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By Karin Remesch | December 6, 1998
Mission: Founded in 1966, three years after the last streetcar ran in the city, the Baltimore Streetcar Museum is an all-volunteer, nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving and promoting the history of Baltimore's street railways. The museum is home to more than a dozen vintage Baltimore street railway vehicles, ranging from the first horsecar, which inaugurated rail service in 1859, to the last car on the streets in 1963. The museum provides streetcar rides (about half the collection is restored and operating)
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Carvey G. Davis Jr., a former Baltimore Transit Co. motorman who never lost his affection for streetcars and was a longtime supporter and benefactor of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died of bone cancer Saturday at his Glen Burnie home. He was 90. "Some of Carvey's fondest memories were running and riding streetcars," said John O'Neill, longtime Baltimore Streetcar Museum president, who lives in Jarrettsville. "He was the ultimate rail fan and the last link for all of us to the great era of Baltimore streetcars," said Martin K. Van Horn, a Pennsylvania Railroad historian and streetcar museum member.
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NEWS
June 15, 1997
The decomposed body of an unidentified black female was discovered at midafternoon yesterday by city police behind the Baltimore Streetcar Museum at 1911 Falls Road.A police spokeswoman said officers were called to the scene after a museum official complained of a strong, unexplained odor. Police found the body on a green blanket.The state medical examiner's office said that an autopsy would be conducted today. Officials were not able to estimate the age of the woman.Pub Date: 6/15/97
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
George J. Voith, a retired CSX executive and noted rail and streetcar photographer who was a founding member of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died Monday of dementia at his Northwood home. He was 87. "George is one of the last of the original guys who founded the Baltimore Streetcar Museum. He was a wonderful fellow," said John O'Neil Jr., museum president. "I first met him when I joined the museum in 1971. He was a good mentor for young members, whom he took under his wing and he urged to take on more responsibilities," said Mr. O'Neil.
NEWS
January 31, 1998
MUCH OF Baltimore's growth and initial suburbanization was facilitated by an effective and efficient system of streetcar lines. Thirty lines, employing some 2,000 cars, whisked commuters throughout the region. All that ended in the early hours of Nov. 3, 1963, when the last car on the famous No. 8 route from Catonsville to Towson made its final run.This rich history is documented by the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, which possesses 18 irreplaceable, vintage pieces of rolling stock.That 32-year-old institution is now at a crossroads.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1997
For years Clyde L. Gerald, with his blue wheelbarrow, pick and shovel, was a familiar sight to early morning commuters zipping along Falls Road as they passed the Baltimore Streetcar Museum.During the coldest weather or the hottest days, Mr. Gerald, who was known as the "Human Steam Shovel," could be seen feverishly grading soil for new trolley trackage or laying ties.Mr. Gerald, a founder of the museum in 1963, died June 16 of a heart attack at his home in Upton, Mass. He was 79.A retired engineer, Mr. Gerald, who returned to Upton last year, had lived in Baltimore since 1940, when he came to work for Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River.
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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 17, 1996
On Nov. 3, 1963, streetcar service ceased in Baltimore after 100 years of operation, and as Charles R. Lloyd rode one of the last cars into the Irvington carbarn that day, the old motorman's heart sank.The former Baltimore Transit Co. worker would wait nearly three decades for streetcars to return to the city with the opening of light rail in 1992. Until then, he satisfied his yearning for the thrill of urban rail traffic by helping to found the Baltimore Streetcar Museum in 1966.Known as "Dick," the former Charles Village resident died of heart failure Monday at Oak Crest Village retirement community in Parkville, where he had moved several weeks ago. He was 70.Mr.
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By Stephen Henderson and Stephen Henderson,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1998
A hundred years ago, Streetcar No. 1050 trundled through the streets of Baltimore, ferrying commuters and pleasure-seekers from Roland Park -- then part of Baltimore County -- to the city's old Riverside waterfront amusement park and points in between.Yesterday afternoon, that same streetcar -- squeaky but intact, dingy but sporting many of its original fittings and ornamentation -- was taking on passengers as visitors to the Baltimore Streetcar Museum celebrated its centennial birthday."We've preserved as much of it as we could," museum curator Benjamin Bates said while standing in the aisle of the car and moving his hand across its original maple veneer ceiling.
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1998
A potential new developer has emerged for the Barre Station property in Southwest Baltimore, an 8-acre parcel where Ryland Homes and Otis Warren Development backed out of plans this year to build more than 100 townhouses.Metroventures/USA Inc., a 6-year-old development company based in Columbia, submitted a plan this spring to build Scott's Landing, an $18.6 million community with 144 townhouses priced at no more than $105,000.If it moves ahead, it would be one of the city's largest private housing ventures in years, on one of the few large tracts of land available for residential development close to downtown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By CRYSTAL WILLIAMS | June 22, 2000
`Light the Night' Always wanted to ride on a camel? Well, now's your chance. The Baltimore Zoo is the place for the Maryland Society for Sight's "Light the Night for Sight" walkathon Saturday. The event, which benefits the society's sight-saving programs, includes camel rides, contests, a children's petting zoo, raffles, a light barbecue dinner and more. Walkers can also learn about the dangers of firework injuries to the eyes. Walkers raising $50 or more in pledges will receive a free event T-shirt.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
Paul W. Wirtz, former deputy director of facilities engineering at Aberdeen Proving Ground and longtime comptroller and trustee of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died Nov. 4 from multiple organ failure at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The former Roland Park resident was 91. "Paul was a very erudite guy and very learned. He was a world traveler until he became ill," said Andrew S. Blumberg, a member for many years of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, where he is director of public relations.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2011
Earlier this month on an insufferable Baltimore summer's day, the only thing my colleague and friend Jacques Kelly and I wanted after work were a couple of tall cool gin-and-tonics. And in pursuit of those wonderful English Raj heat beaters, our journey to McCabe's took us out Falls Road. As we came abreast of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, there sitting in the middle of the North Avenue streetcar loop, chained to a piece of track fixed aboard a flatbed truck, was a harbinger of winter.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 11, 2011
James C. Robertson Jr., a retired Baltimore police officer and a streetcar buff who was a longtime active member of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died Saturday of respiratory failure at the Oak Crest Village retirement community. He was 100. The son of a physician and a homemaker, Mr. Robertson was born in Baltimore and raised at the foot of Broadway and later in a rowhouse near Patterson Park. He was a 1929 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree in history and political science in 1935 from the University of Maryland, College Park, where he also played varsity football.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 4, 2011
Harry G. Gesser Jr., a retired Bendix Radio engineering draftsman and a lifelong rail and streetcar fan, died March 16 of kidney and heart failure at St. Agnes Hospital. The former longtime Woodlawn resident was 85. Mr. Gesser was born in Baltimore and raised in West Arlington. After graduating from Forest Park High School in 1943, he began his career working for Bendix on East Joppa Road in Towson. He entered the Navy in 1945 and, after serving for a year, resumed his career as an engineering draftsman.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
John Stearns Thomsen, a retired Johns Hopkins University physicist who was a founder of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died of respiratory failure Wednesday at his North Roland Park home. He was 88. Born in Baltimore and raised on Mount Royal Terrace in Reservoir Hill, he was a 1939 Boys' Latin School graduate. A year later, he joined the National Railway Historical Society and remained a train and streetcar aficionado throughout his life. He earned a bachelor's degree in engineering from Hopkins.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | January 13, 2010
Henry S. Wells Jr., a founding member of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum whose love of streetcars and trains defined his life, died in his sleep Saturday at his nephew's home in Manassas, Va. He was 95. Mr. Wells was born in Baltimore and, before moving to his nephew's home in 2003, spent his entire life in a rowhouse in the 1900 block of Mount Royal Terrace, on Reservoir Hill, which gave him a front-row seat as a child watching No. 13 streetcars as...
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1997
James L. Larduskey Jr., a utility official and curator of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died of heart failure Friday on his 79th birthday.A Roland Park resident, Mr. Larduskey retired as chief of traffic and expediting for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. in 1971. He joined the utility's electrical testing department in 1948.His infatuation with streetcars began as a youngster, when he rode the various routes, exploring the city, according to family members.A member of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum since 1970, and holder of badge No. 278, Mr. Larduskey had been a former board member, motorman and conductor and, at the time of his death, was the museum's curator.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1998
To make the leap from a weekend hobby club to downtown tourist attraction, the Baltimore Streetcar Museum is depending on the political savvy and generosity of longtime Annapolis lobbyist Bruce C. Bereano.The 52-year-old Bereano, a friend of museum director John C. O'Neill, has been donating his time to the trolley exhibit for about three years.In 1996, the New York-born attorney helped get a $190,000 bond bill passed for the museum. The all-volunteer organization, which intends to use the money to plan for relocation and expansion, was given two years to spend the cash.
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