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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun reporter | May 4, 2007
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Street Sense emerged from Barn 26 in the Churchill Downs stable area with his ears pricked forward and his eyes taking in the crowd that was watching his every move. As the 3-year-old star moved toward the racetrack, the crowd followed along behind him until the horse suddenly just stopped. Street Sense paused and then turned his head around to look back at the entourage. Oh, if horses could only talk. Well, they do talk, trainer Carl Nafzger said. But evidently they only talk to the people who take care of them.
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NEWS
May 25, 2011
As a self-proclaimed "horse fanatic," nothing infuriates me more than the harassment and degradation suffered at the hands of all the police and security teams that blanketed Pimlico last Saturday at the Preakness. Having traveled to phenomenal racing facilities around the country, from Keeneland to Monmouth Park, I've always been treated with respect and given the opportunity to enjoy a great day of racing without feeling like a criminal. The trend that has developed at Preakness the past two years has been exactly the opposite.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun reporter | June 1, 2007
With no possibility of winning the Triple Crown, Street Sense will not be asked to take on the endurance test of the Belmont Stakes, the third leg of racing's Triple Crown. During a morning news conference at Churchill Downs yesterday, trainer Carl Nafzger said Street Sense's owner and breeder, Jim Tafel, had decided to skip the Belmont. Instead, the horse will be pointed toward a late-summer and fall campaign that could make the son of Street Cry the only horse in history to win the Breeders' Cup Juvenile, the Kentucky Derby, the Travers and the Breeders' Cup Classic.
SPORTS
May 9, 2010
Even after three Kentucky Derby victories in four years, one can still make the case that Calvin Borel isn't the best jockey in the country. But two things cannot be disputed about the 43-year-old Louisiana native, who will try to win his second consecutive Preakness Stakes this week at Pimlico Race Course: No one in his profession is more fearless, and no one is more polite. That might seem, at first, like an odd juxtaposition. But when you witness Borel on a day when he's at his best, as he clearly was May 1 when he rode Super Saver on a rail-hugging trip around Churchill Downs to victory in the 136th Run for the Roses, you see how perfectly the description fits.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and sun reporter | May 20, 2007
Coming down the frontstretch, the nine-horse race for victory in the 132nd Preakness at Pimlico Race Course yesterday turned into a match race. Kentucky Derby champion Street Sense had burst past Curlin in the final turn and reeled in Hard Spun and looked as if he would win as they came down the stretch. But Curlin wasn't finished, and when Street Sense jockey Calvin Borel looked back under his right arm, what he saw gave him chills. Curlin was coming, pounding back, pulling up beside him so close the jockeys' stirrups all but touched.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,[Sun reporter] | October 28, 2007
OCEANPORT, N.J. --There they were, the three superstars of the 3-year-old class, coming down the stretch, sloshing through the mud that was so saturated it was called sloppy, separating themselves from the rest of the field in the $5 million Breeders' Cup Classic. And when the race was over, it was the amazing Curlin who emerged victorious in a Monmouth Park track record-tying time of 2 minutes, .59 of a second, with Hard Spun 4 1/2 lengths back. Kentucky Derby winner Street Sense, the betting favorite, finished fourth, one length behind Awesome Gem, a 4-year-old who used the race's speed to generate one big closing run for third . "I've been watching horse racing since 1939," said Jess Jackson, who owns Curlin with Satish Sanan and George Bolton, a Baltimore native.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN REPORTER | May 17, 2007
Trainer Carl Nafzger was pacing like an expectant father in the stakes barn area of Pimlico Race Course, awaiting the arrival of Street Sense yesterday. Nafzger had driven from Kentucky to Maryland with his wife, Wanda, ahead of the flight carrying the Kentucky Derby victor while the threat of a thunderstorm loomed in the area and was relieved when Street Sense arrived and was led safely to Stall 40. "He let down. He's nice and quiet," said the trainer before he was whisked away by a driver to the post-position draw in the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN REPORTER | May 20, 2007
The favorites staged a thrilling finish under rainy skies at Pimlico yesterday as a record crowd of 121,263 leaped to their feet to watch the 132nd Preakness unfold. Hard-charging Curlin passed Kentucky Derby winner Street Sense by a head to win the race in record-tying time and eliminate the prospect for a Triple Crown winner in 2007. Street Sense passed Hard Spun, ridden by Maryland's Mario Pino, early in the stretch. The colt looked as if he would hold off a rally by Curlin. But Curlin, who stumbled out of the starting gate, roared up on the outside and passed.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun reporter | May 16, 2007
The owners of Circular Quay informed Pimlico Race Course officials yesterday that their horse will run in Saturday's Preakness, bringing the field to nine. Sixth in the Kentucky Derby, Circular Quay joins King of the Roxy as entrants to be saddled by trainer Todd Pletcher, who has started only one horse in a Preakness, Impeachment, the third-place finisher in 2000. Bloodstock agent Demi O'Byrne and owners Michael and Doreen Tabor made arrangements for Circular Quay, the Louisiana Derby winner and runner-up to Street Sense in last year's Breeders' Cup Juvenile.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | May 16, 2007
Tears are now a part of horse racing, and we learned just recently that even when old ones dry, new tears inevitably well up. This is why this week isn't really about year-old memories of a fantastic horse named Barbaro and it isn't about the ocean's worth of tears shed on his behalf. If you're looking for someone worth rooting for at Saturday's Preakness, you won't find him in this new batch of 3-year-olds, either, whether you're Flying First Class or you've got a bit of Street Sense.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2010
Even after three Kentucky Derby victories in four years, one can still make the case that Calvin Borel isn't the best jockey in the country. But two things cannot be disputed about the 43-year-old Louisiana native, who will try to win his second consecutive Preakness Stakes this week at Pimlico Race Course: No one in his profession is more fearless, and no one is more polite. That might seem, at first, like an odd juxtaposition. But when you witness Borel on a day when he's at his best, as he clearly was May 1 when he rode Super Saver on a rail-hugging trip around Churchill Downs to victory in the 136th Run for the Roses, you see how perfectly the description fits.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,[Sun Reporter] | March 1, 2008
It's been so long since the Towson stretch of York Road has been a bustling shopping area, you may have forgotten there's anywhere else to shop but Towson Town Center. Not so. True, York Road looks a little like Main Street in Small Town America these days, with many storefronts deserted and boarded up. But if you get out of your car and walk up and down York and its cross streets, you'll find some great stores, many small eating places and more day spas and salons than you can shake a stick at. Why not spend part of an afternoon exploring the Other Towson?
SPORTS
January 22, 2008
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. -- Preakness and Breeders' Cup Classic winner Curlin swept Horse of the Year and 3-year-old male honors at the 37th annual Eclipse Awards last night. Curlin overwhelmed the competition in Horse of the Year voting, receiving 249 first-place votes to 12 for Belmont Stakes winner Rags to Riches. Last year's winner, Invasor, earned two votes. Corinthian, English Channel and Kentucky Derby winner Street Sense received one each in balloting by the National Thoroughbred Racing Association, Daily Racing Form and National Turf Writers Association.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | October 29, 2007
OCEANPORT, N.J. -- The day after Curlin won the Breeders' Cup Classic against his two toughest rivals, Street Sense and Hard Spun, to lock up Horse of the Year honors, the big red horse's future is unknown. Will he race at age 4 or will he go to a breeding farm - like Street Sense and Hard Spun will tomorrow - and perhaps become the beginning of a stronger, more durable breed of horse? "We're still on cloud nine, so I don't think I can make a rational decision right now," said Jess Jackson, who owns Curlin with Satish Sanan and George Bolton.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,[Sun reporter] | October 28, 2007
OCEANPORT, N.J. --There they were, the three superstars of the 3-year-old class, coming down the stretch, sloshing through the mud that was so saturated it was called sloppy, separating themselves from the rest of the field in the $5 million Breeders' Cup Classic. And when the race was over, it was the amazing Curlin who emerged victorious in a Monmouth Park track record-tying time of 2 minutes, .59 of a second, with Hard Spun 4 1/2 lengths back. Kentucky Derby winner Street Sense, the betting favorite, finished fourth, one length behind Awesome Gem, a 4-year-old who used the race's speed to generate one big closing run for third . "I've been watching horse racing since 1939," said Jess Jackson, who owns Curlin with Satish Sanan and George Bolton, a Baltimore native.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2007
OCEANPORT, N.J. -- As the trainers of the nine entries in the Breeders' Cup Classic hunkered down in their barns yesterday and looked out through fog and mist at a sloppy track, it seemed a cruel trick. For months, the weather has been warm and dry at Monmouth Park as the best horses in the country and the world built their cases for entry into today's Breeders' Cup races. And when the field for the $5 million Classic was set, it was described by many longtime observers as the best in the event's 23-year history.
SPORTS
May 5, 2007
GOOD MORNING -- STREET SENSE -- 2006 Preakness winner Bernardini also started as post position No. 8
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2007
OCEANPORT, N.J. -- Hard Spun and his jockey Mario Pino are a perfect match. According to his jockey, the horse - running in tomorrow's Breeders' Cup Classic - does not get the respect he deserves. According to Hard Spun's trainer, the jockey does not get the recognition he deserves. "People keep saying I'm using a little-known jockey," said trainer Larry Jones, puzzlement showing in his face. "Mario's [four] wins from 6,000. He's one of the top 15 riders in the history of the game. He's one of the most experienced riders there is. He's the second-winningest on the active list.
NEWS
June 12, 2007
Forget The Sopranos. Must-see TV last weekend was the Belmont Stakes, the third leg of the most emotionally satisfying Triple Crown series in years. A combination of excellent equine athletes, colorful supporting players and the sheer unpredictability that is horse racing produced a show that gave the sport so important to Maryland a shot in the arm. And, OK, this isn't really about girl power - except perhaps in the most literal sense. But when Rags to Riches dueled Preakness winner Curlin through the Belmont's closing stretch to become the first filly to win the mile-and-a-half classic in 102 years, the nearly three decades without a Triple Crown winner suddenly didn't seem to matter so much.
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