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By Emeri B. O'Brien and Emeri B. O'Brien,Sun Staff | August 7, 2005
The heat is blazing. But Mark Whitten sits coolly in his red Cadillac parked in the Mondawmin shopping center in West Baltimore. Window down. Music playing. His mind is focused on making the sale. On a good day, he may sell up to 75 CDs. "These parking lots are like the ocean. We are like sharks trying to get a dollar and a buzz," says Whitten, a recent marketing graduate from Morgan State University. He leans out of the window, smoothly nods, calls out to a woman walking by and pulls out the product: local rapper Bossman's Law and Order CD. It's this kind of pop-the-trunk, on-the-street type hustling that helped Whitten's friend, Bossman, ink a deal in May with Virgin Records.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
A 780-pound steer headed for slaughter in West Baltimore seized a chance at freedom Friday, leaping a barbed-wire fence and taking a brisk two-mile walk along North Avenue that ended when the animal was gunned down by police in Mid-Town Belvedere. The steer was first spotted about 10:15 a.m. after escaping from the George G. Ruppersberger & Sons Inc. slaughterhouse in the 2600 block of Pennsylvania Ave., according to police. It was shot less than an hour later. Scores of people took pictures of the felled animal at North Charles and Preston Street, and the incident became fodder for social media, which lit up with pictures, Internet memes ("Cow Ripken")
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NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | December 22, 2008
Wendell Mundrow knew him as Anthony, a fellow middle-aged man living on the street. Mundrow, 50, remembers sharing space at a lot near a downtown federal building two years ago with Anthony, where the two swapped stories about life and the circumstances that left each without a place to stay. Last night, Mundrow attended a memorial service and candlelight vigil at the Inner Harbor Amphitheater for Anthony and dozens of others who died this year while living on the streets of Baltimore "He died because he was homeless.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
It was just after noon Saturday and a large blue-crab-mobile was drifting out into the harbor with four students from Arbutus Middle School aboard and unable to steer. The problem? A thrown sock puppet that had damaged their controls. The absurd moment captured the spirit of the annual Kinetic Sculpture Race, now in its 15th year, even down to the puppet as the source of mischief — carrying one is a requirement of the competition. School principal Michelle Feeney watched anxiously from a pier at Canton Waterfront Park as a pair of kayakers paddled out to tow the middle-schoolers back to shore, so they could continue on their way. "All they care about is who threw the sock puppet," Feeney said.
NEWS
By Joel Obermayer and Joel Obermayer,Sun Staff Writer | January 1, 1995
Drug money made Mumin Sahib Abdullah rich.The loft of his Owings Mills townhouse was filled with silk suits, fur coats and $600 shoes. He had four foreign cars, including a $50,000 Range Rover. His wife ran up monthly bills as high as $16,000 at Saks Fifth Avenue and spent thousands more at other chic stores. Abdullah threw champagne parties at a private club.The couple's high-flying lifestyle was financed on the streets of Baltimore. Abdullah's heroin operation, begun in 1990, was an entrepreneur's dream.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 28, 1992
How 'bout the U.N. brokering a cease-fire on the streets of Baltimore?Iraq resolved the crisis by permitting the United Nations to pretend it had won.The Dream Team is playing Olympic Basketball, except for Barkley who is into Olympic Judo.Talk about self-hatred. Baltimore City Community College is tearing itself down.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 1, 1994
If Major League baseball players strike for a living wage, can CEOs and heart surgeons be far behind?Pass the crime bill! (Never mind what's in it.)Anyone under 17 on the streets of Baltimore City after 11 p.m. on weeknights, or midnight on weekends, is henceforth a criminal. Yet another problem solved.Bawlmer has everything else. We don't need tornadoes.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | December 1, 2007
Melvin O. Miller, an artist whose oil paintings depicted Baltimore scenes of streetcars, harbor tugs and wooden market sheds, died of a heart attack Monday at St. Agnes Hospital. The Woodlawn resident was 70. Mr. Miller belonged to a group known as the Realists of Baltimore, artists who rejected abstract expressionism of the 1950s and employed luminous paints based upon ancient formulas. He stored 300 pigments in apothecary jars in his studio. "He had a way of capturing the activity on the streets of Baltimore," said fellow artist and friend Nancy Conrad, with whom he shared a Fleet Street studio.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer Staff writers Melody Simmons and William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | September 22, 1992
On the eve of burying one of their own, the city police officers union asked Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke yesterday to "instill fear in criminals" by putting more officers on the street and pushing for use of the death penalty."
FEATURES
By Gerald P. Merrell and Gerald P. Merrell,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2004
By 8 o'clock on a recent night, the streets of Baltimore were virtually deserted as wind gusts of 32 mph drove temperatures into the teens and people inside. Patrick Rhodes and Melissa Faith Coleman were two exceptions. They spent part of the night roaming the streets of Baltimore, seeking out homeless people who might be in need of a sleeping bag. They found one man just off of Fleet Street near Eaton Street. He was seeking sanctuary from the biting Arctic air behind two pea-green utility boxes.
NEWS
By Emaun Kashfipour and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 4, 2011
For many people, when they think of Baltimore, they might imagine the crime-ridden streets that were practically a character in the HBO series, "The Wire. " For others, the city can bring to mind more sanitized images of Ravens, Orioles or the Inner Harbor. But when Theodis Walkins thinks of his hometown, he sees people and uses pictures and videos to tell their story. Walkins, 31, has lived in Baltimore his whole life. Having been raised by a single parent, he is well aware of the struggles that inner city residents go through every day. A couple of years ago, he decided to pick up his cameras and document what he knew.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
Saturday is the day Fifi looks forward to every year. Fifi is the American Visionary Art Museum 's giant pink poodle-with-wheels, who once a year ventures outside to take part in what is clearly Baltimore's funkiest annual event, the Kinetic Sculpture Race . This year, some 36 land- and seaworthy vehicles, all strictly people-powered, will be taking part in the 15-mile race over land, sea, mud and sand. Like Fifi, some are designed to resemble animals; one of last year's crowd favorites was a hookah-smoking caterpillar.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2010
Venture out into East Baltimore's McElderry Park neighborhood after a shooting and you're likely to come across Gardnel Carter, a hulking, 48-year-old man who spent two decades in prison for murder. Along with a crew of men with similar backgrounds, dressed in matching orange and black jackets, he mingles with drug dealers and gang members, discussing what went down and going over their next moves. Police cruisers often pull up, with officers barking for them to scatter. But Carter isn't one of the usual suspects.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,anica.butler@baltsun.com | October 8, 2009
After months of grueling training, an estimated 20,000 people plan to wake up really early Saturday morning just to run the streets of Baltimore. If you are not one of them, you are so not alone. But even if you're not lacing up your sneakers for one of the several races of the Baltimore Running Festival, you can still participate in the festivities. Hordes of city residents are expected to line the streets of the marathon course to cheer on the runners. And those runners mark an event record this year, with more than 20,000 from 44 countries and every state plus D.C., organizers say. Also expected to run on Saturday are five Olympians: two in the marathon, two in the half and skater Kimmie Meissner in the sold-out 5k. "The enthusiasm and the energy from the city is quickly what the event is becoming known for," said Dave Gell, a spokesman for the event.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | September 19, 2009
In the summer of 1970, my father and I took a Sunday drive along Falls Road and encountered a fledging enterprise known as the Baltimore Streetcar Museum. A group of streetcar enthusiasts had made good on their determination to preserve and run some of Baltimore's revered transit vehicles of the previous 100 years. That day, we watched in amazement as aged streetcars appeared. And each year, these volunteers at the museum extended the overhead wires and the rails a little more along Falls Road into the Jones Falls Valley.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | July 25, 2009
Devotees of the world's most popular sport descended Friday on Baltimore, filling sidewalks and tailgating lots with Chelsea blue and AC Milan red-and-black in a city more accustomed to pigskin. The European soccer clubs that faced off in a much-hyped match are "the cream of the crop," said Jeff Bondura, a construction worker from Baltimore, who awaited the event in the shadow of M&T Bank Stadium as his sons and their friends played a soccer scrimmage in Lot N. The two prestigious teams found a receptive audience in a town where most fans this time of year are either grousing about another lost Orioles season or growing antsy for the start of Ravens training camp in Westminster.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | December 29, 1995
There is real hunger on the streets of Baltimore: 28 willing Democrats in the queue for Kweisi Mfume's old seat.If Israeli and Syrian diplomats cannot make peace on the banks of Wye River, at least they should bag a few geese.Kevorkian (assisted suicides) is not Kerkorian (assisted bankruptcies).Every day the ice is a little less and a little worse, and this will only get more so until it is gone.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 18, 1995
The Easter Parade at the Inner Harbor is great. The tail end needs attention.The rich are getting richer and the poor poorer and the gap is growing but -- just ask Newt -- it's not enough.If there were no nuclear non-proliferation treaty, we couldn't get one. Soon there won't be, and we won't.Senator Dole threatens not to let the nomination of Dr. Foster for surgeon general come to the floor of the Senate. Until after the last Republican presidential primary.The streets of Baltimore are safe.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Peter.hermann@baltsun.com | July 23, 2009
The mourners tried to set seven white candles on the dried blood that had spilled on Kenwood Avenue. Some fell down before they could be lit; the flames quickly blew out on the others, snuffed out in the stiff breeze much like the young life they had gathered to remember. Jerrod Reed, all of 16, just back from a trip to Miami, was hit in the head by a bullet while standing on an East Baltimore street corner, Kenwood and Madison, a few blocks from where he had lived with his older sister, grandmother and an assortment of other relatives.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | April 26, 2009
A nyone looking for Marcus Antwan Pearson knew to find him on the edge of Normal Avenue, a small, hopeless stretch of one-way street pointing toward Harford Road in North Baltimore. Here, he dealt crack cocaine alongside other young men in T-shirts and baggy jeans, red bandannas hanging like flags from their back pockets. In a day, he could make $1,700, which he spent on cheap hotels and feel-good highs from Ecstasy, marijuana and women. Pearson had grown up tall - 6-foot-2 - and narrow in East Baltimore, where he was born.
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