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NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 2004
IT'S FUNNY how some people - myself included - can drive around for years, wondering why Howard County street signs are color-coded without trying to find the answer. Karen Gilbert isn't one of them. "The street signs in the Columbia area are different colors - some green, some brown, some blue," Gilbert said. "At the corner of Eden Brook and Guilford Road, the Guilford Road sign is green on one side of the street and blue on the other. What is the significance of the different colors?"
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
Raymond Ellis Thompson, a retired foundry worker active in the Oliver neighborhood, died of cancer Jan. 15 at his East Baltimore home. He was 91. Born in Baltimore and raised on Bond Street, he was the son of Edward Thompson, a laborer, and Emma Milburn Thompson, a housekeeper and baker. He attended School 113 and Dunbar Junior-Senior High School. While at school, he met his future wife, Geneva Davis. As a young man, he worked at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He enlisted in the Navy during World War II. After the war, he joined American Smelting and Refining Co. in Southeast Baltimore, where he worked until the plant closed in the 1970s.
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NEWS
By TYRONE RICHARDSON and TYRONE RICHARDSON,SUN REPORTER | December 7, 2005
Responding to laments from frustrated motorists, Howard County public works officials gradually are replacing Columbia's distinctive - but hard-to-read - street signs with rectangular signs that have a more traditional design. The changes, which allow for larger print than the older, box-like signs, are in line with signage recommendations from a federal government manual and may be especially welcome for older drivers who complain about difficulty reading the current signs on the fly. "This was primarily done to get the letter-size larger, and the visibility is so much better," said Mark DeLuca, chief of the traffic engineering division of the Howard County Department of Public Works.
EXPLORE
December 1, 2012
Everybody knows that Tom Booth loved his family and friends. He also loved doing business in Catonsville. Since its beginning, Tom was an active member of the Catonsville Chamber of Commerce. As a builder and developer for many years, Tom contributed to the Catonsville landscape. He was a good guy, a straight shooter and a kind soul. The street signage "Tom Booth Way" will permanently honor his memory and decades of accomplishments that helped make Catonsville a better place to live.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2000
A Harford County teen-ager was arrested in connection with a three-hour rampage in a subdivision near Bel Air early yesterday, in which as many as 75 mailboxes and street signs were destroyed by a minivan, police said. The Bel Air teen was arrested at 3:10 a.m. and charged with driving while intoxicated and malicious destruction of property, said Lt. Edward Hopkins, spokesman for the Harford County sheriff's office. The 17-year-old, whose name was withheld because he is a juvenile, was charged with 35 counts of vandalism, Hopkins said.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1996
Street signs marking Paradise Avenue in Mount Airy seem to fly off the posts. "Children at Play" is another favorite of the "collectors," who have been ripping off an average of two street signs a month in town.The thefts have made Town Councilman Norman C. Hammond so angry that he is offering a $15 reward for returned signs, no questions asked. The Town Council agreed last month to give $100 to anyone who provides the names of sign thieves and locations of stolen signs.In the year since Hammond began offering the $15 reward, he has paid $15, for one returned parking sign.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | February 22, 2009
THE PROBLEM : A missing street sign in Essex caused residents to miss deliveries and visitors. THE BACKSTORY : Roxanne Fleming doesn't know what happened to the sign. She lives on the northern leg of West Road, toward Hopkins Creek off Middleborough Road in Essex. The sign marking her street - and alerting drivers to the dead end - disappeared over the summer. Fleming called to report the problem, because without the sign people were getting lost. That section of West Road is offset from the part running roughly south off Middleborough Road, so the family's guests have missed the intersection.
NEWS
May 10, 2012
Now there are six councilmen known to have taken football game tickets from developers, along with Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, who says the tickets he got were "for his wife" ("Councilman took football tickets from developer," May 9). According to Don Mohler, Mr. Kamenetz' chief of staff, the county plans to update its ethics law soon to comply with state guidelines. Will it also comply with county laws it has ignored, such as its refusal to comply with zoning laws in one neighborhood and its refusal to enforce the posted street signs, which has put the lives of residents at risk?
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1995
The County Council cannot reverse its decision to spend $200,000 to replace thousands of street signs, even though lawmakers say a public works administrator "lied" to them before their vote."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1998
City police requested help from the Maryland State Police yesterday to determine whether a mechanical defect caused a taxicab to jump a curb in Northeast Baltimore on Wednesday morning and hit five people on a sidewalk.Sgt. Mark E. Howe, a department spokesman, said the 1991 Ford Crown Victoria owned by Yellow Van Service has been impounded at a city police lot.Howe said that city traffic investigators will wait until mechanical tests are completed on the car before determining a cause.The driver, Larry Dean Hall, 43, told investigators that his gas pedal had stuck to the floor, causing the sedan to careen down a sidewalk in the 2600 block of Harford Road.
EXPLORE
September 19, 2012
On Sept. 13, the Arbutus Business and Professional Association celebrated the completion of the Leeds Avenue repaving project and the beginning of the East Drive repaving project with County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, many elected officials and community leaders. I love Arbutus! It's full of hard working people, entrepreneurs and businesses. We have elected officials with their behind-the-scenes people who work tirelessly for us, and community associations who support us. We have an Ice Cream Cottage, town hall, lots of fun eateries and our very own neighborhood movie theater.
NEWS
May 10, 2012
Now there are six councilmen known to have taken football game tickets from developers, along with Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, who says the tickets he got were "for his wife" ("Councilman took football tickets from developer," May 9). According to Don Mohler, Mr. Kamenetz' chief of staff, the county plans to update its ethics law soon to comply with state guidelines. Will it also comply with county laws it has ignored, such as its refusal to comply with zoning laws in one neighborhood and its refusal to enforce the posted street signs, which has put the lives of residents at risk?
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2011
The problem: Street lights and directional signs remain dark in West Baltimore. The back story: Harry E. Bennett Jr. regularly travels from his home in Sandtown-Winchester to Westview Park to go bowling. For months, he's been troubled by the dark street signs in his neighborhood. At two intersections, lights have been dim on two green overhead signs — like the kind you see on highways — that direct drivers around the "Highway to Nowhere. " The signs are located on North Fulton Street, guiding drivers onto westbound Franklin Street, and on westbound Mulberry Street, to North Monroe Street.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2011
There's no verdict yet in the trial of the pit bull that came to be known as Phoenix, but I say: guilty. No, not Travers and Tremayne Johnson, the 18-year-old twins accused of torching the dog on a West Baltimore street in 2009. She was burned so horribly that she had to be put down several days later. I have no idea if the Johnson brothers did it, or, rather, whether the prosecutors sufficiently proved their case or fell short, as the defense contends. Anyone who has been a juror knows how hard it can be to come up with a verdict in that jury room — much harder than coming up with an opinion out here in the peanut gallery.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com | February 22, 2010
Ryan Boddy was following instructions. After back-to-back snowstorms, Boddy dug out his wife's car on Calvert Street in Mount Vernon, a snow emergency route. Posted signs state cars would be towed from 9 p.m. to 9 a.m. on the east side of the street, and from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on the west side, so he parked it on the east side the morning of Feb. 11. Still, he walked out a few hours later and found the vehicle had been towed. Boddy said he understood that this was an unprecedented storm and "it makes sense that they wouldn't have this down to a science."
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | February 22, 2009
THE PROBLEM : A missing street sign in Essex caused residents to miss deliveries and visitors. THE BACKSTORY : Roxanne Fleming doesn't know what happened to the sign. She lives on the northern leg of West Road, toward Hopkins Creek off Middleborough Road in Essex. The sign marking her street - and alerting drivers to the dead end - disappeared over the summer. Fleming called to report the problem, because without the sign people were getting lost. That section of West Road is offset from the part running roughly south off Middleborough Road, so the family's guests have missed the intersection.
FEATURES
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | November 11, 1991
Ewell -- FIRST THEY were told to register their cars and trucks, even though they have less than three miles of paved roads to travel.Then they were informed that a public restroom would be built in their midst for the pleasure of the tourists who come to gawk at their homes and boats.And now they are being asked to refer to the lanes where they live by the names on the new street signs the county recently erected.Ah, what price civilization? Today street signs. Tomorrow speed bumps?No more is it just "front road" for the main artery that runs along the waterfront in the largest of three villages on Smith Island.
NEWS
September 18, 1993
In New York City, officials tired of replacing street signs from such famous thoroughfares as Broadway and Wall Street decided to manufacture replicas to sell as souvenirs. What began as an effort to counteract petty vandals has earned the city's Department of Transportation $60,000 over the past two years.Rather than paying to have several tons of animal waste carted away each day, the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle simply composts the stuff and markets it to gardeners as "ZooDoo," earning $20,000 a year for the city's general fund.
NEWS
By TYRONE RICHARDSON and TYRONE RICHARDSON,SUN REPORTER | December 7, 2005
Responding to laments from frustrated motorists, Howard County public works officials gradually are replacing Columbia's distinctive - but hard-to-read - street signs with rectangular signs that have a more traditional design. The changes, which allow for larger print than the older, box-like signs, are in line with signage recommendations from a federal government manual and may be especially welcome for older drivers who complain about difficulty reading the current signs on the fly. "This was primarily done to get the letter-size larger, and the visibility is so much better," said Mark DeLuca, chief of the traffic engineering division of the Howard County Department of Public Works.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 2004
IT'S FUNNY how some people - myself included - can drive around for years, wondering why Howard County street signs are color-coded without trying to find the answer. Karen Gilbert isn't one of them. "The street signs in the Columbia area are different colors - some green, some brown, some blue," Gilbert said. "At the corner of Eden Brook and Guilford Road, the Guilford Road sign is green on one side of the street and blue on the other. What is the significance of the different colors?"
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