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NEWS
April 21, 1995
The dozen or so "street people" who hang around Westminster seem as much fixtures in the Carroll County seat as any immovable edifice. If they aren't sitting on the benches in front of the county library, you can find them at the planter near Paradiso or perhaps on the steps by Schmitt's Rexall Drugs.The presence of these men and a few women in downtown Westminster has been a nagging problem for merchants, shoppers and residents. They occasionally panhandle, harass passersby, drink alcohol in public, urinate on walls and trees.
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NEWS
March 19, 2013
As a resident of downtown Baltimore, I'm struck by the amenities offered to the homeless ("Aid for street people failing," March 18). There are long lines in front of Health Care for the Homeless on the Fallsway, and it appears My Sister's Place across the street from the Pratt Library's main branch is doing a thriving business. The list goes on and on, so my question is: With so many venues offering assistance, why is homelessness still "epidemic" in Baltimore? Your article failed to investigate the origins of Baltimore's homeless problem.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 27, 2003
SAN FRANCISCO -- The panhandler thrust his Styrofoam cup at Ali Sornkaw, and she dug into her pockets for spare change. A simple and all-too-common urban transaction? Not according to the dueling posters and billboards that have risen over this city in recent months, which would have Sornkaw either engaging in a Christ-like act of charity or helping to spread sexually transmitted diseases. So goes the heated rhetoric as San Francisco wrestles with an increasingly critical problem of homelessness -- as well as its own cherished self-image as a tolerant city.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | March 25, 2006
Pratt Street could be to downtown Baltimore what Michigan Avenue is to Chicago or what 5th Avenue is to New York, a signature street full of street-level shops, outdoor cafes, street performers and even mass transit, a local planning group believes. Redesigned some 40 years ago as part of the Inner Harbor redevelopment with grassy berms meant to separate pedestrians from cars, noise and exhaust fumes, Pratt Street instead has evolved into a main thoroughfare with little to attract foot traffic, said members of the group, which gathered yesterday for a planning charrette led by the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Lyle Denniston is The Sun's legal correspondent in Washington and makes his base at the Supreme Court | October 21, 1990
Life on the streets is often a dreadful trial for the nation's homeless. The street people also have been finding, increasingly, that taking their grievances to court doesn't help much, either. The "homeless rights" movement, it seems, is stalling.With America's growing awareness of the street people and their plight has come, from some quarters at least, a growing sensitivity and sympathy. In a good many cities, getting shelter, food and medical care for the homeless is a serious and sincere civic endeavor.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | April 16, 1995
"We are street people. It's part of our lives. We were born and raised here. How can they change what we are?"The speaker is Roy Lee Spivey, 50, one of about 10 people who usually spend their days hanging out on Main Street. The people who he worries will try to change him and his companions are members of a task force that recently studied the problem of homeless people in downtown Westminster.Longtime residents say Westminster has had street people for many years, but former Mayor W. Benjamin Brown brought the subject to the fore in November 1993, spurred in part by complaints from a Main Street business owner.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | April 16, 1995
"We are street people. It's part of our lives. We were born and raised here. How can they change what we are?"The speaker is Roy Lee Spivey, 50, one of about 10 people who usually spend their days hanging out on Main Street. The people who he worries will try to change him and his companions are members of a task force that recently studied the problem of homeless people in downtown Westminster.Longtime residents say Westminster has had street people for many years, but former Mayor W. Benjamin Brown brought the subject to the fore in November 1993, spurred in part by complaints from a Main Street business owner.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | September 15, 1994
A federal judge yesterday rejected a challenge against the Downtown Partnership in Baltimore, saying its "move-along" lTC policy does not violate the constitutional rights of panhandlers or the homeless.The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) sued last year, saying the policy of police and Downtown Partnership security guards amounted to harassment. Baltimore and its Police Department settled the ACLU's claims with a promise to educate officers and allow the organization to monitor arrests.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | April 25, 1993
More and more the sad faces of street people appear at the Red Door on Cathedral Street; young and old; men, women and children; black and white.To them -- poor, hungry, homeless or maybe just wanting someone to talk to -- Pat Jones is spot of hope in a city drowning in need.For nearly 20 years, Mrs. Jones has been Emmanuel Episcopal Church's social worker, conducting a one-woman "Ministry of the Door."She was invited to Emmanuel, one of the city's oldest churches, in 1974 to work with elderly parishioners.
NEWS
March 19, 2013
As a resident of downtown Baltimore, I'm struck by the amenities offered to the homeless ("Aid for street people failing," March 18). There are long lines in front of Health Care for the Homeless on the Fallsway, and it appears My Sister's Place across the street from the Pratt Library's main branch is doing a thriving business. The list goes on and on, so my question is: With so many venues offering assistance, why is homelessness still "epidemic" in Baltimore? Your article failed to investigate the origins of Baltimore's homeless problem.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 27, 2003
SAN FRANCISCO -- The panhandler thrust his Styrofoam cup at Ali Sornkaw, and she dug into her pockets for spare change. A simple and all-too-common urban transaction? Not according to the dueling posters and billboards that have risen over this city in recent months, which would have Sornkaw either engaging in a Christ-like act of charity or helping to spread sexually transmitted diseases. So goes the heated rhetoric as San Francisco wrestles with an increasingly critical problem of homelessness -- as well as its own cherished self-image as a tolerant city.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - A horror-flick eeriness hangs over 10th and Noble, a gritty corner a few blocks from the majestic City Hall. A railroad trestle looms above the darkened street, a cat skulks through the night. On the damp ground lies a shrouded human form, still as death. "Howdy, howdy," police Officer Joe Corvi shouts gaily into the chilly air as he walks up about 8:15 p.m. "Guess who?" chimes in outreach worker Genny O'Donnell. "Your foul-weather friends." Just then Tia stirs to life and emerges bleary-eyed from under a blanket.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 11, 2000
A CHRISTMAS tree went up near City Hall last week, and the groups who feed hungry street people there got a note from the city telling them to move their operations over by the jail. The city distributed copies of its "winter plan" for the homeless to volunteers who give out sandwiches on Holliday Street, in front of City Hall, each evening. "Effective December 4," the city declared, "street feeding will be conducted at Fallsway and Madison Avenue." That's a city lot by the Jones Falls Expressway, just east and south of the Central Booking and Intake Center, the Mussolini-inspired edifice that has been the focus of Mayor Martin O'Malley's ambitions to more quickly process criminal cases that choke Baltimore's court dockets.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 1, 1999
CHICAGO -- If you pay much attention to the presidential campaign (and these days our numbers seem to me to be remarkably few), you will hear a lot of talk about who is setting the best example for young people.President Clinton's scandal with Monica Lewinsky was a particularly strong issue with Republicans. Some viewed with alarm a front-page Washington Post story last spring about an apparent upsurge in oral sex among students at a local middle school. It quoted one eighth-grade girl as excusing her act with, "President Clinton does it."
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1998
They beamed and wept, lingering over plush rose carpeting, marveling at the size of their walk-in closets, fingering brass doorknobs.These places are where their children will grow up, where daughters will one day dress for weddings, where they will celebrate every Christmas, where they likely will grow old.Home.The smiles and tears belong to 27 Baltimore families, as do the homes to which they received the keys yesterday -- homes built by volunteers, workers and the families themselves on block-long Leslie Street in the Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood.
NEWS
By Michael Lewis | October 1, 1996
THE POOR PEOPLE in my Manhattan neighborhood long ago discovered workfare: those who remain on welfare supplement their stipends by collecting tin cans and glass bottles and returning them to the receptacle at the Key Foods on the corner, which pays them a nickel a throw.The free-lance recycling business has become the leading street industry in New York, and for all I know the rest of the country; all over the city you now find people -- most of whom are homeless -- pushing shopping carts overflowing with cans and bottles.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 11, 2000
A CHRISTMAS tree went up near City Hall last week, and the groups who feed hungry street people there got a note from the city telling them to move their operations over by the jail. The city distributed copies of its "winter plan" for the homeless to volunteers who give out sandwiches on Holliday Street, in front of City Hall, each evening. "Effective December 4," the city declared, "street feeding will be conducted at Fallsway and Madison Avenue." That's a city lot by the Jones Falls Expressway, just east and south of the Central Booking and Intake Center, the Mussolini-inspired edifice that has been the focus of Mayor Martin O'Malley's ambitions to more quickly process criminal cases that choke Baltimore's court dockets.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff | December 21, 1995
HOLIDAY GIFTS come in all shapes and sizes, but few are as unusual as the one Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke will open at 11 a.m.today.Oasis Station is the name of a drop-in center for homeless people that has been created at 222 N. Gay St.The three-story building for many years was the home of Simon Harris Sporting Goods, a Baltimore retailer that closed its doors in 1992 after 105 years.It was provided for the new purpose by a Baltimore businessman, Joe Hevia of Mass Transit Communications -- Wallscapes.
NEWS
April 21, 1995
The dozen or so "street people" who hang around Westminster seem as much fixtures in the Carroll County seat as any immovable edifice. If they aren't sitting on the benches in front of the county library, you can find them at the planter near Paradiso or perhaps on the steps by Schmitt's Rexall Drugs.The presence of these men and a few women in downtown Westminster has been a nagging problem for merchants, shoppers and residents. They occasionally panhandle, harass passersby, drink alcohol in public, urinate on walls and trees.
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