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Stream Restoration

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By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
The Howard County Department of Public Works will tap a grant from the Chesapeake Bay Trust Fund to repair and restore a stream in Ellicott City that officials say has been badly degraded by erosion. Richard Powell, a project manager with the department's stormwater division, said the project involves a roughly 300-foot stretch of the stream running along and under Tuscany Road near Lombardi Drive before emptying into the Little Patuxent River. The project is scheduled to begin around Aug. 12. Powell said construction will not affect traffic, but a portion of the sidewalk will be closed.
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Aegis staff report | September 16, 2013
The Harford County Department of Public Works will partner with several agencies to host a rain garden workshop. The event will be held at the Abingdon Library on Saturday, Sept. 21, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The Department of Public Works teamed with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Anita C. Leight Estuary Center, the University of Maryland Master Gardener's and the Harford County Public Library to stage the event. The focus of the workshop will be on how homeowners can create rain gardens in their backyards while understanding the function of storm water and the mechanics of rain gardens.
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NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | December 31, 2005
In a muddy field in Middle River lies a concrete canal strewn with trash. Clipboard in hand, Candace Croswell stood beside it recently and described how the structure will be transformed into a stream. The concrete will soon be replaced by rocks and dirt, and the trash replaced by an array of plants. The goal is to slow the flow of water - and reduce the effect of nutrients and pollution in the river downstream and, ultimately, the Chesapeake Bay. "We're basically reshaping the channel - grading the sides and then putting in large rocks to keep the stream in place," said Croswell, a stream restoration manager with the Baltimore County environmental department.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
The Howard County Department of Public Works will tap a grant from the Chesapeake Bay Trust Fund to repair and restore a stream in Ellicott City that officials say has been badly degraded by erosion. Richard Powell, a project manager with the department's stormwater division, said the project involves a roughly 300-foot stretch of the stream running along and under Tuscany Road near Lombardi Drive before emptying into the Little Patuxent River. The project is scheduled to begin around Aug. 12. Powell said construction will not affect traffic, but a portion of the sidewalk will be closed.
NEWS
By Winyan Soo Hoo and Winyan Soo Hoo,Special to Baltimoresun.com | June 13, 2005
Baltimore County Executive Jim Smith and other officials plan to celebrate the completion of a stream restoration project for Minebank Run -- a Gunpowder Falls tributary that leads to the Chesapeake Bay -- on Tuesday morning at Cromwell Valley Park. The Baltimore County Department of Environmental Protection and Resource Management completed the $3.1 million project hoping to restore the banks of the local tributary, which has a history of major erosion and flooding problems, according to officials.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
Thirty-four projects in Maryland and the five other Chesapeake Bay watershed states have been awarded $3.4 million in grants to help reduce pollution in local creeks, streams and rivers, officials announced Thursday. The projects, proposed by community and environmental groups and state and local government, include stream restoration and installation of rain gardens, storm drain retrofits and green buildings. Funds come from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other federal agencies, along with some assistance from private businesses and nonprofits.
EXPLORE
September 21, 2011
The Harford County Department of Public Works, in partnership with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the University of Maryland – Master Gardeners and the Harford County Library, will be holding a rain garden workshop at Abingdon Library Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Registration is required. For more information, visit http://www.hcplonline.info or call 410-638-3990. The focus of the workshop will be how homeowners can create rain gardens in their own backyards.
EXPLORE
Aegis staff report | September 16, 2013
The Harford County Department of Public Works will partner with several agencies to host a rain garden workshop. The event will be held at the Abingdon Library on Saturday, Sept. 21, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The Department of Public Works teamed with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Anita C. Leight Estuary Center, the University of Maryland Master Gardener's and the Harford County Public Library to stage the event. The focus of the workshop will be on how homeowners can create rain gardens in their backyards while understanding the function of storm water and the mechanics of rain gardens.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | April 14, 1991
The students waded through slimy, green algae in water as high as their hips. They slid through a low tunnel, banging their heads in the dark. They climbed over tree trunks and sloshed down concrete culverts.Five hours later, they had tracked a stream from behind Aberdeen Middle School to where it connects with Swann Creek, a few miles beyond U.S. Route 40.Lannell Ward, one of 23 Aberdeen High students on an environmental field trip last week, had one conclusion: "Uggh! Everything's so dirty!"
NEWS
By Jeannie McDonald and Jeannie McDonald,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2001
Biddison Run, a stream that courses through the Eastern Sanitation Yard on Bowleys Lane in Northeast Baltimore, is getting an approximately $900,000 face lift next year, say city and community officials involved in the restoration project. Three to six months of repair work are expected to begin in late spring or early summer on a 500-yard section of Biddison Run, which flows from Herring Run to Back River. City workers and volunteers will complete the project - planting trees and bushes; removing logs, rocks and trash; and creating ponds and stocking them with fish.
EXPLORE
September 21, 2011
The Harford County Department of Public Works, in partnership with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the University of Maryland – Master Gardeners and the Harford County Library, will be holding a rain garden workshop at Abingdon Library Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Registration is required. For more information, visit http://www.hcplonline.info or call 410-638-3990. The focus of the workshop will be how homeowners can create rain gardens in their own backyards.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
Thirty-four projects in Maryland and the five other Chesapeake Bay watershed states have been awarded $3.4 million in grants to help reduce pollution in local creeks, streams and rivers, officials announced Thursday. The projects, proposed by community and environmental groups and state and local government, include stream restoration and installation of rain gardens, storm drain retrofits and green buildings. Funds come from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other federal agencies, along with some assistance from private businesses and nonprofits.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun Reporter | September 17, 2007
Every day for the past year, biologist Eric Schott turned over mossy rocks in Stony Run, looking for hope. Finally, this summer, he and other members of the Jones Falls Watershed Association, a volunteer conservation group that protects the 3.3-mile creek in Baltimore, found it. Here, hope croaks. Frogs - tadpoles to palm-size juveniles and full-grown bullfrogs - have been seen and heard for the first time in more than five years in this threatened streambed, said Schott, a biologist with the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute who has tracked Stony Run's condition.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | December 31, 2005
In a muddy field in Middle River lies a concrete canal strewn with trash. Clipboard in hand, Candace Croswell stood beside it recently and described how the structure will be transformed into a stream. The concrete will soon be replaced by rocks and dirt, and the trash replaced by an array of plants. The goal is to slow the flow of water - and reduce the effect of nutrients and pollution in the river downstream and, ultimately, the Chesapeake Bay. "We're basically reshaping the channel - grading the sides and then putting in large rocks to keep the stream in place," said Croswell, a stream restoration manager with the Baltimore County environmental department.
NEWS
By Winyan Soo Hoo and Winyan Soo Hoo,Special to Baltimoresun.com | June 13, 2005
Baltimore County Executive Jim Smith and other officials plan to celebrate the completion of a stream restoration project for Minebank Run -- a Gunpowder Falls tributary that leads to the Chesapeake Bay -- on Tuesday morning at Cromwell Valley Park. The Baltimore County Department of Environmental Protection and Resource Management completed the $3.1 million project hoping to restore the banks of the local tributary, which has a history of major erosion and flooding problems, according to officials.
NEWS
By Jeannie McDonald and Jeannie McDonald,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2001
Biddison Run, a stream that courses through the Eastern Sanitation Yard on Bowleys Lane in Northeast Baltimore, is getting an approximately $900,000 face lift next year, say city and community officials involved in the restoration project. Three to six months of repair work are expected to begin in late spring or early summer on a 500-yard section of Biddison Run, which flows from Herring Run to Back River. City workers and volunteers will complete the project - planting trees and bushes; removing logs, rocks and trash; and creating ponds and stocking them with fish.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun Reporter | September 17, 2007
Every day for the past year, biologist Eric Schott turned over mossy rocks in Stony Run, looking for hope. Finally, this summer, he and other members of the Jones Falls Watershed Association, a volunteer conservation group that protects the 3.3-mile creek in Baltimore, found it. Here, hope croaks. Frogs - tadpoles to palm-size juveniles and full-grown bullfrogs - have been seen and heard for the first time in more than five years in this threatened streambed, said Schott, a biologist with the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute who has tracked Stony Run's condition.
NEWS
By Jamie Manfuso and Jamie Manfuso,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2001
The Friends of Carroll County Streams expects to receive a donation of 1,000 trees and shrubs for its first restoration project, tree planting along a tributary of the south branch of the Patapsco River on April 7. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation has pledged 800 trees and shrubs - worth $6,000 - for the stream-bank reforestation project on a 300-acre state-owned tract off Hoods Mill Road near Sykesville. The Department of Natural Resources will contribute 200 trees, the group said. The group will meet at 7 p.m. today at Bear Branch Nature Center.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | April 14, 1991
The students waded through slimy, green algae in water as high as their hips. They slid through a low tunnel, banging their heads in the dark. They climbed over tree trunks and sloshed down concrete culverts.Five hours later, they had tracked a stream from behind Aberdeen Middle School to where it connects with Swann Creek, a few miles beyond U.S. Route 40.Lannell Ward, one of 23 Aberdeen High students on an environmental field trip last week, had one conclusion: "Uggh! Everything's so dirty!"
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