Advertisement
HomeCollectionsStreetscape
IN THE NEWS

Streetscape

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | January 30, 1995
Although William Donald Schaefer opened or dedicated a flurry of state buildings before leaving office this month, he left some of the most unusual projects of his administration to be unveiled by his successor.They include miniature bronze replicas of a doghouse and a tepee. There also are an igloo, a mobile home and a lighthouse.All are part of a simulated streetscape -- a sculpture titled "Dwellings" -- that will be installed in the Maryland State Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped at a cost to Maryland taxpayers of $100,000.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
State and local officials in Baltimore County have announced that about $2.76 million is being allocated for traffic safety and community enhancement projects in the western part of the county. House of Delegates Speaker Pro Tem Delegate Adrienne Jones and State Transportation Secretary James T. Smith said Liberty Road in Randallstown will receive $762,000 for roadway and streetscape improvement; and Main Street in Reisterstown will receive $2 million for efforts aimed at improving motorist, bicyclist and pedestrian safety, and continuing revitalization in the area, according to a news release.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
State and local officials in Baltimore County have announced that about $2.76 million is being allocated for traffic safety and community enhancement projects in the western part of the county. House of Delegates Speaker Pro Tem Delegate Adrienne Jones and State Transportation Secretary James T. Smith said Liberty Road in Randallstown will receive $762,000 for roadway and streetscape improvement; and Main Street in Reisterstown will receive $2 million for efforts aimed at improving motorist, bicyclist and pedestrian safety, and continuing revitalization in the area, according to a news release.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2010
A nine-block stretch of Charles Street near the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus will undergo a $28 million makeover — including new sidewalks, curbs, streetlights and trees—under a deal approved by the city's spending board Wednesday. Plans for the renovation of the street, which have been in the works for at least seven years, are expected to be completed early next year, transportation department spokeswoman Adrienne Barnes said. Construction is expected to begin next summer.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1998
Plans to begin a $2.1 million streetscape project in Catonsville's business district along Frederick Road have been put off for at least two months because some shop owners are balking over proposed sidewalk renovations.Baltimore County's community conservation officials have been seeking approval from business owners along Frederick Road to begin relocating utility poles for the streetscape, but some owners say they oppose the overall project.The concerns -- and the task of identifying property ownership -- have forced engineers to wait at least until late May to begin the streetscape.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1995
Until April, Woodmoor Shopping Center was blighted with potholes, trash and cracked sidewalks. Its sign was more than 30 years old, the area was poorly lighted and the parking lot was a mess.Everett Kerr, who manages the North Star Book Store there, said he knew area residents who wouldn't shop at Woodmoor, and he summed the place up in a word: "Horrid."But after Baltimore County and the shopping center owner invested a combined $1 million, the property at Liberty and Essex roads has taken on a fresh look.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1996
Owners of property along Catonsville's main street will be mailed information today detailing a $1 million streetscape proposal to relocate utility poles behind Frederick Road businesses.The plan to move poles in the 600, 700 and 800 blocks of Frederick Road must be approved by all property owners before work can begin, said County Councilman Stephen G. Sam Moxley, a Catonsville Democrat."We will meet with each property owner individually to get their consent," Moxley said. "We hope to begin work in the fall."
NEWS
July 28, 1997
LOCATION AND ACCESSIBILITY once were enough to keep companies downtown and lure new ones. That changed years ago in America's cities as businesses gave up downtown's conveniences for the lack of congestion, clutter and crime they found at a suburban address.Making their downtowns safer has become a focus of cities trying to stanch the flow of businesses. But it is not enough. To compete with the Owings Mills, Columbias and Hunt Valleys that are attracting businesses, downtowns also must look as good as those suburban settings.
NEWS
By Ron Snyder and Ron Snyder,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 22, 1998
With Phase One of the $4.5 million Towson streetscape project nearly complete, building owners along York Road have begun working on improvements of their own.Faced with paying higher tax assessments or using that money to improve the fronts of their properties, most businesses chose the latter -- some spending thousands of dollars in the last several months, with the help of a county architect and low-interest loans through the county.The change is apparent at a Towson landmark, Angel's Grotto, where owner Joseph Varvaro, 67, put $4,000 in improvements into the 30-year-old restaurant, including new windows and doors.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2000
City officials and community activists gathered along a commercial strip in Roland Park yesterday to announce a construction project to spruce up the neighborhood center. Mayor Martin O'Malley joined more than 50 residents and business owners to mark the start of a $306,000 streetscape project - the result of a public-private partnership - in the 5100 block of Roland Ave. "This is a different way of looking at main streets," O'Malley said in announcing the improvements. "Main streets can set the tone and raise expectations."
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2009
A decade-old idea to turn a commercialized stretch of Harford Road in Baltimore County into a safer, more appealing and friendlier locale for pedestrians, shoppers and motorists has come to fruition with the $9 million Parkville streetscape. Now pocket parks with glistening black benches are tucked into several areas along the two miles of Harford Road from the city line to Joppa Road. Seasonal plants and landscaping, brick accents on sidewalks and retaining walls, and community signs are among the amenities that define the area.
NEWS
By Josh Dombroskie and Josh Dombroskie,Sun reporter | November 25, 2007
The steady beeping of machinery, the thunderous slam as jackhammer hits pavement and the constant crunch of gravel under the tires of a backhoe have overtaken the sounds of commerce on Main Street in downtown Bel Air. The $8.8 million Main Street Streetscape Project that is expanding a half-mile section and enlarging the sidewalks might eventually improve business in the county seat, but for now it is taking a bite out of sales. At least nine empty storefronts with "For Lease" signs in the windows line Main Street.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,SUN REPORTER | September 22, 2007
For nearly two decades, the antique cabooses have sat near the train tracks on Hammonds Ferry Road. Children have swung up the metal steps to play conductor and all sorts of folks have sat on the cabooses to watch the passenger trains speed by or count the cars on rumbling freight trains. Although their paint is chipped and fading, the cabooses are a landmark, Lansdowne residents say, and a reminder of the important role that trains have played in this southwestern Baltimore County community, once home to many employees of the B&O Railroad.
NEWS
By LAURA BARNHARDT and LAURA BARNHARDT,SUN REPORTER | February 7, 2006
Renovations are to begin this month on an aging apartment complex on Dundalk Avenue in an area where work has begun on a streetscape improvement project. Cummins Apartments, which will be renamed Portside Apartments, is to receive a new clubhouse-style community center, air conditioning and locked foyers, said an official with the development company that purchased the complex. "It's going to be a new place," said Jane Willeboordse, executive director of Dundalk Renaissance Corp., which is working with an Annapolis-based developer on the rehab project.
NEWS
By Winyan Soo Hoo and Winyan Soo Hoo,Special to baltimoresun.com | June 7, 2005
The Baltimore City Department of Transportation today announced evening lane closures along Fayette Street for intersection resurfacing this week. Shifting lane closures on Fayette Street at the intersection of President Street are scheduled to begin tonight and continue through Wednesday, officials said. Various lane closures will also be in effect at the intersection of Fayette and Gay streets on Wednesday and Thursday. All lane closures are in effect between 7 p.m. and 6 a.m. each night, weather permitting, and at least one lane of through traffic will remain open in each direction during construction, according to the department.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2004
Dundalk and Essex, two of Baltimore County's oldest communities, are receiving face lifts to "revive and thrive" their town centers. Millions of dollars have been earmarked or spent on streetscape projects along Dundalk Avenue, that community's main street, and on busy thoroughfares such as Eastern Boulevard, from Essex through Josenhans Corner to Middle River. "Obviously, private development has taken off aggressively along eastern Baltimore County's waterfront," said Mary Harvey, director of the county's Office of Community Conservation.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1996
A $2.5 million make-over of Towson's business district could be in trouble.With a key deadline just a week away, Baltimore County officials are scrambling to obtain the endorsement of property owners who would have to help finance the brick sidewalks, benches and greenery designed to give the district a new look.County officials remain optimistic that the project -- planned for when a traffic roundabout is to be built on the north end of town -- will not be delayed.But the officials will not disclose how many property owners support the project.
NEWS
By Winyan Soo Hoo and Winyan Soo Hoo,Special to baltimoresun.com | June 7, 2005
The Baltimore City Department of Transportation today announced evening lane closures along Fayette Street for intersection resurfacing this week. Shifting lane closures on Fayette Street at the intersection of President Street are scheduled to begin tonight and continue through Wednesday, officials said. Various lane closures will also be in effect at the intersection of Fayette and Gay streets on Wednesday and Thursday. All lane closures are in effect between 7 p.m. and 6 a.m. each night, weather permitting, and at least one lane of through traffic will remain open in each direction during construction, according to the department.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2003
U.S. 1 is eye- and ear-catching as it runs through Howard County - a view of warehouses, junkyards and gas stations, with the roar of tractor-trailers as background music. Care to sit alongside with a croissant and a cup of coffee? That local planners can suggest this pastime with straight faces drives home how much they are expecting Howard's industrial corridor will change. The county, poised to rezone hundreds of acres along the rundown corridor to encourage construction of midrise offices, apartments and quaint-looking shops, is planning to add a stretch of sidewalk, flowers and decorative-stone edging along medians on small sections of U.S. 1 this fall in a move officials hope will be repeated along a road that is uninviting for pedestrians.
NEWS
May 1, 2003
Pratt Street traffic slowed by 2 construction projects Eastbound traffic on Pratt Street leaving the Inner Harbor will be slower than usual through Tuesday, with lane closings necessitated by two continuing construction projects, and use of alternate routes is suggested by the city Department of Transportation. The Pratt Street lane closures are scheduled from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. through tomorrow between Gay Street and Market Place for work on the Market Place Streetscape project. Lane closures will take place during the same hours through Tuesday from President Street to Central Avenue for the Flaghouse Courts development project, the department said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.