that Vice President Joe Biden would step aside, either out of a conviction that he could not beat her in primary competition or that his public image is so tattered as to render his nomination inconceivable.
NEWS
January 23, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley's first State of the State address, delivered seven years ago, gave little hint of the sweeping changes that would take place in Maryland by the time he returned to the House of Delegates' rostrum today for his final such speech. The main take-away of that speech in 2007 was the new governor's promise to restore cooperation and civility in a state capital that had seen notable deficits of both during the period of divided government ushered in by his predecessor, Republican Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. After watching the legislature give Mr. O'Malley everything he wanted for seven years, and vice versa, that concern seems quaint.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.