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By PETER BAKER | October 24, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- Monday night in a conference room at the Department of Natural Resources, the Striped Bass Advisory Board convened another in a series of work sessions intended to formulate recommendations for the 1991 striped-bass season or seasons in Maryland waters.3 1/2 hours of discussions and deliberations, the eight board members who were present decided one point and seemed to backtrack on several others.a meeting on Oct. 1, the advisory board announced that it had reached a consensus on several tentative recommendations dealing with a late-spring fishery for striped bass, including separate charter and recreational seasons and a May trophy season.
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From Sun staff reports | September 14, 2014
Rick Snider of Biglerville, Pa., was the top winner in the grand-prize drawing at the Maryland Fishing Challenge Finale last Sunday, walking away with a boat, motor and trailer from Bass Pro Shops and Tracker Boats. "Aside from my kids, grandkids and wife, this is the most awesome thing to ever happen," said Snider, who qualified for the drawing by catching an Angler Award-qualifying 40.5-inch striped bass off Breezy Point in Calvert County from his sailboat. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources presented more than $70,000 in cash, prizes and merchandise at the celebration of fishing attended by more than 2,000 people, including sponsors, contestants and their guests, at Sandy Point State Park in Annapolis.
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SPORTS
By Lonny Weaver and Lonny Weaver,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 1998
You may have to do a little traveling or put some innovation into your techniques, but the striped-bass fishing continues to be good and promises to border on the terrific later in the month and into June.Last Monday morning, I fished the Chesapeake a bit south of Bloody Point with Capt. Gordon Haegerich (410-255-5792) and his brother, Bruce. I always enjoy fishing with Gordon, because he is a professional who truly loves to fish. In fact, this was his day off, so naturally he went fishing.
NEWS
By Catherine Rentz, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
Lawrence "Daniel" Murphy, 37, of St. Michaels pleaded guilty Friday to illegally harvesting striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay. He served periodically as a helper on the Kristin Marie between 2007 and 2012 with Tilghman Island watermen Michael D. Hayden, Jr. and William J. Lednum. In early 2011, he, Hayden and Lednum attempted to harvest more than 20,000 pounds of striped bass using illegal, unattended and unmarked weighted gill nets fish around "Bloody Point" on the bay before the season was opened.
NEWS
By Tim Wheeler and Tim Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | June 12, 2009
A St. Mary's County fish wholesaler who authorities say is at the heart of the largest striped-bass poaching case in Chesapeake Bay history pleaded guilty Thursday in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt to falsifying Maryland catch reports and interstate trafficking in illegal fish. Robert Lumpkins, owner of Golden Eye Seafood in Piney Point, admitted that from 2003 to 2007, while acting as a commercial check station for the state Department of Natural Resources, he and his employees falsely recorded the amount of striped bass, or rockfish, that fishermen caught.
NEWS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 6, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland's first striped-bass season in five years opened a couple of hours before dawn yesterday with some anglers expecting a bonanza and others wondering whether the season would be shut down before it had run its five-week course.Based on reports from charter-boat captains and recreational fishermen, Day 1 of the sportfishing season was neither boom nor bust.Prime spots on the bay and its tributaries were, however, crowded."I have been fishing the bay for a long time, and I never have seen anything like it," said Capt.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | September 26, 1990
The Department of Natural Resources has submitted its plan for seasons and bag limits during Maryland's 1990-91 waterfowl hunting season to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which is expected to approve the plan as submitted.Under the DNR plan, the Canada goose season will be 51 days with a bag limit of one goose per day in the first 16 days of the season and two per day for the last 35 days.The first session of Canada goose season will open Nov. 14 and run through Nov. 23. The second session will run from Dec. 3 through Jan. 12, with no hunting on Sunday, Dec. 9. The two-goose limit will take effect on Dec. 10.The initial proposal made by the DNR's Forest, Park and Wildlife Service called for a 47-day split season.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | April 17, 1994
Maryland's spring trophy striped-bass (rockfish) season has passed through the approval process, and now all that remains is for area anglers to get out on the Bay, beginning May 1, and have a ball.During the monthlong season each fisherman is allowed up to three rockfish, each measuring no less than 34 inches.To participate in the trophy season, anglers will need a current Chesapeake Bay sport-fishing license, plus a $2 striped-bass permit stamp.Stamps are available from these Carroll County locations: ACE Hardware or True Value in Hampstead; Fish Maryland, Eldersburg; Fritz's Radio-TV, Taneytown; and K mart in Westminster and Sykesville.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 17, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- The charter-boat season for striped bass will close Saturday at 8 p.m., William P. Jensen, director of fisheries for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Tidewater Administration, said yesterday."
SPORTS
July 9, 2011
Let's say you have a product that people automatically associate with you. Except for one hiccup in the timeline, it's been on the market since before Capt. John Smith rowed a boat around the Chesapeake. And it's so popular that people will do crazy things to get it, like sneak around at night and break the law. There's even a black market supplied by crooks willing to risk going to jail to feed the beast. But instead of treating this treasure like, well, a treasure, you keep it in a filthy hovel.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Worried by recent declines in the numbers of Maryland's state fish, Atlantic states fisheries regulators are weighing slashing the annual striped bass catch by up to one-third next year all along the East Coast and in the Chesapeake Bay. The proposal, to be aired Tuesday before the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, comes six months after a study found the striped bass population verging on being overfished and the number of spawning female...
SPORTS
April 19, 2014
Fish and the thermocline Monday, April 21: Capt. Brian Mayer of Marauder Charters will speak at a seminar hosted by the Broadneck/Magothy River chapter of the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association. He'll discuss how fish use the thermocline and salinity break as structure. Doors at the American Legion Post 175 at 832 Manhattan Beach Road in Severna Park open at 7 p.m.; the meeting starts at 7:30. For information, call Skip Zinck at 410 913-9043. Spring Sailboat Show April 25-27: The in-water Annapolis Spring Sailboat Show will feature new and previously owned sailboats, plus equipment, electronics, clothing and accessories at more than 100 on-land nautical exhibits and pro surf shops.
NEWS
Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Two Middle River men were charged Monday with overfishing striped bass from the Patapsco River, according to Maryland Natural Resources Police. Terry Alan Myrick, 53, and John James Messinger, 37, were caught near the Key Bridge on New Year's Day with 532 pounds of the fish, also known as rockfish, more than their daily harvest allotment, police said. They could each face fines of at least $400,000 and could have their fishing licenses revoked. Having checked Myrick and Messinger's nets and determined they were nearing their daily limit, officers set up surveillance and waited for the watermen to return, according to police.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | December 10, 2013
A recreational fishing group is taking issue with Maryland's plan to increase the allowable catch of striped bass in the Chesapeake Bay next year, calling it "imprudent" in light of troubling trends in the coastwide population of the highly prized migratory fish. Coastal Conservation Association Maryland has written Natural Resources Secretary Joseph P. Gill urging him to rescind his agency's decision to raise the annual harvest quota for striped bass, or rockfish, by 14 percent in 2014.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 22, 2013
Striped bass reproduction in Maryland waters improved this year, but remained well below average, state officials announced. The Department of Natural Resources said that its 2013 striped-bass juvenile index, a measure of spawning success in the Chesapeake Bay, is 5.8. That's much better than last year's tally of 0.9, but only about half the 60-year average of 11.7. “Several years of average reproduction mixed with large and small year-classes are typical for Striped Bass,” DNR Fisheries Director Tom O'Connell said in the press release announcing the results.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 18, 2013
A Tilghman Island commercial fisherman has been charged with witness tampering and intimidation in a federal investigation into alleged poaching of striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay, prosecutors announced Wednesday. Michael D. Hayden, Jr., 41,was arrested Tuesday, according to a news release issued by U.S. attorney Rod J. Rosenstein. Prosecutors say agents of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Maryland Natural Resources Police learned while investigating alleged striped bass poaching that Hayden had allegedly tried to manipulate some witnesses' testimony to a grand jury while trying to prevent others from testifying at all.  The criminal complaint against Hayden also alleges he threatened to retaliate against a potential witness he believed to be cooperating with investigators.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 6, 2010
Shawn Kimbro catches Chesapeake Bay striped bass Tennessee style. That is to say this son of the Volunteer State thinks of stripers as oversized largemouth bass with black racing stripes. There's a lot of running and gunning. And a lot of twitching and jigging. See the birds. Make a beeline for the birds. Fine-tune location with an eye on the fish finder. Drop lines. Crack the whip. Repeat as needed. It's not for the laid back. Or the introspective. But it is too much fun. And, most importantly, it works.
FEATURES
By Catherine Rentz, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A fish poaching case that began in February 2011 with a discovery of mysterious, illegally set nets full of tens of thousands of pounds of striped bass off Kent Island is finally coming to a close. Two Tilghman Island watermen pleaded guilty Friday in U.S. District Court to illegally taking 185,925 pounds of striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay. Michael D. Hayden, 41, and William J. Lednum, 42, admitted to selling the striped bass for $498,293 through a ring they operated between 2007 and 2011, according to court documents.
NEWS
June 17, 2013
You would probably have to over the age of 50 to remember when late May and early June meant shad in Maryland. In those days, the spawning season for American shad and river herring brought young and old to the banks of Maryland tributaries to catch their share of fish once so bountiful that they were shipped by the rail car load from Crisfield to Baltimore. Shad filet and shad roe were as big a part of the Chesapeake Bay's seafood bounty as anything on the plate today. They fed the American colonists all along the East Coast.
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