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NEWS
By S. M. Khalid | May 3, 1991
Eastern District police swooped down yesterday afternoon on alleged street drug dealers and users as they executed their third "Operation Clean Sweep" in two years.In the operation, which is expected to last through the weekend, uniformed patrols and plainclothes officers are moving systematically through at least 40 predetermined areas where heavy drug trafficking has been reported.In the first six hours, officers arrested 15 people on several drug charges and confiscated more than $300 in cash and small quantities of cocaine.
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HEALTH
By Carrie Wells and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
Heroin overdose deaths soared last year in Baltimore, a city that has struggled with one of the highest rates of heroin addiction in the nation and with the violence that comes with illegal drug dealing. In 2012, 126 people died in the city from heroin overdoses, a jump of 66 percent from the previous year, when 76 died, reversing recent declines, according to a Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene report released Wednesday. The new data could confirm the recent warnings from state health officials that a crackdown on illicit prescription opiates was pushing more addicts toward the street drug.
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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Annapolis Bureau | March 31, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer issued a public warning yesterday about the street drug "China White," a potent synthetic narcotic that has killed at least 23 Marylanders since Jan. 25.Fentanyl citrate, which is 100 times stronger than heroin, took 17 lives in Baltimore, three in Baltimore County, and one each in Carroll, Montgomery and Prince George's counties, according to the latest report from the state medical examiner, Dr. John Smialek."
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2003
A Baltimore man was sentenced to life in prison plus 30 years yesterday for shooting five people, including three children, as he tried to settle a drug score last year. Mark Canty, 31, was convicted in May of five counts of attempted murder and several firearms charges. None of the children was seriously injured, but Judge Timothy J. Doory said it was irrelevant that they were merely grazed by bullets. "You get no credit for lack of aim," Doory said in city Circuit Court. The incident happened July 19 last year when Canty ran into a crowd of people in the 1500 block of Baker St. and fired his .357 handgun several times.
NEWS
August 1, 1991
Drugs and the violence they spawn have taken over the streets in many cities, including parts of Baltimore. Bizarre gun battles, murders and chaos in residential neighborhoods once considered stable, if poor, often make promises of a "war on drugs" seem empty, impossible to fulfill.Not so. A lawyer-led group, the American Alliance for Rights & Responsibilities, has looked anew at the lawlessness that has made so many people hopeless. It has produced the first-ever national inventory of the techniques citizen groups have used with success against street drug markets.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Sun Staff Writer | April 19, 1994
Residents of a west Columbia high-rise apartment building applauded as Howard County police officers confiscated more than $4,000 in cocaine and arrested four men on drug charges during a raid Friday night.Tenants said they were happy that their complaints of open drug distribution have finally been heard."We were very satisfied they got it out of here," said Carol Scott, a 15-year resident of Abbott House. "It makes the whole building look bad."At 11:30 p.m. Friday, officers from the Street Drug Section and the Tactical Section served two search and seizure warrants at the Abbott House, a nine-story building in the 5400 block of Cedar Lane in Harpers Choice.
NEWS
September 13, 1993
Call a well-educated professional woman who heads a small neighborhood group not far from Park Heights and Woodland avenues to ask about the drug trade."
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | July 1, 1991
Washington. -- "It's amazing,'' said the Orange Hat anti-drug patrol member in one of this capital city's crack-infested neighborhoods. ''You come around the corner and the dealers freeze in their tracks like jack-lighted deer. Cars start backing down the street so you can't read their license plate numbers. Within minutes of pulling out a video camera, there isn't a dealer within a block and a half radius, where before there were a dozen dealers blocking the sidewalk.''The example comes from ''The Winnable War -- A Community Guide to Eradicating Street Drug Markets,'' a booklet that may be the best manual ever for citizens trying to rid their neighborhoods of increasingly violent open-air drug markets.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1999
The symbol of Carroll County's war on drugs -- a toe tag on a body -- is everywhere.The toe tag reads "Heroin Kills" and appears on 10,000 bumper stickers, 30,000 refrigerator magnets and up to five billboards along county highways."
NEWS
February 5, 1993
If the Carroll County Drug Task Force has any value, it ought to demonstrate it by shutting the open-air drug market operating in the 100 block of South Center Street in Westminster.Action by the task force would come too late for Gregory Lamont Howard, the 22-year old who was gunned down there on the night of Jan. 29, but it won't be soon enough for the other residents of the neighborhood.Since last fall, people living in nearby townhouses have alerted police to rampant drug dealing near their homes.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,Sun Staff | February 27, 2000
Clayton Guyton leans his sturdy body against a rowhouse at Rose Street and Ashland Avenue, looking carefully down the block for signs of trouble. Shots ring out nearby: Crack! Crack! Crack! Then a reply: Pop! Pop! Pop! Pop! Guyton hardly flinches. He steps forward, onto the corner, joined by three armed companions. It is early December. Just days after the execution-style killing of five women in a rowhouse one mile away. Just hours since one of the suspects was caught by police less than 100 yards from Rose and Ashland and another was found nearby, his throat slashed ear to ear. Rumors of retaliation, that an all-out gang war could engulf the neighborhood, are flying.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2000
A group of teens sits at the bus stop talking, while a few linger on the street. A pack of kids runs around the corner and down the hill to the park. Others stand outside their two-story homes and watch. It's a typical afternoon in Newtowne Twenty, one of Annapolis' 10 public housing developments. But some residents want that to change. They say there is too much loitering and drug dealing in their neighborhood off Newtowne Road, and they have asked the city for help. The city council is scheduled to decide tomorrow whether to designate Newtowne Twenty as a "drug-loitering-free zone" -- the city's first application of an anti-loitering law approved last year.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2000
For the second time in 10 days, Baltimore's top police officer has been involved in the arrest of a drug suspect -- demonstrating that his stern anti-crime strategy is for real and that those in the drug trade aren't very discerning. Yesterday morning, Police Commissioner Ronald L. Daniel called for backup when, police say, Steven Lewis Jupiter of the 1000 block of McKean Ave. tried to sell him suspected marijuana. "I had emergency police lights mounted on the dash of my car, and any idiot could have looked and saw I was a police officer," said Daniel, who was taking a nostalgic tour of his boyhood West Baltimore neighborhood.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1999
The symbol of Carroll County's war on drugs -- a toe tag on a body -- is everywhere.The toe tag reads "Heroin Kills" and appears on 10,000 bumper stickers, 30,000 refrigerator magnets and up to five billboards along county highways."
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1999
Buoyed for the third year by funds from the state's anti-crime HotSpot program, Columbia's Village of Long Reach has seen tangible results: The once run-down village center is no longer defined by loiterers and poor lighting, and the police satellite station has a full-time staff of four.But just across Tamar Drive, within walking distance of Long Reach High School and the Interfaith Center, is a street residents say continues to be troubled with crime.Howard County police recently began working undercover on Yellowrose Court -- a "hot spot" within the HotSpot -- to stem drug activity and address residents' complaints about everything from breaking and entering to destruction of property.
NEWS
August 19, 1998
The following editorial appeared in the Chicago Tribune on Saturday:When Milwaukee Mayor John Norquist got wind of a university study that characterized the young people who deal drugs in his city as hard-working entrepreneurs chasing the American dream, he was furious. It's easy to understand why. The drug trade in Milwaukee is the source of violence and social distress, as it is in other big cities. Those who control it and benefit from it hardly deserve praise.But the insight into the nature of the drug trade offered by criminologist John Hagedorn at the University of Illinois at Chicago ought not be dismissed so easily.
NEWS
August 19, 1998
The following editorial appeared in the Chicago Tribune on Saturday:When Milwaukee Mayor John Norquist got wind of a university study that characterized the young people who deal drugs in his city as hard-working entrepreneurs chasing the American dream, he was furious. It's easy to understand why. The drug trade in Milwaukee is the source of violence and social distress, as it is in other big cities. Those who control it and benefit from it hardly deserve praise.But the insight into the nature of the drug trade offered by criminologist John Hagedorn at the University of Illinois at Chicago ought not be dismissed so easily.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1996
Baltimore city and police officials are predicting that the worst is over in this weekend's public health crisis triggered by a street drug that has killed three and sent more than 50 to area hospitals with strokelike symptoms.Saturday night, two more people were treated at area hospitals and released after apparently using the drug, billed as heroin, that police say appeared in Baltimore on Friday night.The drug -- a combination of an anti-motion-sickness drug, cough suppressant and mixing agent -- causes users to become extremely agitated, violent and paranoid.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1997
On the streets they called him Fruity because he was wild and had a temper that could erupt, consequences be damned. You didn't mess with Fruity.In church, he was Randy Roberts. He played drums at Gillis Memorial Christian Community Church on Park Heights Avenue, but gravitated toward any instrument he could get his hands on -- piano, guitar, cornet. Sure, Randy had a temper, but he wasn't wild. He was a City College graduate, class of 1987.He lived in two worlds. No big deal. Lots of folks did. They'd run the streets, hit the clubs, lose themselves in the R & B scene, do and say whatever they pleased -- except on Sunday.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1996
She's 18 years old, barely 5 feet tall and dressed in baggy jeans and black patent-leather Mary Janes.When Southern District police Officer Will Narango saw Shemeka Wise, he knew she didn't belong with the estimated 150 prostitutes who regularly cruise the 60-square-block area of Southwest Baltimore he patrols daily."
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