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Strobe Lights

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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | January 21, 2007
If you've driven by Oakland Mills High School in the early morning or evening, you might have noticed strobe lights flashing from the roof. The lights are a way to repel about 100 turkey vultures that roost on the roof and rip away patches of material in the process. The vultures started showing up in November, and school officials are illuminating the strobe lights every day from 5 a.m. to 7:30 a.m. and from 5 p.m. until 9 p.m. Maintenance workers are exploring the use of reflectors to repel the birds.
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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | January 21, 2007
If you've driven by Oakland Mills High School in the early morning or evening, you might have noticed strobe lights flashing from the roof. The lights are a way to repel about 100 turkey vultures that roost on the roof and rip away patches of material in the process. The vultures started showing up in November, and school officials are illuminating the strobe lights every day from 5 a.m. to 7:30 a.m. and from 5 p.m. until 9 p.m. Maintenance workers are exploring the use of reflectors to repel the birds.
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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | March 31, 1991
A group of residents say they hope the county's new Board of Commissioners will take a fresh look at their 6-year-old complaint over blinking lights on the WGRX-FM radio tower."
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 27, 2002
There's a long history of Western photographers in the Third World, and most of it falls into two categories: photojournalistic coverage of wars, natural disasters and political upheaval, and National Geographic-type pictures of "primitive" peoples, which tend mainly to reinforce European notions of superiority under cover of sly, voyeuristic images of scantily clad non-white women. Phil Borges' photographs at Gomez Gallery don't quite qualify as journalism, but neither are they just another excuse for imperialist cheesecake.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | December 18, 1991
A communications company reluctantly has complied with a county commissioner order to replace strobe lights on its WGRX-FM radio tower here, pleasing a small group of nearby residents who battled for the change for six years.Shamrock Communications, based in Scranton, Pa., took almost the entire 180-day grace period granted by the commissioners before replacing the white strobes with a constant red light at night. Hampstead resident Sean Gibbons, who led the citizens group,said he noticed the change on Dec. 9."
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 27, 2002
There's a long history of Western photographers in the Third World, and most of it falls into two categories: photojournalistic coverage of wars, natural disasters and political upheaval, and National Geographic-type pictures of "primitive" peoples, which tend mainly to reinforce European notions of superiority under cover of sly, voyeuristic images of scantily clad non-white women. Phil Borges' photographs at Gomez Gallery don't quite qualify as journalism, but neither are they just another excuse for imperialist cheesecake.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | June 9, 1991
Tenacity and an election have paid dividends for residents annoyed by the strobe lights of the WGRX tower.The station now has six months either to switch to a continuous red light after dark or to appeal Thursday's order by the County Commissioners.The board announced Thursday its 2-1 vote to order the change after a group of residents petitioned the county last April for a hearing. In 1987, the same request was turned down by a different Board of Commissioners.Carroll's delegation, led by Richard N. Dixon, D-Carroll, led the General Assembly to pass a law in 1985 that gave the county the authority to make the order.
NEWS
April 21, 1991
Editor's note: Rising costs, fewer state and federal dollars, and falling county revenues have pushed Carroll's deficit over $5 million, spurring immediate cutbacks, reduced work forces and, for the first time, talk of possible layoffs. The Budget Office has directed all county agencies to cut their budgets by 1 percent for fiscal 1991, whichends June 30, and by 2 percent for fiscal 1992. For the first time in more than a decade, Carroll will experience actual cuts in programs. We have been asking readers where cuts should be made, whether taxes should be increased, and related questions.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1999
A county fire inspector cited Crofton Middle School Tuesday for violating the state fire code because strobe lights attached to fire alarms to warn deaf students of danger were not working.Firefighters called to the school because of a natural gas leak issued the citation and a repair order on the spot, Battalion Chief Martin P. Pardoe said yesterday. School officials said they did not know whether the lights had been repaired yesterday.Fire inspectors opened an investigation into the school's evacuation procedures Tuesday after students took longer than six minutes to get out of the building.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | September 12, 1999
The dream was always the same. She was trapped below the surface of a vast, watery darkness, drowning. She could hear a steady pounding, like a drum or heartbeat, growing louder and nearer. She couldn't breathe, couldn't cry out, couldn't do anything except feel. And what she felt was fear.Eventually, the dream of drowning stopped. Little Connie Imboden grew up in Ruxton, went to art school and studied photography. Twenty years later, her work is admired and exhibited all over the world. Her first book of photographs, "Out of Darkness," was published in 1992.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | September 12, 1999
The dream was always the same. She was trapped below the surface of a vast, watery darkness, drowning. She could hear a steady pounding, like a drum or heartbeat, growing louder and nearer. She couldn't breathe, couldn't cry out, couldn't do anything except feel. And what she felt was fear.Eventually, the dream of drowning stopped. Little Connie Imboden grew up in Ruxton, went to art school and studied photography. Twenty years later, her work is admired and exhibited all over the world. Her first book of photographs, "Out of Darkness," was published in 1992.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1999
A county fire inspector cited Crofton Middle School Tuesday for violating the state fire code because strobe lights attached to fire alarms to warn deaf students of danger were not working.Firefighters called to the school because of a natural gas leak issued the citation and a repair order on the spot, Battalion Chief Martin P. Pardoe said yesterday. School officials said they did not know whether the lights had been repaired yesterday.Fire inspectors opened an investigation into the school's evacuation procedures Tuesday after students took longer than six minutes to get out of the building.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | December 18, 1991
A communications company reluctantly has complied with a county commissioner order to replace strobe lights on its WGRX-FM radio tower here, pleasing a small group of nearby residents who battled for the change for six years.Shamrock Communications, based in Scranton, Pa., took almost the entire 180-day grace period granted by the commissioners before replacing the white strobes with a constant red light at night. Hampstead resident Sean Gibbons, who led the citizens group,said he noticed the change on Dec. 9."
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | June 9, 1991
Tenacity and an election have paid dividends for residents annoyed by the strobe lights of the WGRX tower.The station now has six months either to switch to a continuous red light after dark or to appeal Thursday's order by the County Commissioners.The board announced Thursday its 2-1 vote to order the change after a group of residents petitioned the county last April for a hearing. In 1987, the same request was turned down by a different Board of Commissioners.Carroll's delegation, led by Richard N. Dixon, D-Carroll, led the General Assembly to pass a law in 1985 that gave the county the authority to make the order.
NEWS
April 21, 1991
Editor's note: Rising costs, fewer state and federal dollars, and falling county revenues have pushed Carroll's deficit over $5 million, spurring immediate cutbacks, reduced work forces and, for the first time, talk of possible layoffs. The Budget Office has directed all county agencies to cut their budgets by 1 percent for fiscal 1991, whichends June 30, and by 2 percent for fiscal 1992. For the first time in more than a decade, Carroll will experience actual cuts in programs. We have been asking readers where cuts should be made, whether taxes should be increased, and related questions.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | March 31, 1991
A group of residents say they hope the county's new Board of Commissioners will take a fresh look at their 6-year-old complaint over blinking lights on the WGRX-FM radio tower."
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1996
Before gangsta raps there were raps about libraries and teen-age pregnancy; before Dannemora State Prison and the killing bullets, there were pillow fights and the exuberance of youth.Tupac Amaru Shakur did not grow up in Baltimore. He was not a finished product when he left. But his years here encompassed that crucial time when childhood ends and self-discovery begins.He was 14 when he and his mother moved here from the Bronx in 1985. He called himself MC New York and won a rap contest sponsored by the Enoch Pratt Free Library.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2001
Two men accused of impersonating FBI agents were arrested in southern Baltimore yesterday morning by city police, who recovered several fake identification cards as well as a handgun and two blue strobe lights, authorities said. Charged with impersonating federal agents and handgun violations were Frank S. Jules, 34, of the 5900 block of Stevens Forest Road in Columbia and Samuel St. Fleur, 20, of the 1400 block of Anglesea St. in Baltimore, police said. The arrests occurred after officers saw a Ford Expedition parked at Wenburn Street and Sidney Avenue about 12:30 a.m., and found that its New York tags were expired.
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