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NEWS
By Vicki Wellford and Vicki Wellford,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 1997
EPIPHANY EPISCOPAL Church regrets that it must postpone the English Country Tea scheduled for Saturday. The Odenton Heritage Society Bank Building Open House, planned in conjunction with the tea, also has been postponed. A new date will be posted in this column when it is scheduled.Ready for kindergarten?Odenton Elementary School is sponsoring a family activity hour for children ages 4 and 5 who will enter kindergarten next year and their parents, from 6: 30 p.m. to 7: 30 p.m. April 30 at the school.
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NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | October 7, 2009
For my Top 10 Affordable Steak Dinners list on my blog at baltimoresun.com/diningatlarge, I tried to keep prices around $25 or under. When you consider that upscale steakhouses charge $30 and $40 just for the beef and then you pay extra for starches and vegetables, that's something to take into account. Here's my list in alphabetical order: 1 Claddagh Pub in Canton. Surf and turf for $14.95: a 3-ounce filet and a 6-ounce crab cake. 2 Corks in Federal Hill. On Tuesdays, any of the selections on the steak menu are half-price.
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun restaurant critic | September 23, 2007
It's hard to believe that South Baltimore's SoBo Cafe has been open for 10 years now, and I had never eaten there until this month. South Baltimore has changed tremendously in the last decade. The SoBo Cafe, not so much. Looking back at our LIVE review at the time, I see that when this funky favorite first opened, the walls were a sunny yellow and nothing on the chalkboard menu cost more than $10. The walls are now the color of tomato bisque, with one dark blue one, but they are still hung with bright artwork.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun restaurant critic | September 23, 2007
It's hard to believe that South Baltimore's SoBo Cafe has been open for 10 years now, and I had never eaten there until this month. South Baltimore has changed tremendously in the last decade. The SoBo Cafe, not so much. Looking back at our LIVE review at the time, I see that when this funky favorite first opened, the walls were a sunny yellow and nothing on the chalkboard menu cost more than $10. The walls are now the color of tomato bisque, with one dark blue one, but they are still hung with bright artwork.
FEATURES
By MARY MAUSHARD and MARY MAUSHARD,The Evening Sun Eichenkranz The Sun Duda's The Sunday Sun | November 9, 1991
The BowmanThe Bowman, 9306 Harford Road, (410) 665-8600. The Bowman, just outside the Beltway in Parkville, seems to enjoy a good reputation and a loyal clientele. It's an inviting, attractive restaurant with a warm dining room and a comfortable atmosphere. We found the service and the food a little less accomplished than on earlier visits, but still enjoyed our meal, especially the French onion soup ($3.25), with its rich, buttery edge, and a nicely done strip steak ($16.95). $$moderate.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN and SLOANE BROWN,SUN REPORTER | November 2, 2005
If you thought the tapas craze was dying down, you're not thinking Baltimore. Or, in this case, Ellicott City where G.L. Shacks has morphed into Leelynn's Dining Room & Lounge. And one of its specialties is small plates - fried calamari with two Asian sauces, crab bruschetta, crispy eggplant, petite crab cakes, even mini-enchiladas - all costing in the $4 to $10 range. But small plates are only one section of the Leelynn's menu. There are entrees like roast pork loin stuffed with Asiago cheese, roasted red peppers and spinach ($18)
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 19, 2000
Hard to imagine. Puffins, the natural foods restaurant that once seemed so chic and off-the-wall, has become mainstream simply by being around for 20 years. When it first opened, another reviewer commented with surprise and dismay that it was a nonsmoking restaurant. No meat was served, just seafood and vegetarian dishes. Ethnic influences abounded. It doesn't sound so unusual anymore, does it? Over the years Puffins has reinvented itself to stay in tune with the times. At one point the owners opened a Tex-Mex dining room next door, Sin Carne, which in turn became Minato -- the Sushi Bar at Puffins.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 25, 2004
A small, constantly changing menu at a restaurant is almost always a good sign. Throw in a charming Federal Hill location, a careful list of inexpensive wines and rock-bottom prices, and it's hard to go wrong. That formula has been earning SoBo Cafe an affectionate following since it opened about six years ago. At 6 p.m. on the nose - when dinner service begins - customers start filing in, sitting at tables spaced a pleasant distance apart. The walls are painted bright tangerine and a bold blue.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | October 7, 2009
For my Top 10 Affordable Steak Dinners list on my blog at baltimoresun.com/diningatlarge, I tried to keep prices around $25 or under. When you consider that upscale steakhouses charge $30 and $40 just for the beef and then you pay extra for starches and vegetables, that's something to take into account. Here's my list in alphabetical order: 1 Claddagh Pub in Canton. Surf and turf for $14.95: a 3-ounce filet and a 6-ounce crab cake. 2 Corks in Federal Hill. On Tuesdays, any of the selections on the steak menu are half-price.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 15, 1998
There are people who would never consider going to the Trolley Stop, a rustic eatery on the edge of historic Ellicott City. Some might get as far as the cigarette haze at the bar, take a look at the year-round Christmas decorations and the rough wooden floors, and decide the Trolley Stop is not for them.They wouldn't even have to know this place was once a biker's bar with a bad reputation, a place so notorious for violent brawls that it was nicknamed the Bloody Bucket.That was before Joe Morea bought the 19th-century tavern in 1981 and started focusing more on food than drink.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | August 2, 2006
It seems new eateries are popping up every week in Locust Point. Case in point: Rail 17, which opened a couple of weeks ago near the Silo Point project. Dennis Porter says he and partner Linda Shanahan thought there was a shortage of good restaurants in the area and decided to spiff up the place from its old incarnation as the Irish pub Shanahan's, which was owned by Shanahan's late husband. Porter says he got rid of the old vinyl flooring and installed hardwood. The tables now have burnt-orange and white tablecloths.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN and SLOANE BROWN,SUN REPORTER | November 2, 2005
If you thought the tapas craze was dying down, you're not thinking Baltimore. Or, in this case, Ellicott City where G.L. Shacks has morphed into Leelynn's Dining Room & Lounge. And one of its specialties is small plates - fried calamari with two Asian sauces, crab bruschetta, crispy eggplant, petite crab cakes, even mini-enchiladas - all costing in the $4 to $10 range. But small plates are only one section of the Leelynn's menu. There are entrees like roast pork loin stuffed with Asiago cheese, roasted red peppers and spinach ($18)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 16, 2004
Haul out those shades. The starlight is blinding in B-more these days. First, Johnny Knoxville and Selma Blair were in town a couple of days ago for the premiere of John Waters' latest flick, A Dirty Shame. Now, invites are out for the Sept. 27 Charm City premiere of Ladder 49 with stars John Travolta, Joaquin Phoenix, Jacinda Barrett and director Jay Russell heading the lineup. The Senator Theatre screening will be a benefit for the Baltimore City Fire Foundation. Which seems only right.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 25, 2004
A small, constantly changing menu at a restaurant is almost always a good sign. Throw in a charming Federal Hill location, a careful list of inexpensive wines and rock-bottom prices, and it's hard to go wrong. That formula has been earning SoBo Cafe an affectionate following since it opened about six years ago. At 6 p.m. on the nose - when dinner service begins - customers start filing in, sitting at tables spaced a pleasant distance apart. The walls are painted bright tangerine and a bold blue.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2003
On a scorched afternoon a few days ago, two men sat in the deliciously cool black-lacquer- and-leopard-print dining room of the Prime Rib, Baltimore's high temple of carnivorous cuisine. The table between them was empty except for an open bottle of San Pellegrino water, an untouched ramekin of raw horseradish and dinner plates holding six New York strip steaks. One of the men, David Derewicz, the restaurant's affable and well-fed-looking general manager, sliced directly into the center of each perfectly cooked slab.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2002
Morse B. Solomon thinks he's found a great steak recipe: several pounds of tough, low-grade meat, several gallons of water, the equivalent of a quarter-stick of dynamite. Mix carefully and explode. "Not exactly something you'd try at home," said Solomon, a scientist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Beltsville Research facility who has spent the past decade working on his special dish. Solomon, a devoted carnivore, isn't trying to destroy the meat. Instead, he's tenderizing and sanitizing it. Early test results show that when the meat and charge are submerged, sound waves produced by the explosives rip through the meat, leaving it unchanged to the naked eye but making the cut more tender as well as killing much of its bacteria, such as E. coli.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2002
Morse B. Solomon thinks he's found a great steak recipe: several pounds of tough, low-grade meat, several gallons of water, the equivalent of a quarter-stick of dynamite. Mix carefully and explode. "Not exactly something you'd try at home," said Solomon, a scientist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Beltsville Research facility who has spent the past decade working on his special dish. Solomon, a devoted carnivore, isn't trying to destroy the meat. Instead, he's tenderizing and sanitizing it. Early test results show that when the meat and charge are submerged, sound waves produced by the explosives rip through the meat, leaving it unchanged to the naked eye but making the cut more tender as well as killing much of its bacteria, such as E. coli.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2003
On a scorched afternoon a few days ago, two men sat in the deliciously cool black-lacquer- and-leopard-print dining room of the Prime Rib, Baltimore's high temple of carnivorous cuisine. The table between them was empty except for an open bottle of San Pellegrino water, an untouched ramekin of raw horseradish and dinner plates holding six New York strip steaks. One of the men, David Derewicz, the restaurant's affable and well-fed-looking general manager, sliced directly into the center of each perfectly cooked slab.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 19, 2000
Hard to imagine. Puffins, the natural foods restaurant that once seemed so chic and off-the-wall, has become mainstream simply by being around for 20 years. When it first opened, another reviewer commented with surprise and dismay that it was a nonsmoking restaurant. No meat was served, just seafood and vegetarian dishes. Ethnic influences abounded. It doesn't sound so unusual anymore, does it? Over the years Puffins has reinvented itself to stay in tune with the times. At one point the owners opened a Tex-Mex dining room next door, Sin Carne, which in turn became Minato -- the Sushi Bar at Puffins.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 15, 1998
There are people who would never consider going to the Trolley Stop, a rustic eatery on the edge of historic Ellicott City. Some might get as far as the cigarette haze at the bar, take a look at the year-round Christmas decorations and the rough wooden floors, and decide the Trolley Stop is not for them.They wouldn't even have to know this place was once a biker's bar with a bad reputation, a place so notorious for violent brawls that it was nicknamed the Bloody Bucket.That was before Joe Morea bought the 19th-century tavern in 1981 and started focusing more on food than drink.
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