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NEWS
September 7, 2010
Charley Hoffman fired a 9-under 62 Monday to roll to a five-stroke victory at the Deutsche Bank Championship, the second of four FedEx Cup playoff events. Hoffman missed the course record at the TPC Boston in Norton, Mass., by a stroke but matched the event's scoring record of 22-under 262. "I actually didn't know how many birdies I had today," said Hoffman, who earned $1.35 million for his second PGA Tour victory. "The ball just kept going in the hole, and the few bad shots I hit, I got away with.
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SPORTS
Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
The Aug. 10 workout at which Morgan State football player Marquese Meadow fell ill was a one-hour, non-contact session geared toward conditioning, a university spokesman said Wednesday. Meadow, a freshman on the Bears' football team, died Sunday of heat stroke after spending two weeks in the hospital. Morgan State spokesman Clint Coleman reiterated Wednesday that the school believes all proper procedures were followed by the coaching staff and athletic trainers. He said Meadow was attended to by a trainer after becoming disoriented toward the end of the Aug. 10 session, during which players were not in pads.
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FEATURES
December 24, 2009
Bishop John H. Ricard, who served 13 years in the Archdiocese of Baltimore, is alert and resting comfortably after suffering a stroke Tuesday, according to the Diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee. The 69-year-old bishop was upgraded from critical to serious condition at Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola, where he was admitted with symptoms of a stroke, according to the diocese. A CT scan confirmed the stroke. Ricard was a popular auxilliary bishop in Baltimore from 1984 until 1997, when he was named by Pope John Paul II to head the Pensacola-Tallahassee diocese.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Autopsy results showing that Morgan State University football player Marquese Meadow died of heat stroke have prompted his mother to question whether coaches and trainers monitored the heat at practice or gave players enough water breaks. Meadow, an 18-year-old freshman from Washington, D.C., died early Sunday after being hospitalized for two weeks. School officials said he became disoriented after an Aug. 10 football practice. His death has been ruled accidental, said Bruce Goldfarb, spokesman for the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2011
Working late into the night at a research center at the South Pole, Renee-Nicole Douceur thought she was just tired when her vision suddenly became blurred. Sleep did nothing to improve her eyesight, and a doctor at the center at first thought she had torn a retina. But further diagnosis pointed to a stroke and the beginning of an ordeal where the closest hospital would be nine weeks and a 12-hour plane ride away. "I was very concerned for my health," Douceur said Friday. "I didn't know if I was a ticking time bomb.
SPORTS
By Lisa Dillman and Lisa Dillman,Trbune Newspapers | July 28, 2009
ROME - -The Great Stroke Experiment is over. By mutual decision, Michael Phelps and his coach, Bob Bowman, are putting that relatively new windmill, straight-arm stroke - designed for sprinting - right back on the shelf. "It actually was [mutual]. It's funny, as often happens, he came out and said the same thing," Bowman said this morning at the world championships. "He said, 'I don't think this is working.' I said, 'You're right.' Experiment failed. Next." The Baltimore swimmer told Bowman that on Sunday night, almost immediately after his opening leg in the winning 400-meter freestyle relay.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2012
The research involved laser scans, underwater video and special animation software. And it took thousands of hours of computer time to run simulations that crunched complex fluid mechanics equations. All of this scientific firepower was thrown at one question: Which freestyle swimming stroke is superior: the paddle-like motion known as "deep catch," or the propeller action called sculling? The answer: It's the deep catch, in which a swimmer's hands push water straight back toward his or her feet.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | July 5, 1998
James Castagna shot even par for two days to capture the lead at 142, one stroke ahead of Wes Lovell and Mitch Wyant in the Maryland Amateur Stroke Play at Mount Pleasant Golf Course.Wyant recorded yesterday's low round, a 3-under-par 68.Keith Janecek, the first-round leader, fell into a two-way tie for third at 144 with Kirk Lombardi.Pub Date: 7/05/98
SPORTS
By Lori Van Lonkhuyzen and Lori Van Lonkhuyzen,Sun Staff Writer | July 4, 1994
Slow greens and a half-hour rain delay hindered the participants in yesterday's final round of the Maryland Amateur Stroke Play Championship at Mount Pleasant Golf Course, but Buddy Peoples was able to shoot a 4-under-par 67 to win the title and set a tournament record .Peoples (Crofton Country Club), who won the title in 1992, finished with a three-day total of 210 -- the first below-par combined score in the history of the tournament.What is shocking is that he accomplished that score under some tough conditions.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | May 31, 1995
It's not that Lee Elder approaches golfers on the practice tee and dares to bore them with details of his heart attack . . . but maybe he should. The message is more important than correcting a swing flaw or making a change in equipment.Elder didn't recognize the symptoms of his health problem. It wasn't until he collapsed on the floor of his bedroom in Pompano Beach, Fla., believing he was paralyzed and making a desperate phone call to his condominium neighbors that he realized he was in serious trouble.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Laurel A. Oleynick, a former X-ray technician and longtime volunteer, died Tuesday of complications from a stroke at the Loch Raven VA Community Living & Rehabilitation Center in Northeast Baltimore. She was 82. The daughter of Byron Coggins, a postal worker, and Estelle Coggins, a homemaker, Laurel Adele Coggins was born and raised on Nantucket. After graduating from Nantucket High School in 1949, she enlisted in the Air Force and served for seven years as a technician with the Strategic Air Command.
NEWS
April 17, 2014
This week, Michael R. Bloomberg announced he would be writing a check to support a grass-roots get-out-the-vote effort to counteract the National Rifle Association. This is hardly a shock as Mr. Bloomberg has supported the fight against gun violence before, but the amount involved was eye-opening — $50 million. This invites two initial realizations. First, that one of the nation's richest men can casually write a check the size of a lotto jackpot as others might pluck a few cans for the neighborhood food drive, and second, that we live in an age of dueling oligarchs (take that, Koch brothers)
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
When Raissa Howera was growing up in the Washington area, she took part in protests supporting independence for Ukraine, the land of her father's family. Such activism was typical, she said. Her adolescence was marked by frustration with the problems that trouble the world and a sense of helplessness to change it. Now, as an art teacher at Oakland Mills Middle School in Columbia, Howera inspires students' creativity with social justice and outreach projects. This year, her students are taking part in projects such as Empty Bowls, an anti-hunger initiative by the North Carolina-based nonprofit Imagine/RENDER Group.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
A Baltimore man was sentenced to 27 years in prison for a 2009 armed robbery at a Baltimore business that resulted in the owner's death. Pedro Rodriguez Garcia, 35, formerly of Rosedale, robbed Constantine Frank at gunpoint, taking more than $11,000, inside Precision Vending on S. Lakewood Avenue on July 29, 2009, according to court documents. The robbery was planned by Nikolaos Mamalis, 56, of Edgewood, according to evidence presented at the trial. Garcia and Daniel Chase, 67, of New Jersey, entered the store posing as package delivery men, pointed a gun at Frank, tied him up and robbed him, court documents said.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 24, 2013
  The Johns Hopkins Hospital has become the first in Maryland to have its stroke center given special designation as a comprehensive stroke center by The Joint Commission accreditation agency.  The designation recognizes Johns Hopkins as a hospital that provides highly specialized stroke care with the equipment, staff and training to treat patients with the most complex strokes. The hospital is also the first in Maryland to earn the same designation from the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems, which oversees emergency services in the state.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | July 17, 2013
Most Marylanders say people in the United States are already being harmed by climate change, a new poll finds. In a statewide mail survey of 2,100 households, the poll by George Mason University's Center for Climate Change Communication found that 52 percent of Marylanders see evidence that climate change is hurting Americans. That's a stronger view than is held by Americans generally, it seems. Only 34 percent of those asked nationwide said they believed climate change was already harming people in this country, according to the pollsters.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton recently received a gag gift of protective headgear after she suffered a concussion and blood clot near her brain after a fall. While Clinton can now make light of the injuries, a blood clot can be a serious health risk that can lead to death. Dr. James L. Frazier, III, a neurosurgeon at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, talks about the dangers. What causes a blood clot to form in the brain? A blood clot or thrombus can form in the arteries that supply blood to the brain.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart | June 16, 1996
Defending champion Charlie Narciso shot a 1-over-par, 37-3572 yesterday to take a one-stroke lead halfway through the annual Spring Publinx tournament at Mount Pleasant Golf Course.The Baltimore Municipal Golf Corporation event drew 172 starters.Narciso, who offset a double bogey on the opening hole with birdies on the next two, turned at 1-over par, then bogeyed the 10th and birdied the 14th to match par for that side.Walt Grabowski, a former Publinx titlist, finished 37-3673, followed by Serge Hogg, last year's Maryland Amateur Stroke Play champion, and Douglas McIlvain at 74.The final round will be played today at Forest Park GC.Pub Date: 6/16/96
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2013
One night in 1999, a rash of frightening sensations hit Paul Titus all at once. His left arm went numb. His left eye began twitching. He couldn't speak without slurring. Unaware what the symptoms meant, he was slow to call for help. When his ischemic stroke was finally over, he was paralyzed on his left side and for 14 years he needed a leg brace and cane just to stay upright. One morning last week, Titus smiled as he loped along on a treadmill in a makeshift gym. A high-tech, brace-like device wrapped his left ankle, monitoring his gait 200 times per second and supplying energy boosts as needed.
SPORTS
April 13, 2013
How some of our columnists and editors feel about the two-stroke penalty given to Tiger Woods at the Masters Saturday: Peter Schmuck, columnist: By most accounts, the ruling was correct and penalty appropriate, which is a sign that professional golf has evolved from the time when a player could have days of honorable competition wiped out by some subtle violation he wasn't even aware he committed. I'm still disgusted over the silly ruling that knocked Dustin Johnson out of the PGA Championship in 2010.
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