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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com | March 14, 2010
The problem: Stray dogs have been taking refuge in a boarded-up house in Sandtown-Winchester. The backstory: Randall Martin considers himself a dog person, but he wasn't happy with his new neighbors. Months ago, a stray dog started taking shelter in the vacant house next to his home in the 1100 block of W. Mosher St., and it was soon joined by other canines. Over time, as many as six dogs were staying there - mostly pit bull mixes. "That's a pack," he said.
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FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 29, 2013
To help stop the spread of respiratory infections among dogs at the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter (BARCS), the shelter has suspended dog intakes from June 3 through June 24. Officials at the shelter said they are seeing a higher-than-normal rate of respiratory infections among its dogs, and that because such infections can be spread from dog to dog, temporarily suspending its animal intake program is the best way to keep things from getting...
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NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1999
For years, the Frankford Improvement Association has fought to protect its Northeast Baltimore neighborhood from urban blight. Yet there's always been at least one seemingly unconquerable foe: Strathdale Manor.The 123-building apartment complex spread over 18 acres has been vacant since April 1997. It has become a shelter for the homeless, a refuge for stray dogs and a dumping ground littered with old furniture, dirty clothes and discarded tires.But relief could come soon to the neighborhood that has endured the complex's decline.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
Once among the thousands of dogs roaming Baghdad, a city that considers strays a menace, Sara eluded traps set by police and survived a car accident - albeit with a broken leg. Lately, Sara has been spending her time in the company of a family in Bel Air, a dramatic change in fortunes brought about by a U.S. military contractor with a soft spot for neglected animals. Andrew Leeson, a U.S. Navy veteran working as a private security contractor in Iraq, found Sara and named her. He fed her, hid her from the police, paid for surgery to right her front paw and made it his mission to find her a home in the U.S. He connected with SPCA International and helped arrange Sara's flight from Baghdad to the U.S. When the pup landed at Washington Dulles International Airport, he knew he had finally rescued Sara.
NEWS
By Carla Baranauckas and Carla Baranauckas,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 11, 2001
WEST NEW YORK, N.J. - A motley pack of seven dogs slept near two gigantic heaters in the cavernous boiler room of a block-long blue building one recent cold evening. Night was falling on the West New York dog pound, better known as the Department of Public Works garage. The garage, where police cars, trucks and street-cleaning machines come and go at all hours, was never intended as an animal shelter. But months ago the town's health department resorted to housing stray dogs there because the shelter in Jersey City, run by the Hudson County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, was full after abruptly adopting a "no kill" policy last year.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 29, 2013
To help stop the spread of respiratory infections among dogs at the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter (BARCS), the shelter has suspended dog intakes from June 3 through June 24. Officials at the shelter said they are seeing a higher-than-normal rate of respiratory infections among its dogs, and that because such infections can be spread from dog to dog, temporarily suspending its animal intake program is the best way to keep things from getting...
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | March 23, 1994
With a jury deadlocked but leaning toward conviction, a Baltimore County jogger decided to end a seven-month fight yesterday and plead guilty to a charge of cruelty to animals for hitting a 4-month-old Dalmatian in the mouth with a baseball bat.James E. LaBoard, 48, a Mass Transit Administration bus driver for 22 years, always admitted hitting the dog, named Sparky, with a baseball bat in an incident July 26.But he testified that the dog was inches from...
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2000
An innovative program at the Thomas O'Farrell Youth Center in Carroll County is giving errant teen-agers -- and stray dogs -- a second chance at life. The residential center in Marriottsville will be the first in the state and one of few in the nation to conduct the pet therapy project that pairs abandoned dogs with troubled youths. "Research tells us that a noncritical, nonjudgmental creature can enhance a child's mental health and sense of self-worth," said Catherine Carey, planner for the Department of Juvenile Justice, which places at-risk teen-agers at O'Farrell.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1999
Something brings her to this stinking alley, some swell of emotion and purpose beneath her. Vonnie Gowe, 37, pierced nose, thick hair, is so shy before humans. But kneeling in this alley, she reaches out to a hairball of a dog. It's OK, it's OK. Come to her, dog.Dog shuffles toward Gowe's can of food, then jerks back when Gowe tries to pet his matted, stringy back. She tries to feel him with the softness of the back of her hand. She wants him home with her. But the dog retreats under a splintered porch and ducks his head, clearly in fear of some other, invisible hand.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
Once among the thousands of dogs roaming Baghdad, a city that considers strays a menace, Sara eluded traps set by police and survived a car accident - albeit with a broken leg. Lately, Sara has been spending her time in the company of a family in Bel Air, a dramatic change in fortunes brought about by a U.S. military contractor with a soft spot for neglected animals. Andrew Leeson, a U.S. Navy veteran working as a private security contractor in Iraq, found Sara and named her. He fed her, hid her from the police, paid for surgery to right her front paw and made it his mission to find her a home in the U.S. He connected with SPCA International and helped arrange Sara's flight from Baghdad to the U.S. When the pup landed at Washington Dulles International Airport, he knew he had finally rescued Sara.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com | March 14, 2010
The problem: Stray dogs have been taking refuge in a boarded-up house in Sandtown-Winchester. The backstory: Randall Martin considers himself a dog person, but he wasn't happy with his new neighbors. Months ago, a stray dog started taking shelter in the vacant house next to his home in the 1100 block of W. Mosher St., and it was soon joined by other canines. Over time, as many as six dogs were staying there - mostly pit bull mixes. "That's a pack," he said.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2003
A stray dog found wandering without a collar on U.S. 29 in Columbia has become the unwitting prize in a tug of war between a would-be rescuer and the Howard County Animal Shelter. The reddish-brown, fuzzy-haired, female chow chow found hiding under a car March 8 has been classified not suitable for adoption - a death sentence at the Howard pound - because, although she seemed friendly at first, she later changed, growling and baring her teeth, according to county police Maj. Jeff Spaulding, who oversees the shelter.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2003
A stray dog found wandering without a collar on U.S. 29 in Columbia has become the unwitting prize in a tug of war between a would-be rescuer and the Howard County Animal Shelter. The reddish-brown, fuzzy-haired, female chow chow found hiding under a car March 8 has been classified not suitable for adoption - a death sentence at the Howard pound - because, although she seemed friendly at first, she later changed, growling and baring her teeth, according to county police Maj. Jeff Spaulding, who oversees the shelter.
NEWS
By Carla Baranauckas and Carla Baranauckas,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 11, 2001
WEST NEW YORK, N.J. - A motley pack of seven dogs slept near two gigantic heaters in the cavernous boiler room of a block-long blue building one recent cold evening. Night was falling on the West New York dog pound, better known as the Department of Public Works garage. The garage, where police cars, trucks and street-cleaning machines come and go at all hours, was never intended as an animal shelter. But months ago the town's health department resorted to housing stray dogs there because the shelter in Jersey City, run by the Hudson County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, was full after abruptly adopting a "no kill" policy last year.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2000
An innovative program at the Thomas O'Farrell Youth Center in Carroll County is giving errant teen-agers -- and stray dogs -- a second chance at life. The residential center in Marriottsville will be the first in the state and one of few in the nation to conduct the pet therapy project that pairs abandoned dogs with troubled youths. "Research tells us that a noncritical, nonjudgmental creature can enhance a child's mental health and sense of self-worth," said Catherine Carey, planner for the Department of Juvenile Justice, which places at-risk teen-agers at O'Farrell.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 6, 1999
Gene Hackman, the Academy Award-winning actor -- and one of our faves, darling -- has been in Baltimore since late summer for the filming of "The Replacements," marking the third time in five years he's made a movie in Maryland. Scenes for "Absolute Power" and the heavy-grossing "Enemy of the State" were filmed in and around the city. Hackman has been very positive about Baltimore. "I should have bought a house here three years ago," he said in August.He hasn't bought a house, as far as we know.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 6, 1999
Gene Hackman, the Academy Award-winning actor -- and one of our faves, darling -- has been in Baltimore since late summer for the filming of "The Replacements," marking the third time in five years he's made a movie in Maryland. Scenes for "Absolute Power" and the heavy-grossing "Enemy of the State" were filmed in and around the city. Hackman has been very positive about Baltimore. "I should have bought a house here three years ago," he said in August.He hasn't bought a house, as far as we know.
NEWS
By S. Mitra Kalita and S. Mitra Kalita,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1996
If every dog has its day, yesterday belonged to Houston, a 5-month-old stray who went home with a new family and mended leg.The black mutt underwent orthopedic surgery Tuesday -- a week after a Baltimore Zoo employee discovered him limping through Druid Hill Park. Houston spent Tuesday night in the Chesapeake Veterinary Referral Center, where a $1,000 procedure was performed at no cost to his new Severna Park family.Zoo workers often stumble on stray cats and dogs, but Houston, they say, was different.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1999
For years, the Frankford Improvement Association has fought to protect its Northeast Baltimore neighborhood from urban blight. Yet there's always been at least one seemingly unconquerable foe: Strathdale Manor.The 123-building apartment complex spread over 18 acres has been vacant since April 1997. It has become a shelter for the homeless, a refuge for stray dogs and a dumping ground littered with old furniture, dirty clothes and discarded tires.But relief could come soon to the neighborhood that has endured the complex's decline.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1999
Something brings her to this stinking alley, some swell of emotion and purpose beneath her. Vonnie Gowe, 37, pierced nose, thick hair, is so shy before humans. But kneeling in this alley, she reaches out to a hairball of a dog. It's OK, it's OK. Come to her, dog.Dog shuffles toward Gowe's can of food, then jerks back when Gowe tries to pet his matted, stringy back. She tries to feel him with the softness of the back of her hand. She wants him home with her. But the dog retreats under a splintered porch and ducks his head, clearly in fear of some other, invisible hand.
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