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By Laura Vozzella | July 11, 2011
The street artist known as Gaia, whose image of a leather-clad rooster cradling the head of John the Baptist had me questioning my eyesight and sanity last winter, has been unmasked -- in a way that proves no good deed goes unpunished. Gaia is trying to help the Edgar Allan Poe House, which is in danger of closing because the city has cut off funding. He has donated 100 limited-edition prints of "The Raven (Forevermore), 2011," which will be sold for $400 apiece unframed, $600 framed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
"I don't know, sister, what I'm saying, nor do no man, if he don't be praying. I know that love is the only answer and the tight-rope lover the only dancer. … - From the poem " Some Days (for Paula)" by James Baldwin The tightrope lover was 40 years old in 1983 when Baldwin published a book containing this prescient verse. The author hoped that "Some Days" would help his younger sister steady her nerves and find her footing as she inched along the thin path to safety.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2011
If you want to experience the work of street artist Gaia in its full, scruffy glory, see it in the wild. Drive south down North Collington Avenue, past Biddle and Eager and Chase. You will despair of spotting anything fresh in one blighted block after another. But slow down as you near Ashland. On the corner of a string of boarded-up rowhouses is an image you register with pleasure and relief: a portrait of a carrier pigeon as a natural creature with an almost unnatural poise. It's a jolting and precise piece of poster art. Mysterious and witty, it carries a kinetic charge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
The girl in the tire swing is swaying above North Avenue, sneakers pointing to a traffic light. A block away, the Natty Boh guy and the Utz girl speed away on their wedding day, cans trailing behind their car. And then there's Cupid, aiming an arrow at the street. Above him float the words, "I loved more. " The works of artist Reed Bmore look like line drawings come to life. The 22-year-old shapes sculptures from metal wire, then hangs them on light poles and traffic light cables.
FEATURES
January 11, 2006
Art Work of street artist displayed The artwork of Daniel Jerome Rykaczewski is on display at the Creative Alliance, 3134 East ern Ave., starting today. The works by the self-proclaimed "street artist" are abstract and intricate and will be on view through Jan. 21. A reception is scheduled for tomorrow from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Informa tion: 410-276-1651 or go to creativealliance.org.
FEATURES
December 6, 2013
Maybe we CAN all just get along. In its Going-Out Guide, The Washington Post discovers "A side of Baltimore you've never seen," by which, they mean cool places to eat, drink, see art and catch some live music. This comes after our D.C. friends have dissed our rats , waxed condescending about our attractions and trashed sainted chef Spike Gjerde's new restaurant . (Oh, wait. We did, too. ) But Post writer Lavanya Ramanathan sounds earnest in her interest in Baltimore, and she took the time to speak (and listen)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
"I don't know, sister, what I'm saying, nor do no man, if he don't be praying. I know that love is the only answer and the tight-rope lover the only dancer. … - From the poem " Some Days (for Paula)" by James Baldwin The tightrope lover was 40 years old in 1983 when Baldwin published a book containing this prescient verse. The author hoped that "Some Days" would help his younger sister steady her nerves and find her footing as she inched along the thin path to safety.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
A Baltimore woman who has gained national attention for a project intended to publicly shame those who own vacant houses in the city now faces two lawsuits from one of those owners. Brian Spern, an attorney representing the two business trusts that own 539 N. Longwood St. in West Baltimore and 4727 Old York Road in North Baltimore, filed the property damage tort claims earlier this month. The sole defendant is Carol S. Ott, who has run the Baltimore Slumlord Watch blog since 2009 and partnered earlier this year with a group of street artists who paint murals on the vacant homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
The girl in the tire swing is swaying above North Avenue, sneakers pointing to a traffic light. A block away, the Natty Boh guy and the Utz girl speed away on their wedding day, cans trailing behind their car. And then there's Cupid, aiming an arrow at the street. Above him float the words, "I loved more. " The works of artist Reed Bmore look like line drawings come to life. The 22-year-old shapes sculptures from metal wire, then hangs them on light poles and traffic light cables.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 13, 1993
Anthony Corradetti lives in a glass house.Number 1109 Hollins Street is the place where the potash, silica sand, soda ash, lime and barium emerge from a furnace and a kiln as works of glass art.One day last week, the Southwest Baltimore glass blower got an invitation from the White House. One of his vases had been selected for its permanent collection as part of a celebration of American crafts."I got to shake the President and Mrs. Clinton's hand and have my picture taken. I was nervous thinking about it. Then I saw my peers there and I calmed down.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
A Baltimore woman who has gained national attention for a project intended to publicly shame those who own vacant houses in the city now faces two lawsuits from one of those owners. Brian Spern, an attorney representing the two business trusts that own 539 N. Longwood St. in West Baltimore and 4727 Old York Road in North Baltimore, filed the property damage tort claims earlier this month. The sole defendant is Carol S. Ott, who has run the Baltimore Slumlord Watch blog since 2009 and partnered earlier this year with a group of street artists who paint murals on the vacant homes.
FEATURES
December 6, 2013
Maybe we CAN all just get along. In its Going-Out Guide, The Washington Post discovers "A side of Baltimore you've never seen," by which, they mean cool places to eat, drink, see art and catch some live music. This comes after our D.C. friends have dissed our rats , waxed condescending about our attractions and trashed sainted chef Spike Gjerde's new restaurant . (Oh, wait. We did, too. ) But Post writer Lavanya Ramanathan sounds earnest in her interest in Baltimore, and she took the time to speak (and listen)
NEWS
September 19, 2011
The arrest of artist Mark Chase for painting at Baltimore'sInner Harbor without a city permit for engaging in commercial activity there raises an interesting First Amendment and civil liberties issue: When is making a painting in a public place a constitutionally protected act of expression, and when is it just a shtick to make a few bucks? In Mr. Chase's case, the answer seems to be a little of both. Mr. Chase was arrested Sunday by Baltimore police after he set up his painting gear outside Harbor Place and refused to leave when told he was violating trespass laws.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | July 11, 2011
The street artist known as Gaia, whose image of a leather-clad rooster cradling the head of John the Baptist had me questioning my eyesight and sanity last winter, has been unmasked -- in a way that proves no good deed goes unpunished. Gaia is trying to help the Edgar Allan Poe House, which is in danger of closing because the city has cut off funding. He has donated 100 limited-edition prints of "The Raven (Forevermore), 2011," which will be sold for $400 apiece unframed, $600 framed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2011
If you want to experience the work of street artist Gaia in its full, scruffy glory, see it in the wild. Drive south down North Collington Avenue, past Biddle and Eager and Chase. You will despair of spotting anything fresh in one blighted block after another. But slow down as you near Ashland. On the corner of a string of boarded-up rowhouses is an image you register with pleasure and relief: a portrait of a carrier pigeon as a natural creature with an almost unnatural poise. It's a jolting and precise piece of poster art. Mysterious and witty, it carries a kinetic charge.
FEATURES
January 11, 2006
Art Work of street artist displayed The artwork of Daniel Jerome Rykaczewski is on display at the Creative Alliance, 3134 East ern Ave., starting today. The works by the self-proclaimed "street artist" are abstract and intricate and will be on view through Jan. 21. A reception is scheduled for tomorrow from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Informa tion: 410-276-1651 or go to creativealliance.org.
NEWS
September 19, 2011
The arrest of artist Mark Chase for painting at Baltimore'sInner Harbor without a city permit for engaging in commercial activity there raises an interesting First Amendment and civil liberties issue: When is making a painting in a public place a constitutionally protected act of expression, and when is it just a shtick to make a few bucks? In Mr. Chase's case, the answer seems to be a little of both. Mr. Chase was arrested Sunday by Baltimore police after he set up his painting gear outside Harbor Place and refused to leave when told he was violating trespass laws.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 13, 1993
Anthony Corradetti lives in a glass house.Number 1109 Hollins Street is the place where the potash, silica sand, soda ash, lime and barium emerge from a furnace and a kiln as works of glass art.One day last week, the Southwest Baltimore glass blower got an invitation from the White House. One of his vases had been selected for its permanent collection as part of a celebration of American crafts."I got to shake the President and Mrs. Clinton's hand and have my picture taken. I was nervous thinking about it. Then I saw my peers there and I calmed down.
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