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By DAN BERGER | December 29, 1993
Strobe Talbott did such a good job straightening out Russia, Bill is giving him the rest of the world.Let's hope Bill didn't use a baited duck blind as most of those Washington big shots do when they get to the Shore.New Yorkers are trading in their Uzis for Barbis, one fantasy for another.France closed its beaches for pollution, which is a shame, because the North Atlantic is so swimmable in January.
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NEWS
Lionel Foster | March 28, 2013
Five years ago, I thought I might have to leave Baltimore. Not because I wanted to but because I thought I needed to. It was 2008. Like many employers, Urbanite magazine, where I worked, was feeling the effects of the Great Recession, so I would soon have only half a job. The cut gave me a chance to rethink a few things. Just a few years earlier, I was at the London School of Economics sharing hallways with one of then-Libyan leader Muammar Gadhafi's sons and the crown prince of Norway.
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NEWS
By Timothy J. McNulty and Timothy J. McNulty,Chicago Tribune | February 28, 1993
AT THE HIGHEST LEVELS. Michael R. Beschloss and Strobe Talbott. Little, Brown. 512 pages. $24.95. The world changed at a gallop during the first three years of George Bush's presidency. Only a few months into 1989 and VTC Communist regimes were starting to unravel, first in Poland, later Hungary and Czechoslovakia and throughout Eastern Europe. By autumn, the Berlin Wall was breached, and instead of waiting for protracted negotiations, the reunification of Germany began immediately.By the end of that momentous year, Mr. Bush and Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev met at the "seasick summit" off Malta and began a truly extraordinary series of negotiations over the reduction of nuclear and conventional arms.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 10, 1999
WASHINGTON -- For Strobe Talbott, who has spent the past six weeks shuttling from Washington to Moscow and European capitals trying to end the Kosovo war, more is at stake in his mission than peace in the Balkans.Since his old friend Bill Clinton tapped him as an adviser on the former Soviet Union in 1993, Talbott has been a consistent -- and at times lonely -- proponent of the idea that Russia can be a responsible U.S. partner in world affairs.Now, with Serbian troops poised to pull out of Kosovo after 11 weeks of NATO airstrikes, Talbott's idea is gaining renewed respect.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | December 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Strobe Talbott, a longtime friend of President Clinton's and a journalist-turned-diplomat for eight months, will be promoted today to the State Department's No. 2 post, officials said yesterday.The appointment as deputy secretary marks a stunning rise by Mr. Talbott, who has been the administration's top policy-maker on the former Soviet Union and one of the president's key advisers.The appointment, which will be subject to Senate confirmation, will be announced at a 2 p.m. EST press conference in Los Angeles by Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher, who is vacationing in California.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | November 17, 1994
Paris.--With Republicans in control of the U.S. Congress, the Western alliance's drift into disunion is speeded up. At best we are on our way toward weaker and more selective forms of cooperation between Washington and its old partners.American foreign policy has already changed with respect to Bosnia, and other changes will follow. The country's fundamental interests have not changed, but the new American congressional majority sees the world in its own way, which is not that of the Clinton administration, nor that of America's allies.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | March 28, 2013
Five years ago, I thought I might have to leave Baltimore. Not because I wanted to but because I thought I needed to. It was 2008. Like many employers, Urbanite magazine, where I worked, was feeling the effects of the Great Recession, so I would soon have only half a job. The cut gave me a chance to rethink a few things. Just a few years earlier, I was at the London School of Economics sharing hallways with one of then-Libyan leader Muammar Gadhafi's sons and the crown prince of Norway.
NEWS
By STEVE H. HANKE | March 4, 1994
President Leonid Kravchuk of Ukraine arrives in Washington today to meet President Clinton and members of Congress. There are two general perspectives on the importance of this meeting.Zbigniew Brzezinski argues in the current issue of Foreign Affairs that the West must create conditions such that Russia can't follow a neo-imperialist course, and that the Russian-Ukrainian border is the best place to draw a line in the sand.Irving Kristol, on the other hand, concludes that Ukraine's fate is to become ''a client state, or semi-protectorate of Russia.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 10, 1999
WASHINGTON -- For Strobe Talbott, who has spent the past six weeks shuttling from Washington to Moscow and European capitals trying to end the Kosovo war, more is at stake in his mission than peace in the Balkans.Since his old friend Bill Clinton tapped him as an adviser on the former Soviet Union in 1993, Talbott has been a consistent -- and at times lonely -- proponent of the idea that Russia can be a responsible U.S. partner in world affairs.Now, with Serbian troops poised to pull out of Kosovo after 11 weeks of NATO airstrikes, Talbott's idea is gaining renewed respect.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 5, 1994
WASHINGTON -- South Asia's potential for explosiveness -- both good and bad -- is finally getting the Clinton administration's attention.Newly eager for world trade, with a population soon to reach 1 billion, India is high on the Commerce Department's list of "big emerging markets" ripe for U.S. exports and investment.And nowhere in the world, U.S. officials believe, is there a greater likelihood of nuclear war -- between India and its neighbor and enemy of four decades, Pakistan.One consequence is a trip to the region this week by Strobe Talbott -- his first as deputy secretary of state -- in part to present an arms-control proposal to cap both sides' nuclear and missile development.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | November 17, 1994
Paris.--With Republicans in control of the U.S. Congress, the Western alliance's drift into disunion is speeded up. At best we are on our way toward weaker and more selective forms of cooperation between Washington and its old partners.American foreign policy has already changed with respect to Bosnia, and other changes will follow. The country's fundamental interests have not changed, but the new American congressional majority sees the world in its own way, which is not that of the Clinton administration, nor that of America's allies.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 5, 1994
WASHINGTON -- South Asia's potential for explosiveness -- both good and bad -- is finally getting the Clinton administration's attention.Newly eager for world trade, with a population soon to reach 1 billion, India is high on the Commerce Department's list of "big emerging markets" ripe for U.S. exports and investment.And nowhere in the world, U.S. officials believe, is there a greater likelihood of nuclear war -- between India and its neighbor and enemy of four decades, Pakistan.One consequence is a trip to the region this week by Strobe Talbott -- his first as deputy secretary of state -- in part to present an arms-control proposal to cap both sides' nuclear and missile development.
NEWS
By STEVE H. HANKE | March 4, 1994
President Leonid Kravchuk of Ukraine arrives in Washington today to meet President Clinton and members of Congress. There are two general perspectives on the importance of this meeting.Zbigniew Brzezinski argues in the current issue of Foreign Affairs that the West must create conditions such that Russia can't follow a neo-imperialist course, and that the Russian-Ukrainian border is the best place to draw a line in the sand.Irving Kristol, on the other hand, concludes that Ukraine's fate is to become ''a client state, or semi-protectorate of Russia.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 29, 1993
Strobe Talbott did such a good job straightening out Russia, Bill is giving him the rest of the world.Let's hope Bill didn't use a baited duck blind as most of those Washington big shots do when they get to the Shore.New Yorkers are trading in their Uzis for Barbis, one fantasy for another.France closed its beaches for pollution, which is a shame, because the North Atlantic is so swimmable in January.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | December 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Strobe Talbott, a longtime friend of President Clinton's and a journalist-turned-diplomat for eight months, will be promoted today to the State Department's No. 2 post, officials said yesterday.The appointment as deputy secretary marks a stunning rise by Mr. Talbott, who has been the administration's top policy-maker on the former Soviet Union and one of the president's key advisers.The appointment, which will be subject to Senate confirmation, will be announced at a 2 p.m. EST press conference in Los Angeles by Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher, who is vacationing in California.
NEWS
By Timothy J. McNulty and Timothy J. McNulty,Chicago Tribune | February 28, 1993
AT THE HIGHEST LEVELS. Michael R. Beschloss and Strobe Talbott. Little, Brown. 512 pages. $24.95. The world changed at a gallop during the first three years of George Bush's presidency. Only a few months into 1989 and VTC Communist regimes were starting to unravel, first in Poland, later Hungary and Czechoslovakia and throughout Eastern Europe. By autumn, the Berlin Wall was breached, and instead of waiting for protracted negotiations, the reunification of Germany began immediately.By the end of that momentous year, Mr. Bush and Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev met at the "seasick summit" off Malta and began a truly extraordinary series of negotiations over the reduction of nuclear and conventional arms.
NEWS
February 4, 1999
THE PURPOSE of economic sanctions on India and Pakistan is not to punish them for detonating nuclear explosions last May but to persuade them to sign the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, renouncing further nuclear explosions.There were good reasons to impose sanctions, after both countries detonated underground nuclear explosions to test weapons they are capable of inflicting on each other. Since their joint independence in 1947, the two countries have fought three wars.There are equally good reasons to want sanctions lifted.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 27, 1999
MOSCOW -- U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright and top Russian officials papered over their differences on missile defenses and other issues yesterday, clearing the way for renewed pledges of international cooperation."
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