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By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 6, 2002
WASHINGTON - Waving from his wheelchair as if in a convertible at a parade, Strom Thurmond, the longest-serving and oldest senator ever, celebrated his 100th birthday at a Capitol Hill bash yesterday, topping off a career as remarkable for its length as for its role in political history. Hundreds of friends, relatives and staff aides past and present made their way to a Capitol Hill blanketed with snow to celebrate at a private party in the Senate's Dirksen office building. The frail centenarian - whose transformation from a leading segregationist Democrat to conservative Republican tracked a broader shift in the South and the nation - was given a giant American-flag cake bearing 100 red, white and blue candles.
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FEATURES
By TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | December 11, 2007
WITH THE exception of reigning sovereigns (including the pope), presidents and cardinals, introductions made between strangers abide by these rules: Youth is introduced to age - `Strom Thurmond, may I present Doogie Howser?' Men are introduced to women - `Dame Edna, this is Count Victor Grezhinski.' Lower ranks are introduced to higher - `Colonel Sanders, this is Sgt. Bilko.' Individuals are introduced to groups - `Mickey Mouse Club, this is Britney Spears.'" Such tongue-in-cheek witty info is from the new and delightful Schott's Miscellany almanac for 2008, by Ben Schott.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 27, 2003
WASHINGTON - Former Sen. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina, a one-time Democratic segregationist who helped fuel the rise of the modern conservative Republican Party in the South, died last night, his family announced. He was 100 and had been the longest-serving senator in history. Mr. Thurmond, whose physical and political endurance were legendary - he holds the record for solo Senate filibustering - retired on Jan. 5 after more than 48 years in office. Last night in the U.S. Senate, lawmakers working feverishly on proposed Medicare expansion stopped their work for a moment of silence in Mr. Thurmond's honor.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 28, 2005
WASHINGTON - After Sen. Trent Lott was deposed as the Republican leader in December 2002 because of a racially charged remark, he slipped into the background, quietly rebuilding his power and career. But Lott is quiet no more, with a new memoir and an accompanying national book tour in which he is providing a behind-the-scenes view of his more than 30 years representing Mississippi in Congress and his admittedly inept handling of a furor that began with words of praise for Sen. Strom Thurmond at his 100th birthday party.
NEWS
By Martin D. Tullai and Martin D. Tullai,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 19, 2002
Columnist William Safire has written that a blooper is an "exploitable mistake," which is worse than a goof, equivalent to a gaffe, but not as serious as a blunder. By this standard, Sen. Trent Lott's unwise and inappropriate statement at Sen. Strom Thurmond's 100th birthday party was an egregious blunder. This was the widely publicized comment by Lott that the country would have been better off if Thurmond had been elected president in 1948 when he ran on the Dixiecrat ticket. Thurmond's platform was continued racial segregation.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The oldest living United States Senator opens the session of the world's greatest deliberative body with two raps of his white gavel. "The Senate is now in session," twangs Strom Thurmond, the president pror everybody, a "How'ya doin'" here, a "Mighty glad to see ya" there, a pat on the back, a firm grip on the upper arm. His gait is gingerly, disjointed, as if he's not sure all the parts will hold together.The only business at hand on this day is the annual reading of George Washington's farewell address.
NEWS
December 20, 2002
In recent days, the 1948 Democratic convention has entered the national consciousness, thanks to Trent Lott, Republican senator from Mississippi. Segregation was the defining issue in 1948. President Harry S. Truman was becoming a supporter of civil rights, at a time when the armed forces were segregated and blacks were prevented from voting in many states. In July, at the convention in Philadelphia, Southerners were fighting for segregation by insisting that matters of civil rights should be left to the states.
NEWS
February 13, 1995
John E. Lockard of Finksburg joined representatives from across the United States and Europe at the annual midwinter conference of the Reserve Officers Association Jan. 22 to Jan. 25 in Washington.A retired colonel in the U.S. Army, Mr. Lockard helped make decisions about Reserve Officers Association programs and projects and took part in discussions of legislative strategies related to national security.More than 1,200 people attended the conference.Speakers included Rep. Ike Skelton, a Missouri Democrat, and Sen. Strom Thurmond, a South Carolina Republican.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 9, 1995
ON HEARING that the Washington chapter of the National Urban League was planning to honor Sen. Strom Thurmond, Kweisi Mfume said he asked himself, "if this was the same Strom Thurmond I grew up with in this country."The obvious answer is, "Everybody grew up with this Strom Thurmond!" He has been in the public eye (and on the public payroll) since the year Bob Dole was born, 1923.In the year Representative Mfume was born, 1948, Senator Thurmond ran for president as a "Dixiecrat." He and other Southerners walked out on the Democratic Party to protest the platform's civil rights plank.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A storm of outrage has descended on the Washington chapter of the National Urban League because it has invited Sen. Strom Thurmond, a determined foe of civil rights legislation, to tonight's dinner honoring friendships between blacks and whites.Many African-Americans want to know why this old-line civil rights organization, founded in 1911 to serve the social and economic needs of blacks, has invited Mr. Thurmond. The dinner is held each year in memory of Whitney M. Young Jr., who was president of the National Urban League from 1961 to 1971.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 18, 2003
COLUMBIA, S.C. - The daughter of a one-time segregationist senator - born to his 16-year-old African-American maid when he was 22 - claimed her place among his children and in the nation's troubled history of race yesterday. Essie Mae Washington-Williams, 78, said she decided to speak about being the daughter of Sen. Strom Thurmond, who died this year at age 100, not out of bitterness but to help her children understand their past. "In fact, there is a great sense of peace that has come over me in the past year," she said at a news conference.
TOPIC
By David Shaw and David Shaw,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 30, 2003
Now that the flap over Howard Dean's bonehead comment about Confederate flags and pickup trucks temporarily has abated, it might be a good time for the media to reconsider their seasonal obsession with what I've come to think of as the "gotcha gaffe." Every time someone in public life - usually but not necessarily a politician - says something stupid or ill-considered, especially in the course of a campaign, the media jump on him as if they'd just caught Adolf Hitler goose-stepping out of Berchtesgaden, snarling, "Let's kill all the Jews."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 27, 2003
WASHINGTON - Former Sen. Strom Thurmond of South Carolina, a one-time Democratic segregationist who helped fuel the rise of the modern conservative Republican Party in the South, died last night, his family announced. He was 100 and had been the longest-serving senator in history. Mr. Thurmond, whose physical and political endurance were legendary - he holds the record for solo Senate filibustering - retired on Jan. 5 after more than 48 years in office. Last night in the U.S. Senate, lawmakers working feverishly on proposed Medicare expansion stopped their work for a moment of silence in Mr. Thurmond's honor.
NEWS
December 20, 2002
In recent days, the 1948 Democratic convention has entered the national consciousness, thanks to Trent Lott, Republican senator from Mississippi. Segregation was the defining issue in 1948. President Harry S. Truman was becoming a supporter of civil rights, at a time when the armed forces were segregated and blacks were prevented from voting in many states. In July, at the convention in Philadelphia, Southerners were fighting for segregation by insisting that matters of civil rights should be left to the states.
NEWS
By Martin D. Tullai and Martin D. Tullai,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 19, 2002
Columnist William Safire has written that a blooper is an "exploitable mistake," which is worse than a goof, equivalent to a gaffe, but not as serious as a blunder. By this standard, Sen. Trent Lott's unwise and inappropriate statement at Sen. Strom Thurmond's 100th birthday party was an egregious blunder. This was the widely publicized comment by Lott that the country would have been better off if Thurmond had been elected president in 1948 when he ran on the Dixiecrat ticket. Thurmond's platform was continued racial segregation.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | December 16, 2002
WASHINGTON - First, let's establish what the Trent Lott imbroglio is not. This is not just another case of liberals attempting to smear a good conservative as a racist just because he happens to oppose any of the left's pet positions on racial preferences or immigration. Nor is this a case of taking a trifling comment out of context and inflating it into something totally different, as liberals have done thousands of times. No, what makes this case so galling is that it places the race-baiters, the wielders of the ready smear and the professional offense-takers in the right for once.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 16, 2002
BOSTON - There's a certain justice in the fact that Trent Lott got into this passel of trouble by attending a birthday party. Not just anybody's birthday, mind you, but Strom Thurmond's 100th celebration. Before Mr. Lott lauded the old Dixiecrat as the Man Who Should Have Been President, he was all set to lead the Senate. More astonishingly, Strom Thurmond was about to roll out of the public spotlight with no more controversial epitaph than the last words he uttered on the Senate floor: "That's all."
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 16, 2002
BOSTON - There's a certain justice in the fact that Trent Lott got into this passel of trouble by attending a birthday party. Not just anybody's birthday, mind you, but Strom Thurmond's 100th celebration. Before Mr. Lott lauded the old Dixiecrat as the Man Who Should Have Been President, he was all set to lead the Senate. More astonishingly, Strom Thurmond was about to roll out of the public spotlight with no more controversial epitaph than the last words he uttered on the Senate floor: "That's all."
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