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By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Musicians collaborate all the time; so do actors. But artists, not really - and that goes double for street art, where making an individual mark is the name of the game. That's why one of Baltimore's best-known street artists had to try it. The result is a head-turning show called ZimZum, opening Saturday at the Creative Alliance . It features an expansive indoor and outdoor group effort between Baltimore Love Project founder Michael Owen and the artists Gaia and Momo. "Most street artists just want to put their voice up on a wall," Owen says.
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NEWS
August 6, 2013
The passing of Baltimore Colt great Art Donovan ( "Beloved player known for his grit and his wit," Aug. 5) brought back a special childhood memory. Growing up on Pinewood Avenue in northeast Baltimore, I had the good fortune to live across the street from "Artie. " On more than one occasion, I would have one of my parents cross me over to his house. I then knocked on his front door and asked this bona fide NFL star on a world championship team to play football with me in his backyard.
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NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | February 20, 2012
There are a couple of small, predictable joys that occur daily during my workweek - and probably yours. It's likely you haven't noticed them properly before, nor the subtle influence they have on your mood. Fortunately, I have penned this opinion piece to help you understand why, against all odds, you are happy in Baltimore. The first experience happens on my morning commute around 7:30; it's that initial glimpse of the Howard Street Bridge after emerging from the tunnel. There is something ridiculously uplifting about the sight of the massive, festive, green-and-yellow painted structure.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Charlie "Fruit Man" McLean has been "a-rabbing" in Baltimore for more than 40 years, and he still can't think of a better way to spend his time. As a boy, he rode with the men who sold fresh produce in the streets from their brightly colored horse-drawn wagons. He made the job his life's work. Even now, he says, he can get fresh food to people who might otherwise never see it. McLean, 53, is one of only about 10 people still "a-rabbing," as Baltimoreans have long called his line of work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2012
Next weekend, visitors to the Baltimore Art Museum's newly renovated Contemporary Wing may find themselves staring up at a hole in the ceiling, their mouths gaping open like fish. They'll have been hooked by a central feature of the $6.5 million building project - artist Sarah Oppenheimer's playful, gravity-defying illusion with the enigmatic name "W-120301. " And who would blame them for staring? How often can we watch someone appear to walk up a wall? Oppenheimer knocked holes in walls and cut through ceiling to change the architecture of the Baltimore Museum of Art . And, that's not a bad metaphor for museum director Doreen Bolger's goal to knock down the walls between the museum and the community.
FEATURES
By LINDA LOWE MORRIS | March 1, 1992
Looking around Charles Street Art and Antiques, a new gallery on Charles just north of Mount Vernon Place, you see room after room that reminds you of an amazing museum or a wonderful salon in Paris. Yet what you're really seeing is the triumph of love, the love that a small child growing up in Brooklyn had for art."I came from a very tough Irish-Italian neighborhood," says the gallery's owner, Patricia Bonacorda. "Most children who grew up there never went out of that neighborhood. Except me. I learned to ride the subway when I was 9 years old."
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | May 28, 2007
The heavy aroma of incense, funnel cake and fresh paint permeated the streets of Southwest Baltimore yesterday for the 22nd annual Sowebohemian Arts and Music Festival. But it was mostly art that was the order of the day with an eclectic array of creators - such as a whimsical Baltimore hon with a beehive hairdo who was selling painted light switch plates. A local artist showed a collage made of old tennis shoes, and jewelers who twisted wires displayed their latest designs on the pavement.
NEWS
By Martha Groves and Martha Groves,Los Angeles Times | February 8, 2009
The red, white and blue "Hope" posters bearing the image of Barack Obama brought worldwide fame to the Los Angeles street artist who created them and arguably helped their subject win the White House. But Shepard Fairey, a guerrilla artist willing to go to jail for his distinctive graffiti, hasn't gone entirely mainstream. Fairey was arrested Friday night in Boston on his way to the Institute of Contemporary Art for a kickoff event for his first solo exhibition, Supply and Demand. Two warrants had been issued for Fairey on Jan. 24 after police determined he had tagged property in two locations with his street art campaign featuring Andre the Giant and the word "Obey," said Boston police officer James Kenneally.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2011
As Maryland lawmakers debated the gay marriage bill, and Del. Luke Clippinger came out to colleagues on the House floor, one of his fellow Baltimore Democrats was moved to tears. "My colleague Luke, I sit right next to him, enduring all these weeks of negativity, for him to finally speak out and say why he's in favor of it, what it means to him, it just got emotional," Del. Keiffer Mitchell told me. There's another reason the gay marriage debate hit home for Mitchell. His own marriage would have been illegal until 1967, the year he was born, because Mitchell is black and his wife is white.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | January 28, 2007
Mary Jo Gordon is a connoisseur of the art of life. She finds pleasure in the everyday ("I love the pure visual experience of Loehmann's"), as well as the unusual - art created from things people have thrown away. Gordon, a strong supporter of Baltimore's homegrown artists, recently moved her gallery into a new loft space on Parkdale Avenue in Woodberry. "It's more like your home where you entertain people rather than a business space." Sounds like a place where life and art can comfortably meld.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
Baltimore has been enveloped for weeks in a deep purple hue - figuratively at the very least, often literally - and this all-Ravens-all-the-time stimulation was bound to rub off on the arts community. Local artists have been expressing their enthusiasm for the Ravens throughout the football season with freshly created works, including pop-up images on downtown streets and murals in private homes. "It's pretty natural for artists to get excited about something going on in popular culture," said Jenny Carson, chair of the art history department at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Artists who tackle sports subjects do not necessarily get their rah-rahs out by doing portraits of popular athletes or incorporating team logos.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2012
Next weekend, visitors to the Baltimore Art Museum's newly renovated Contemporary Wing may find themselves staring up at a hole in the ceiling, their mouths gaping open like fish. They'll have been hooked by a central feature of the $6.5 million building project - artist Sarah Oppenheimer's playful, gravity-defying illusion with the enigmatic name "W-120301. " And who would blame them for staring? How often can we watch someone appear to walk up a wall? Oppenheimer knocked holes in walls and cut through ceiling to change the architecture of the Baltimore Museum of Art . And, that's not a bad metaphor for museum director Doreen Bolger's goal to knock down the walls between the museum and the community.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Musicians collaborate all the time; so do actors. But artists, not really - and that goes double for street art, where making an individual mark is the name of the game. That's why one of Baltimore's best-known street artists had to try it. The result is a head-turning show called ZimZum, opening Saturday at the Creative Alliance . It features an expansive indoor and outdoor group effort between Baltimore Love Project founder Michael Owen and the artists Gaia and Momo. "Most street artists just want to put their voice up on a wall," Owen says.
EXPLORE
By Gwendolyn Glenn | June 6, 2012
There have been numerous open house events at the C Street Gallery, Venus Theatre Play Shack and other venues along C Street since the area was designated Laurel's official Arts District last year. In addition, members of the Laurel Arts District Committee have developed a blog and Facebook page to promote events on C Street, parts of Main Street and the few other blocks and alleys included in the arts district. Now, on June 9, committee members are taking an even bigger step to increase traffic in the Arts District by holding the first C Street Arts Festival, which they hope to make an annual event.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2012
Oversized illustrations of Florida teenager Trayvon Martin have begun to spring up on abandoned buildings throughout Baltimore, the work of a street artist protesting the death of the 17-year-old at the hands of a neighborhood watch volunteer. An image of the young man's hooded face went up overnight on Wednesday at the intersection of Caroline and Baltimore streets. Only the youth's chin is visible, but a bag of Skittles — the type of candy Trayvon was carrying when he was shot — is superimposed in the lower right corner of the poster.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | February 20, 2012
There are a couple of small, predictable joys that occur daily during my workweek - and probably yours. It's likely you haven't noticed them properly before, nor the subtle influence they have on your mood. Fortunately, I have penned this opinion piece to help you understand why, against all odds, you are happy in Baltimore. The first experience happens on my morning commute around 7:30; it's that initial glimpse of the Howard Street Bridge after emerging from the tunnel. There is something ridiculously uplifting about the sight of the massive, festive, green-and-yellow painted structure.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Charlie "Fruit Man" McLean has been "a-rabbing" in Baltimore for more than 40 years, and he still can't think of a better way to spend his time. As a boy, he rode with the men who sold fresh produce in the streets from their brightly colored horse-drawn wagons. He made the job his life's work. Even now, he says, he can get fresh food to people who might otherwise never see it. McLean, 53, is one of only about 10 people still "a-rabbing," as Baltimoreans have long called his line of work.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2012
Oversized illustrations of Florida teenager Trayvon Martin have begun to spring up on abandoned buildings throughout Baltimore, the work of a street artist protesting the death of the 17-year-old at the hands of a neighborhood watch volunteer. An image of the young man's hooded face went up overnight on Wednesday at the intersection of Caroline and Baltimore streets. Only the youth's chin is visible, but a bag of Skittles — the type of candy Trayvon was carrying when he was shot — is superimposed in the lower right corner of the poster.
EXPLORE
By Michael McLaughlin | December 24, 2011
The Old Masters have come to Laurel. Some of the most memorable works of Boticelli, da Vinci, Van Gogh, Picasso, Dali, Wyeth — among others — have been installed at a new museum on Main Street. Ok, so they're not original works. But the high-quality reproductions, framed and hung in a floor-to-ceiling museum presentation, make an impressive display at a newly remodeled section of the Laurel Art Center. Earlier this month the Main Street art store unveiled its new "museum" at an invitation-only open house attended by some of its most loyal customers.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
Ronald Reagan was president. People were fighting to save whales. The first CD player came out. "Come on, Eileen" was all over the radio while "Rocky III" beat up the box office. Time Magazine named "the computer" man of the year. It was 1982, and here in Baltimore that summer, a festival called Artscape debuted. This year the event, now a city tradition, is paying an irreverent tribute to its roots by sending a bit of the festival back in time. Throughout the three-day festival, the stretch along Charles Street near Pennsylvania Station will be known as "1982 on the Charles Street Bridge.
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