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By ANTERO PIETILA | November 7, 1992
For a decade and a half, efforts to rescue the old Orchard Street Methodist Church were a seemingly never-ending saga of false starts and frustrations. But when the Baltimore Urban League decided to acquire the badly vandalized landmark for its new headquarters, it injected enough credibility and clout to get things moving.Now that the $3.7 million restoration has been completed, it is heartening to report that the result is nothing short of spectacular.''I think we are going to be an anchor for the whole Druid Hill Avenue corridor,'' says Urban League president Roger I. Lyons.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2006
"She was one of those old-time people who raised a family, took care of her husband, was a regular churchgoer and sang in the choir," the Rev. Irvin C. Lochman said yesterday of his church's longest-attending and oldest member. He was remembering Irene Gladys Taylor, who died a week ago as she neared her 108th birthday. She was the matriarch of a Baltimore family that includes 87 living descendants across four generations. One of Maryland's oldest residents, Mrs. Taylor had a simple but rich life, raising her eight children while never smoking, touching alcohol or driving a car, with a marriage that lasted nearly 60 years until her husband's death in 1978.
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NEWS
By Eric Addison | January 31, 1991
The Baltimore Urban League earlier this month announced its choice of an architect for the restoration of the Orchard Street Church at 521 Orchard St., near Martin Luther King Boulevard and Druid Hill Avenue, thus taking another step in its plan to move from Mondawmin Mall into new offices in the church next year.When the move to the new quarters eventually takes place, one of the city's oldest service and advocacy organizations for black people will be housed in a stop on the famous underground railroad of Civil War days, and the oldest black church in Maryland.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | October 8, 2006
Candidates for high public office like to say that color should not be an issue in their races. They know it is, of course. It was there last week when three men running for the U.S. Senate met for a debate in Baltimore. They tried to avoid the proverbial elephant in the room, to no avail. The debate setting, the sponsor and the field of candidates - not to speak of the strategies employed by the parties - make race as politically prominent as any policy issue. The candidates stood at lecterns positioned near the pulpit of the old Orchard Street Church - in lore, at least, a depot for the Underground Railroad.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
The newly restored Orchard Street Church, already headquarters for the Baltimore Urban League, will be the home of a new museum devoted to the city's early African-American churches and their congregations.Members of the social services organization, which moved last fall to the restored church property at 512 Orchard St., recently approved a mission statement for the museum, planned as a second phase of construction.It will tell "the story of black churches in Baltimore, with a special emphasis on Orchard Street Church," said Nancy Brennan, executive director of the Baltimore City Life Museums, a consultant to the league.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | November 5, 1995
A Gospel Extravaganza has generated good news for Union Street Methodist Church. The $1,700 proceeds from the Oct. 28 concert will buy a new piano for the Westminster church."
NEWS
May 16, 2005
On May 12, 2005; COLUMBUS BROWN; beloved husband of Aldreece Brown. On Tuesday, friends may call at the VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES, 5151 Balto. Natl' Pike, from 3 to 8 P.M. On Wednesday, Mr. Brown will lie instate at the Monroe Street Church of God, 301 N. Monroe Street, where the family will receive friends from 10 to 11 A.M. with services to follow. Inquiries to 410-233-2400.
NEWS
September 12, 2004
On September 7, 2004; HANIBLEMASHACK, beloved husband of Louise D. Mashack. On Sunday, friends may call at THE NEW VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES (Randallstown), 8728 Liberty Road from 3 to 8 P.M. On Monday, the family will receive friends from 11 to 11:30 A.M. at the Monroe Street Church of God, 301 N. Monroe Street, with services to follow. Inquiries to 410-655-0015.
NEWS
November 9, 1992
The splendid $3.7 million restoration of Baltimore's Orchard Street Church -- which was celebrated over the weekend -- is a miracle, which makes one appreciate a remark once made by Israel's Golda Meir: "The impossible only takes longer."Until the Baltimore Urban League decided to restore the landmark church, it was a badly vandalized shell for a decade and a half. Others had endlessly talked about restoration and raised untold thousands of dollars without any results. The Urban League finally got the wheels moving and now occupies part of the complex as its headquarters.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | September 24, 1992
With a month to go before moving its headquarters to th historic Orchard Street Church, the Baltimore Urban League yesterday came much closer to raising the $3.7 million needed to pay for the restoration.Alex. Brown & Sons Inc. presented a $600,000 check, representing an agreement to invest in the project. In return, the Baltimore investment banking firm hopes to benefit by syndicating federal tax credits available for restoration of historic buildings.The investment brings to $3.1 million the amount raised from public and private sources.
NEWS
By RALPH CLAYTON | April 21, 2006
Although urban legends abound in cities throughout the South, perhaps none have been more enduring than the tales of the existence of a slave escape tunnel beneath the Orchard Street Church in Baltimore's Seton Hill neighborhood. Despite the lack of authentic historical documentation to substantiate the claims, the location continues to be regarded by many as a 19th-century stop on the Underground Railroad. Much of the surviving oral history is filled with the buzz words that historians dread, such as "it is alleged," "oral tradition contends" and "what is believed to be."
NEWS
May 16, 2005
On May 12, 2005; COLUMBUS BROWN; beloved husband of Aldreece Brown. On Tuesday, friends may call at the VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES, 5151 Balto. Natl' Pike, from 3 to 8 P.M. On Wednesday, Mr. Brown will lie instate at the Monroe Street Church of God, 301 N. Monroe Street, where the family will receive friends from 10 to 11 A.M. with services to follow. Inquiries to 410-233-2400.
NEWS
September 12, 2004
On September 7, 2004; HANIBLEMASHACK, beloved husband of Louise D. Mashack. On Sunday, friends may call at THE NEW VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES (Randallstown), 8728 Liberty Road from 3 to 8 P.M. On Monday, the family will receive friends from 11 to 11:30 A.M. at the Monroe Street Church of God, 301 N. Monroe Street, with services to follow. Inquiries to 410-655-0015.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2003
With commemorations of Sept. 11 expected to be low-key this year, a chain of people standing silently along Charles Street tomorrow afternoon may be one of the most visible demonstrations in the area for victims of the terrorist attacks. For the second year in a row, a local group of women is organizing what it calls a Peace Path, asking the public to line the sidewalks of Charles Street from the Inner Harbor to the Beltway between 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. Last year, about 1,000 people, from toddlers to senior citizens and Catholic nuns to college students, stood along the 12-mile stretch of the city's main artery.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | May 18, 2002
IRECENTLY walked past the long closed Danny's Restaurant at Charles and Biddle streets and thought about how its patrons would fill the place, maybe after a day at Pimlico, possibly the Preakness. And of how so many of Baltimore's restaurants and nightspots had their house musicians, those wonderful pianists, sidemen and singers whose versions of a song will always stay with you. And while I never knew him, I think of men like Howard "Church" Anderson Sr., who died May 6 at age 90 in his West Baltimore home.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2002
For the third time in its nearly 150-year history, St. John Catholic Church in Westminster will break ground for a new house of worship - a $6.5 million building that will become the largest parish church in the Archdiocese of Baltimore. Cardinal William Keeler will officiate at a March 3 ceremony, blessing a vacant plot along Route 140 near Sullivan Avenue, where a 20,000- square-foot church will rise over the next 15 months. The new church will accommodate a growing congregation that could reach 15,000 people by 2005.
NEWS
July 16, 1994
The Rev. R. Brooke Gibson, parish associate of the First and Franklin Street Presbyterian Church and executive director of Harford Hospice, died June 21 of a heart attack while vacationing in St. Andrews, New Brunswick, Canada. He was 59 and lived in Reservoir Hill.In 1981, he came to Baltimore from Cleveland as an associate presbytery executive of the Presbytery of Baltimore.In 1983, he became a part-time member of the staff of First and Franklin Street church where he preached, assisted in worship services and conducted congregational visits.
NEWS
October 26, 1990
Milton J. Carr, who had been a teacher and more recently an architect and builder, died Sunday at Bon Secours Hospital after a short illness. He was 88 and lived on McKean Avenue.Services for Mr. Carr will be held at 11:30 a.m. tomorrow at the Sharp Street United Methodist Church, Dolphin and Etting streets.He operated his own business, designing and building mostly houses from the mid-1940s until about 10 years ago, when he began serving only as a consultant.For about 20 years before going into business, he taught industrial arts at Booker T. Washington Junior High School.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2002
For the third time in its nearly 150-year history, St. John Catholic Church in Westminster will break ground on a new house of worship - a $6.5 million building that will become the largest parish church in the Archdiocese of Baltimore. Cardinal William Keeler will officiate at a March 3 ceremony blessing a vacant plot of land along Route 140 near Sullivan Avenue, where a 20,000-square-foot church will stand in about 15 months. The new church will accommodate a growing congregation that could reach 15,000 people by 2005.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2001
After years of financial difficulty, the Baltimore Urban League has a plan to get back on track. The league has revamped its leadership, reduced its $1.6 million debt by about half and has improved recordkeeping. Officials are raising money, paying back loans and catching up on delinquent audits. Although the nonprofit organization remains about $800,000 in debt, leaders are optimistic that it soon will regain its reputation as an effective benefactor of the poor. "We lost our wheels, and now need to put them back on," said Marlene C. McLaurin, a United Way official who has been interim chief operating officer since September.
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