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NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | October 27, 1994
James W. Rouse, Columbia's developer and founder of a national affordable housing foundation, was released from Howard County General Hospital yesterday, five days after suffering what he called a "very minor stroke."Mr. Rouse, 80, expects to recuperate for the next two weeks before resuming his work schedule as founder-chairman of The Enterprise Foundation, said officials at the nonprofit housing organization."I'm doing fine. I'm in good shape," Mr. Rouse said from his home yesterday in Columbia's Wilde Lake village.
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SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 4, 2005
Brendan McKinney, making his first major challenge at the top spot in the Maryland Amateur Stroke Play championship, shot 1-under-par 70 at Mount Pleasant Golf Course yesterday to grab the 36-hole lead at 139. First-round leader Kirk Lombardi came back to the field with a 73 and is tied at 140 with recent Towson University graduate Chris Baloga, who shot 71 in the second round. Phil Fairbanks, third last year, used a share of the day's low round, 69, for a two-round total of 141, followed by Moose Brown and Spring Publinx winner Ki Moon at 142. Brian Woods also shot 69 and is at 143, tied with Larry Storck and Wilbert Lynn III. There were only four rounds below par during the day, and 11 players are within five strokes of the lead.
SPORTS
December 27, 1991
Hall of Famer Ted Williams suffered a minor stroke recently but is recovering nicely at his Florida home, friends said yesterday."In a general conversation I had with him yesterday, he said he had a little stroke," said a friend who asked not to be identified. "I asked him what the results were. He said, 'It didn't amount to anything.' ""He said he was going to have some treatment where they would open the artery. He had a clogged artery. He wasn't concerned about it at all. Apparently he had no effect from it."
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | September 17, 2009
The doctor who saw me in the ER wrote in her report: "nice 67 y.o. male, flat affect, awake, alert and appropriate." I had appeared with slurred speech and a balloon in my head, had driven myself to United Hospital in St. Paul, parked in No Parking, walked in and was triaged right in to a neurologist who trundled me into the MRI Space-Time Cyclotron for 50 minutes of banging and whanging which produced a picture of the stroke in the front of my brain, so...
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
Earlier this month a Texas Rangers sportscaster went from calling live highlights of a baseball game to talking about a botched robbery. The sportscaster's incoherent switch confused listeners, but doctors saw the symptoms of aphasia, a disease not known to many but which affects 1 million people. It is more common than Parkinson's disease, cerebral palsy or muscular dystrophy, according to the National Aphasia Association. The disorder weakens the expression and understanding of spoken language, making it difficult for someone to read, write and say what they mean.
FEATURES
By Jennifer E. Mabry and Jennifer E. Mabry,Sun Staff | February 15, 1998
Andre Braugher, who portrays Detective Frank Pembleton on television's popular police drama "Homicide," was honored by the Maryland Heart Association at its annual Heart Ball at the Hyatt Regency Baltimore. The reason? His realistic and compelling portrayal of a stroke survivor.Braugher told me: "I'm glad the portrayal has had a positive effect, and given broader understanding to the effects of stroke -- especially among African-Americans."Among the 750 attendees at the gala, which had as its theme Monte Carlo's Grand Prix, were Brian King, chairman of the board of the Maryland Affiliate of the American Heart Association, and his wife, Anne Lynn King; and ball co-chairs Chris Thomson, executive director of St. Joseph Medical Center; Dr. Judy A. Reitz, senior vice president of operations at Johns Hopkins Hospital; Bill Balke, a Hopkins cardiologist, and his wife, Denise Quandt, vice president of provider relations at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2005
Women with migraines that cause vision changes are more likely to suffer a stroke than those without a history of the severe headaches, researchers reported yesterday. Scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta found that women whose migraines were accompanied by vision loss had a 70 percent greater risk of stroke than women who don't get migraines. Women who saw lines or spots shortly before or during their migraines had a 25 percent increased risk.
SPORTS
June 25, 1991
Jim Estes, first-year assistant professional at Bonnie View Country Club, shot 70-67137 and breezed to the assistants championship of the Middle Atlantic PGA-Northern Chapter at the Suburban Club yesterday.Estes had a five-stroke margin on the rest of the 74-man field There was a three-way tie for second at 142 among Marty Ries of Suburban, Jeff Dayton, The Bay Club, and Mark Spolarich, Crofton.Fran Rhoads of Holly Hills took an early lead, turning the morning nine in 35, and was joined by Estes and Spolarich at the halfway lead, 70. An afternoon front nine of 1-under-par 34 boosted him to a two-stroke lead.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | September 29, 1996
DR. MARIAN LAMONTE, director of the University of Maryland Medical Center's new Brain Attack Team, knows the frustration of living between the cutting edge of medical knowledge and the need to spread the word.The calls come in from hospitals in the area, describing a person who has come in with stroke symptoms and asking whether the team can help. Too often it turns out that the call comes after those crucial hours when new therapies can make a huge difference in a patient's ability to recover -- leaving Dr. LaMonte to wonder how much better that person's quality of life would have been had help come sooner.
SPORTS
By Marty Knack and Marty Knack,Special to The Sun | August 24, 1991
EDMONTON, Alberta -- Anita Nall couldn't keep pace with the world champion or her American teammate.The 15-year-old sensation from Towson came into the fifth Pan Pacific swimming championships ranked sixth in the world in the women's 100-meter breast stroke.But Linley Frame of Australia showed last night that her world championship in January was no fluke, despite spending three months on crutches after an April car accident.Frame repeated her success from Perth, Australia seven months ago when she touched in 1 minute, 9.98 seconds.
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