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By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
Many of us grew up thinking that green beans came from a can. Those soft and water-logged beans were all we knew until we had our eyes were opened up to the true flavor of string beans (the name covers haricot verts, wax beans and green beans) that were fresh and properly cooked. But the problem is how to cook them differently. While steaming in a pan or boiling in salted water work well, it can get a little monotonous. So this time, try grilling. The dry heat evaporates the water inside the beans and concentrates the flavor while also picking up char from the flame.
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
I plan to cover my string beans with floating row cover to keep off the Mexican bean beetles. Can I leave it on after the beans start flowering? What about using it on other vegetables? Row cover can remain on string beans through the growing season because string beans do not need insect cross-pollination in order to produce a crop. Row cover can also be left on the following crops from planting through harvest: tomato, pepper, pea, cabbage and the rest of the cabbage family including broccoli and radish, lettuce and other leafy greens, spinach, beet, Swiss chard, onion, garlic, potato and sweet potato, carrot, and Southern pea. I saw a snake with a triangular head in my yard.
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By ELLEN HAWKS and ELLEN HAWKS,SUN STAFF | October 11, 1995
Since when did a plain old string bean come alive in a delicious soup?Answer: When Jane Dannemann of Baltimore gave the thought a chance by requesting a string bean soup that had sour cream in it and when Jon DeHart and Esther P. Weiner, both of Baltimore, sent in choice responses.DeHart's string bean soupServes 4 to 61 package frozen string beans1 stalk celery, chopped1 carrot, finely diced1 chopped onion1/2 pint sour creamsalt and pepperCook beans according to package directions and save liquid.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
Many of us grew up thinking that green beans came from a can. Those soft and water-logged beans were all we knew until we had our eyes were opened up to the true flavor of string beans (the name covers haricot verts, wax beans and green beans) that were fresh and properly cooked. But the problem is how to cook them differently. While steaming in a pan or boiling in salted water work well, it can get a little monotonous. So this time, try grilling. The dry heat evaporates the water inside the beans and concentrates the flavor while also picking up char from the flame.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 14, 2004
I'M A PRETTY GOOD housekeeper. Ask anybody. No, wait: Don't ask my wife. She and I disagree on certain housekeeping issues, such as whether it's OK for a house to contain dirt. Also smells. If NASA scientists really want to know about life on Mars, instead of sending up robots that keep finding rocks, they need to send my wife, and have her take a whiff of the Martian atmosphere. If there's a single one-celled organism anywhere on the planet, she'll smell it. And if the other astronauts don't stop her, she'll kill it with Lysol.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
I plan to cover my string beans with floating row cover to keep off the Mexican bean beetles. Can I leave it on after the beans start flowering? What about using it on other vegetables? Row cover can remain on string beans through the growing season because string beans do not need insect cross-pollination in order to produce a crop. Row cover can also be left on the following crops from planting through harvest: tomato, pepper, pea, cabbage and the rest of the cabbage family including broccoli and radish, lettuce and other leafy greens, spinach, beet, Swiss chard, onion, garlic, potato and sweet potato, carrot, and Southern pea. I saw a snake with a triangular head in my yard.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 1995
Just in time for the holidays, here's a quick paella recipe that's perfect for the family or for entertaining friends. Read the recipe carefully first, so you understand the two processes: steaming and sauteing. One saute pan and one large Dutch oven -- both with lids -- are required here. The pan sizes are important for perfectly cooked ingredients.To accompany the paella, prepare a fresh green salad. Toss with a vinaigrette and some pitted black olives and toasted chopped almonds.For the sweet finish, try a purchased rich chocolate cake with chocolate frosting to which you've added a fruity garnish of overlapping half moon slices of oranges.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | October 25, 2006
Aquarelas Brazilian Restaurant 1622 Eastern Ave., Baltimore -- 410-276-6012 Hours --10 a.m.-9 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays; 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Sundays BEST BITE Our favorite dish was the feijoada, $8.40, a traditional meal of black beans, pork, white rice, dried meat and chopped green vegetables. The surprisingly soft chunks of pork came in a side container mixed with hearty black beans. For us, the only drawback was the occasional bone in the pork, which came as a surprise. It would have been nice if the menu or server had warned us in advance.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1997
Vera's Bakery & Cafe, in a small Severna Park shopping center, is an adorably decorated Brazilian-American eatery with a decidedly feminine feel and a staff so bent on accommodating its diners that the few minor problems can be overlooked.Vera's is a tiny place that opened on Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard two years ago as a bakery, then grew to a breakfast and lunch stop, and now serves high tea in the late afternoon and dinner as well.I stopped to check it out on a Monday -- the one day Vera's is closed.
NEWS
By Edward L. Heard Jr. and Edward L. Heard Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | July 1, 1991
Walter Bedford, 72, first became interested in farming more than 15 years ago when he planted flowers on a small patch of land in Randallstown.From the roots of that hobby a family business grew -- one that specializes in home-grown string beans, onions, sweet potatoes, peppers and other vegetables that Bedford grows on his 20-acre Baltimore County farm.Bedford was one of about 40 farmers gathered under the Jones Falls Expressway downtown yesterday morning at Baltimore's Farmers' Market.The market, a tradition for 13 years, will operate every Sunday this year through Dec. 22.Its official opening day was June 23, but heavy rain kept customers away.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
A $60,000 federal grant announced Thursday will allow the South Baltimore neighborhood of Cherry Hill to grow several new community gardens. Three-quarters of the U.S. Department of Agriculture money will be divided among community groups that will create and run the gardens, said grant administrator Nadine Braunstein, an assistant professor in Towson University's College of Health Professions. The remaining $15,000 will go to Towson to manage the program, she said. "Why were we inspired to do this in Cherry Hill?
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,SUN REPORTER | April 15, 2007
A West Baltimore community garden - suffering from years of neglect after contractors used it to dump building materials - turned into a political stump yesterday as some of the city's top officials vowed aggressive prosecution of illegal dumping and announced a renewed focus on preserving gardens to help quell crime and revitalize neighborhoods. Mayor Sheila Dixon, City Councilman and mayoral candidate Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. and City Council hopeful Adam S. Meister, who is campaigning to replace Mitchell in the 11th District, gathered in Upton to mark a rebirth of the decrepit garden near the 1200 block of Shields Place.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | October 25, 2006
Aquarelas Brazilian Restaurant 1622 Eastern Ave., Baltimore -- 410-276-6012 Hours --10 a.m.-9 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays; 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Sundays BEST BITE Our favorite dish was the feijoada, $8.40, a traditional meal of black beans, pork, white rice, dried meat and chopped green vegetables. The surprisingly soft chunks of pork came in a side container mixed with hearty black beans. For us, the only drawback was the occasional bone in the pork, which came as a surprise. It would have been nice if the menu or server had warned us in advance.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 14, 2004
I'M A PRETTY GOOD housekeeper. Ask anybody. No, wait: Don't ask my wife. She and I disagree on certain housekeeping issues, such as whether it's OK for a house to contain dirt. Also smells. If NASA scientists really want to know about life on Mars, instead of sending up robots that keep finding rocks, they need to send my wife, and have her take a whiff of the Martian atmosphere. If there's a single one-celled organism anywhere on the planet, she'll smell it. And if the other astronauts don't stop her, she'll kill it with Lysol.
NEWS
January 5, 2003
James Everett Sewell, 66, repaired heavy machinery James Everett Sewell, a 40-year mechanic for heavy equipment and avid crabber, died Friday at Easton Hospital of complications from a cerebral hemorrhage he had suffered 13 months earlier. He was 66. Mr. Sewell was born in the Eastern Shore in the small town of Wittman. His family moved to nearby St. Michaels, where he went to high school. After graduation in 1954, Mr. Sewell spent four years in the Air Force as a radar specialist, achieving the rank of airman first class.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 8, 2002
David Chu's China Bistro looks like a typical Chinese restaurant. The waiters are Asian. The menu lists all the usual suspects: egg foo young, a pu pu platter, kung pao chicken and Peking duck. Chopsticks and steaming pots of tea deck the tables. But look again. A bearded man in a yarmulke walks in and out of the kitchen. There's a small sink in the foyer between the restrooms. No shellfish or pork is on the menu. And on a recent night, all beef dishes had to be off the tables before sundown.
NEWS
January 5, 2003
James Everett Sewell, 66, repaired heavy machinery James Everett Sewell, a 40-year mechanic for heavy equipment and avid crabber, died Friday at Easton Hospital of complications from a cerebral hemorrhage he had suffered 13 months earlier. He was 66. Mr. Sewell was born in the Eastern Shore in the small town of Wittman. His family moved to nearby St. Michaels, where he went to high school. After graduation in 1954, Mr. Sewell spent four years in the Air Force as a radar specialist, achieving the rank of airman first class.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | January 26, 1994
From England to West Virginia, a Prince of Wales cake and pickled green beans span the full extent of taste differences. Try them.Mary Steingass of Baltimore asked for a pickled green bean recipe. "It is a favorite from West Virginia," she wrote.Rosalee Crouse of Bel Air responded with a recipe and some folklore. She writes that she is 70 and pickles string beans from her own garden each year using "a recipe that came from Virginia and North Carolina."To be good, the beans should be full beans with a bean inside.
NEWS
By Brian Sullam and Brian Sullam,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1998
Sandwiched between a weight-loss center and a travel agency in a nondescript strip center on Solomons Island Road just south of Annapolis, the Calvert House Restaurant doesn't present an exterior that draws customers.That's too bad, because if the motorists zipping past slowed down and turned in, they could dine on fresh, well-prepared and tasty food that is reasonably priced.Although the location could be a handicap for Farhad Salimi -- who has been operating the restaurant for 12 years -- the quality of his food and the friendly service have produced a loyal contingent of customers.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1997
Vera's Bakery & Cafe, in a small Severna Park shopping center, is an adorably decorated Brazilian-American eatery with a decidedly feminine feel and a staff so bent on accommodating its diners that the few minor problems can be overlooked.Vera's is a tiny place that opened on Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard two years ago as a bakery, then grew to a breakfast and lunch stop, and now serves high tea in the late afternoon and dinner as well.I stopped to check it out on a Monday -- the one day Vera's is closed.
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