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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com | January 17, 2010
The problem: An alley in Northeast Baltimore lacks streetlights. The back story: Alverta Furman and her daughter, Mary, have been calling Watchdog for months about the lack of streetlights in the alley behind their home in the 5300 block of Catalpha Road, in the Harford-Echodale-Perring Parkway community. Without the lights, they say, they have been the victims of property crimes such as theft. Alverta Furman said her car's license plates were stolen in November, and someone also took her copper gutters.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 21, 2012
Now let me see if I understand this: The city is replacing sodium-vapor lamps with LED lamps. The estimated savings to the city is $1.9 million annually. ("LEDs come to city streetlights," Aug. 17.) In reality, it will be more like a savings of $900,000. Of course, the cost of the new LED lamp fixtures need to be incorporated into the calculations. BG&E will complain to the PSC that they can't survive with the $1.9 million in reduced revenue. BG&E will raise rates to residents to offset the $1.9 million revenue decrease.
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NEWS
August 21, 2012
Now let me see if I understand this: The city is replacing sodium-vapor lamps with LED lamps. The estimated savings to the city is $1.9 million annually. ("LEDs come to city streetlights," Aug. 17.) In reality, it will be more like a savings of $900,000. Of course, the cost of the new LED lamp fixtures need to be incorporated into the calculations. BG&E will complain to the PSC that they can't survive with the $1.9 million in reduced revenue. BG&E will raise rates to residents to offset the $1.9 million revenue decrease.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
Going block by block, crews in bucket trucks are converting 70,000 city streetlights from sodium vapor lights to long-lasting, energy-saving LEDs. The bright side: Baltimore expects to reap an annual savings of $1.9 million on its electric bill and $275,000 in maintenance costs. Also, advocates say the lights produce less glare and are more focused, meaning less light pollution that drowns out the night stars and can disrupt ecosystems. The dimmer side: Critics say the new lights don't illuminate the area as well.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | May 22, 2011
It's the kind of happy, green energy story that Baltimore Gas & Electric claims to love. Baltimore officials want to replace the city's conventional streetlights with long-life, super-efficient bulbs using light-emitting diodes. LEDs could cut power use and carbon emissions by more than a third, make Baltimore a conservation pioneer and eventually save more than $7 million a year for a city that plans to lay off teachers and could use the dough. But Baltimore officials say BGE has blocked the move with bogus claims that their plan is unsafe.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 13, 2008
Maybe you don't remember, but last year I wrote a postcard about local efforts to protect the nesting sea turtles that were being lured away from Fort Lauderdale Beach by bright streetlights. Local officials moved to ease problem, placing black canvas hoods on 220 streetlights to reduce the glare and keep the turtles on the sand, where they lay their eggs. If only we could find such a simple solution for Maryland's male turtle problem, but maybe things will get better during the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament.
NEWS
October 22, 2006
Watchdog, a new weekly feature that runs Tuesdays in the Maryland section, holds government agencies accountable for problems occurring in the metro area, including Howard County, such as missing street signs, broken water mains, traffic signals or burned out streetlights. Please call us at 410-332-6735 and leave a message or e-mail us at watchdog@baltsun.com. A reporter and a photographer might contact you to follow up on your complaint.
NEWS
By Michael Madden | January 26, 2011
Yes, Virginia, there is a Poe Toaster. Now that smoke from the supposed failure of the Poe Toaster to materialize on Jan. 19 has cleared, it is time to consider the fundamental question: Did the Poe Toaster appear, or not? I was among the crowd gathered outside the graveyard at Baltimore's Westminster Hall, hoping for a glimpse of the Poe Toaster — the mysterious visitor who, since 1949, had crept unnoticed into the ancient graveyard on that date, leaving cognac and flowers on the grave of Edgar Allan Poe. The conditions could not have been in better harmony with the event, the wet streets reflecting the dull yellow glare of the streetlights and bathing the entire scene in a Victorian, gas-lit hue. The crowd, however, was solemn — subdued not by the rain or the cold but by the Toaster's unexplained failure to appear the previous year.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | May 22, 2011
It's the kind of happy, green energy story that Baltimore Gas & Electric claims to love. Baltimore officials want to replace the city's conventional streetlights with long-life, super-efficient bulbs using light-emitting diodes. LEDs could cut power use and carbon emissions by more than a third, make Baltimore a conservation pioneer and eventually save more than $7 million a year for a city that plans to lay off teachers and could use the dough. But Baltimore officials say BGE has blocked the move with bogus claims that their plan is unsafe.
NEWS
By Michael Madden | January 26, 2011
Yes, Virginia, there is a Poe Toaster. Now that smoke from the supposed failure of the Poe Toaster to materialize on Jan. 19 has cleared, it is time to consider the fundamental question: Did the Poe Toaster appear, or not? I was among the crowd gathered outside the graveyard at Baltimore's Westminster Hall, hoping for a glimpse of the Poe Toaster — the mysterious visitor who, since 1949, had crept unnoticed into the ancient graveyard on that date, leaving cognac and flowers on the grave of Edgar Allan Poe. The conditions could not have been in better harmony with the event, the wet streets reflecting the dull yellow glare of the streetlights and bathing the entire scene in a Victorian, gas-lit hue. The crowd, however, was solemn — subdued not by the rain or the cold but by the Toaster's unexplained failure to appear the previous year.
NEWS
July 2, 2010
The problem: When a leaning street lamp was removed in Northeast Baltimore, a one-way sign went with it. The back story: There were many casualties of the snowstorms that slammed Baltimore in February, but the one-way sign behind Bon Mikulka's house was collateral damage. Mikulka lives on Harford Road at Orlando Avenue, and the streetlight that illuminates the alley behind his house frequently takes a beating. "People always take the corner too shortly," he said.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com | January 17, 2010
The problem: An alley in Northeast Baltimore lacks streetlights. The back story: Alverta Furman and her daughter, Mary, have been calling Watchdog for months about the lack of streetlights in the alley behind their home in the 5300 block of Catalpha Road, in the Harford-Echodale-Perring Parkway community. Without the lights, they say, they have been the victims of property crimes such as theft. Alverta Furman said her car's license plates were stolen in November, and someone also took her copper gutters.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | February 1, 2009
THE PROBLEM: Lights at a Northwest Baltimore shopping plaza have been dark for months. THE BACKSTORY : Watchdog readers often draw attention to unlit street lamps in their neighborhoods. But Shirley Clinton had an unusual problem because her immediate environs include the shopping center across the street from her apartment complex. Clinton is president of the tenants association at the Reisterstown Square Apartments on Eberle Drive. The entrance to the apartment complex faces a Home Depot in Reisterstown Plaza.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | October 19, 2008
The problem: A streetlight near Coppin State University stayed lit only intermittently. The backstory : Sheila Carr wrote to Watchdog last month about a recurring problem. A streetlight near her home in the 1700 block of Ruxton Ave. was dark all too often, she said. Sometimes it would light for only a few minutes; other times it was out for days. "Some days it's on, and sometimes it's off," Carr said. "If you come home after dark, it just makes you feel very uncomfortable." She and her neighbors had resorted to leaving their porch lights on at night to ward off drug dealers or homeless people.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 13, 2008
Maybe you don't remember, but last year I wrote a postcard about local efforts to protect the nesting sea turtles that were being lured away from Fort Lauderdale Beach by bright streetlights. Local officials moved to ease problem, placing black canvas hoods on 220 streetlights to reduce the glare and keep the turtles on the sand, where they lay their eggs. If only we could find such a simple solution for Maryland's male turtle problem, but maybe things will get better during the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament.
NEWS
December 10, 2006
Watchdog, a new weekly feature that runs Tuesdays in the Maryland section, holds government agencies accountable for problems such as missing street signs, broken water mains, malfunctioning traffic signals or burned-out streetlights that occur in the metro area - including Anne Arundel County. If you notice a problem, please call us at 410-332-6735 and leave a message or e-mail us at watchdog@baltsun.com. A reporter and a photographer might contact you to follow up on your complaint.
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