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NEWS
September 4, 1993
Lynne Battaglia, the United States attorney-designate for Maryland, is on the right track when she says she wants to make street crime in Baltimore her top priority. Muggings, break-ins, hold-ups and assaults are, as she says, not only making life hell for those who live here, but are driving good citizens to the suburbs. The city itself is a victim.Most U.S. attorneys prefer to assign higher priorities to other transgressions -- political corruption, civil rights, white-collar crime, especially of the financial sort.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Hampden residents are threatening to leave their famous 34th Street Christmas lights off in an effort to get the city's attention after a recent string of violent crimes in the neighborhood. A 67-year-old man was attacked and beaten unconscious Monday afternoon while picking up trash from the sidewalk at the corner of Falls Road and West 36th Street, police said. Three hours later, a man with a gun held up a Subway restaurant on Falls Road. Bob Hosier, who claims to have started the Northeast Baltimore holiday tradition more than 60 years ago, said he worries about the safety of the tourists who flock each year to see the hub cap Christmas tree and big red lighted crab.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
Over a period of about five hours, a man was shot and two people were beaten early Wednesday in what police say is part of a surge in street robberies across the city. A wave of these street robberies over the last few weeks fit similar patterns of young adults or juveniles targeting distracted people and stealing their cellphones, wallets and other valuables and fleeing in cars, police said. Some cases involve suspects flashing guns, making threats or assaulting or shooting victims, according to victims and police reports.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
Over a period of about five hours, a man was shot and two people were beaten early Wednesday in what police say is part of a surge in street robberies across the city. A wave of these street robberies over the last few weeks fit similar patterns of young adults or juveniles targeting distracted people and stealing their cellphones, wallets and other valuables and fleeing in cars, police said. Some cases involve suspects flashing guns, making threats or assaulting or shooting victims, according to victims and police reports.
NEWS
August 10, 1993
The old definition of a conservative as a liberal who has been mugged comes to mind on hearing Lynne Anne Battaglia's remarks upon being nominated to be United States attorney for Maryland. Ms. Battaglia said she would make crime in Baltimore her top priority. By crime she made it clear she meant street crime, crimes of violence and the sort of threatening activity "that deters people from living there."She was stabbed during a robbery attempt when she was living in Bolton Hill. Subsequently, after the birth of a son, the family moved to Columbia.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2000
St. John's College freshman Alethea Scally won't leave campus anymore. She is not terrified of Annapolis' charming downtown streets, but she is resigned to not walking them. After being robbed twice within a week last month, the 20-year-old New Mexico native says, "I just don't feel safe." More than a dozen people have been robbed or attacked since the beginning of August, some with sawed-off shotguns and 6-inch knives pointed at them just yards from the governor's mansion. While Annapolis police say crime isn't significantly up, August was a rough month that saw drive-by shootings, assaults, muggings and rapes across the city, and an unusual number of robberies in the heart of downtown.
NEWS
April 5, 1991
Frightened by AIDS, drugs, street crime and other realities of teenage life today, some parents apparently are allowing their teen-age children to have sex at home. If teen-agers are sexually active, the parents reason, they are better off at home than in a place that might not be safe. Also, parents say, the home allows them to know who their children's sexual partners are.The Evening Sun wants to know what you think about this issue.To register your opinion, call SUNDIAL at 783-1800 (or 268-7736 in Anne Arundel County)
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | August 19, 1991
Washington. -- In the presidential elections of 1968 and 1972, the centerpiece of Richard Nixon's appeal to ''the white backlash'' was his promise to ''take crime out of the streets.''''He did -- and put it in the White House,'' one wag observed, as many Nixon aides were going to prison.Ronald Reagan won millions of votes in 1980 with his vows to restore ''law and order,'' a cry that still was sellable in 1984 even though the Reagan administration itself was clearly riddled with money-grubbing lawbreakers.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | March 28, 2004
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - A Harvard University janitor charged in a recent series of sexual assaults in Cambridge has admitted to police that he groped more than 120 women, authorities said yesterday during a seminar on combating street crime. However, only five of Geremias Cruz Ramos' alleged victims reported the crime, and police want to know why. In a separate case earlier this year, police apprehended a male bicyclist who allegedly groped several women in the Harvard Square area. His build, clothing, and the antique bike he was riding matched exactly the women's description of the suspect.
NEWS
By Brian Sullam | July 16, 1991
In an effort to stem the tide of violent crime that has swept the city's streets, Baltimore has joined a national effort to use federal gun laws to help convict and imprison career criminals and drug traffickers.Under the program, which has been named Project Achilles, agents from the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms will work with Baltimore police officers to identify hard-core street criminals who can be prosecuted under the federal "career criminal" statute, which has stiff prison sentences for career felons who use guns.
NEWS
April 23, 2013
Laurel police report felonies, arrests and property crimes. Prince George's County police report violent crimes and property crimes. City of Laurel Baltimore Avenue, 14100 block, April 14. Shoplifting. Main Street, 600 block, April 14. Theft. Washington Boulevard, 900 block, April 13. Shoplifting. Fourth Street, 14700 block, April 12. Theft of motorcycle. Fourth Street, 14700 block, April 12. Theft of motorcycle. Oxford Drive, 14200 block, April 12. Motor vehicle theft.
NEWS
April 18, 2013
Laurel Police report felonies, arrests and property crimes. Prince George's County police report violent crimes and property crimes. City of Laurel Marshall Avenue, 300 block, April 7. Theft of motor vehicle parts, accessories. Baltimore Avenue, 13600 block, April 7. Forced-entry burglary. Contee Road, 6900 block, April 6. Motor vehicle theft. Main Street, 300 block, April 5. Forced-0entry burglary. Main Street, 300 block, April 5. Attempted burglary.
EXPLORE
October 31, 2011
The following is compiled from police reports from the Cockeysville Precinct. Our policy is to include descriptions only when there is enough information to make identification possible. Parkton Stablers Church Road , between 9 a.m. Oct. 22 and 8:11 p.m. Oct. 23. Mailboxes destroyed at 14 houses after being struck with hard object. Downes Road, 20300 block, between 6 p.m. Oct. 25 and 9 a.m. Oct. 26. Snow blower stolen from unlocked shed.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
Despite Tuesday's searing heat and humidity, Howard County police officers spent the day outside, bringing a trailer full of games and activities to the first of five neighborhoods where kids out of school want something fun to do. The county police helicopter and the department's armored car were on display as hot dogs and hamburgers cooked on a grill behind Stonehouse, the Long Reach community center, though few neighborhood kids showed up...
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Peter.hermann@baltsun.com | July 24, 2009
Nicole wanted to be a lawyer but instead, at the age of 23, is "on the stroll" on Calvert and on East 21st streets, at 1 a.m. this past Saturday, searching for the next trick. "She" is a "he," working the Old Goucher neighborhood in Lower Charles Village, an area notorious for liaisons with transgender prostitutes. Nicole's story is typical - parents addicted to heroin, grandparents to alcohol, dropped out of high school at 17, sexually confused, hit the streets as a teenager to be sold to older men, robbed, raped, battered and abandoned.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 10, 2008
We asked painter Tony Shore, whose gritty new images of gang violence and street crime are on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery, whether he'd been watching too much TV lately - specifically, The Wire, HBO's police drama about gang violence and street crime in Baltimore. Not at all, Shore replied. Over the past few months he's been far too busy making his signature acrylic-on-black-velvet paintings to watch TV. Still, since winning the Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts' $25,000 Sondheim Artscape Prize last summer, Shore has taken his painting in an unexpected direction.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | November 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- If any politicians are wondering why the voters view them with such pervasive skepticism, they have only to consider their performance on the crime issue here this year.Once it became apparent from the results of the 1993 elections and the opinion polls that crime had climbed to first place among the electorate's concerns, senators and congressmen entered into a dizzying competition to see who could respond most aggressively -- or, at least, be seen as doing so.No one bothered to wonder whether those poll figures might have been inflated right now by all the concentration on the crime issue in the high-visibility campaigns in New York and New Jersey that was reflected in the attention paid to the issue by television news programs.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND AND JULES WITCOVER | May 28, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Hollywood and Vine isn't what it used to be. The star figures are still there, embedded in the sidewalk pavement bearing all the memorable movie names, from Miriam Hopkins and Gloria Swanson to Kirk Douglas and Ray Milland. But the glamour is missing.In its place is a steady stream of panhandlers and other homeless derelicts often intimidating the few tourists braving the scene. The most famous corner in filmdom is Exhibit A of how much of the glitter of the heart of Hollywood has been rubbed out by the reality of street life in the Los Angeles of the 1990s.
NEWS
May 3, 2007
Welcome alternative to failed drug war Mayor Sheila Dixon's plan for fighting crime in the city is another positive initiative in her brief tenure as mayor ("Dixon outlines city crime-fighting plan," May 1). Targeting the most dangerous offenders, cracking down on illegal guns and strengthening community partnerships are all progressive steps. City Police Commissioner Leonard D. Hamm called the mayor's plan the right strategy because he believes the city streets are now manageable.
NEWS
May 2, 2004
BALTIMORE POLICE Commissioner Kevin P. Clark's playbook for fighting crime is a dense, fact-laden 77-page document peppered with alliteration. "Disrupt, Debrief, Deploy, Dismantle and Deliver" (the five imperatives of his core strategy). "Multi-Post Mentality" (an approach that concentrates officers in high-crime areas within a police district). "Communication, coordination and cooperation" (the least we can expect). It all sounds so bedevilingly bureaucratic. How Commissioner Clark's plan plays on the streets of Baltimore, that's the meat of the matter and the true measure of its worth.
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