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NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
Flowermart, the official start of spring in Baltimore, is as much about food as it is about flowers. So it makes sense that among the women wearing hats covered in blooms there would be a guy dressed as a slice of pizza. Antoine Hays of Baltimore — he was a slice of pepperoni — was at Mount Vernon on Friday to promote an online food delivery service, as another edition of the century-old city tradition got under way. Even the plants eat at Flowermart. Carnivorous Plant Nursery, located inf Derwood in Montgomery County, was featuring a hanging basket of tropical pitcher plants that are guaranteed to attract, trap and eat your stink bugs.
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SPORTS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
For $3 a person, you can use the bathroom of Carol Hines' home on Winner St, across from Pimlico race course.  Hines decided to give entrepreneurship a try for the first time this year, one of many enterprises that pop up on Preakness day in the Park Heights and Pimlico neighborhoods.  Besides offering her restroom for Preakness attendees, Hines cooked up some of her best dishes, including jerk chicken, curry chicken and barbecue ribs. ...
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NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | May 16, 1995
What was yesterday?Hannibal Mickens had no idea. And the answer was as plain as the hat on his head.It was Straw Hat Day all across America -- May 15, the day traditionally to set aside the felt hat of winter in favor of the cooler straw hat of summer. But here in Baltimore, once the straw-hat capital of the country, it is largely a tradition lost and forgotten."Straw Hat Day?" pondered Mr. Mickens, an insurance examiner for the Maryland Insurance Administration. "I've never heard of such a thing.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
Flowermart, the official start of spring in Baltimore, is as much about food as it is about flowers. So it makes sense that among the women wearing hats covered in blooms there would be a guy dressed as a slice of pizza. Antoine Hays of Baltimore — he was a slice of pepperoni — was at Mount Vernon on Friday to promote an online food delivery service, as another edition of the century-old city tradition got under way. Even the plants eat at Flowermart. Carnivorous Plant Nursery, located inf Derwood in Montgomery County, was featuring a hanging basket of tropical pitcher plants that are guaranteed to attract, trap and eat your stink bugs.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | May 21, 1996
MAY 15 CAME and went this year, and Glimpses saw only one man wearing a straw hat. That is not the way it used to be in Baltimore.Up until World War II May 15 was "Straw Hat Day" -- the day set aside for men to switch from their winter fedoras to lighter, brighter straws.Straw Hat Day was born in Baltimore and enjoyed widespread support here because Baltimore was the world center for the manufacture of straw hats; commercial interests here promoted it strongly.A straw hat was made of braided, dried grasses of one kind or another, shaped either like the traditional felt hat or flat-topped; the latter is sometimes called a "boater" or "skimmer."
FEATURES
By Pascale Lemaire | August 11, 1991
Summer's the season for hats. But not just drab brown o black fedoras and berets made to keep heads warm. In summer, hats are a riot of color and style. Of course straw hats take center stage during the warm weather, but there's incredible diversity even among them. Whether for sun or fun, why not try one on for size?
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2001
John G. Macas, president and owner of a hat company that has kept Baltimoreans in fedoras, tweed caps and cream-colored Panamas for nearly 70 years, died Tuesday of heart failure. He was 72. Mr. Macas grew up in and worked his entire life at Ecuador Hat Co., the business that was founded by his father, Roberto Macas, in the early 1930s. Born in New York City, he was raised on Mulberry Street and attended Baltimore public schools. The elder Mr. Macas was born and raised in Ecuador and moved in 1925 to New York to work in a straw hat factory.
FEATURES
By Ferdinand M. de Leon and Ferdinand M. de Leon,Seattle Times | August 13, 1992
Seattle --Depending on your preference, straw hats today can make you look like the Godfather in gardening gear or a rakish riverboat gambler. They can be made from the leaf fibers of an African palm or woven from parts of the coconut tree. And they can come from such faraway places as China and Italy.But regardless of which exotically named style you choose, chances are you won't be the only one out there wearing it.Straw hats are back with a vengeance, according to hat merchants."Men's hats stress function," said Paul Ferry, president of Byrnie Utz Men's Hat Store.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | June 4, 1995
From The Sun June 4-10, 1845June 4: The ship Marianne, Captain Weiting, arrived yesterday from Bremen with one hundred and eighty-six passengers; they were all in a healthy condition.June 7: The extreme warm weather, and the dog days approaching, renders bathing absolutely necessary to health.From The Sun June 4-10, 1895June 4: The colored people of Baltimore County celebrated Whit-Monday, as is their custom.June 5: Confederate Memorial Day will be observed in Baltimore tomorrow with appropriate ceremonies at the Confederate Cemetery in Loudon Park.
FEATURES
By FRED RASMUSSEN and FRED RASMUSSEN,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1997
It was one of those grand sartorial conventions, closely observed and generally coinciding in these latitudes with the arrival of rising temperatures and tropical humidity in May.The seasonal ritual would find men packing away in cedar closets, mothballs and hatboxes their heavy winter suits and felt hats.Overnight, suitings would change from the somber fashions of winter to the lighter-coloredPalm Beach, linen and seersucker suits of summer. Head wear suddenly became jaunty, as straw boaters or the more formal optimo Panamas with center crease and thin black band began appearing on local craniums.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2010
One of the most rewarding pleasures of this job is interacting with readers who contact me with colorful comments or additional insights and observations about someone or something I've written about. Sometimes they also write letters and e-mails or call on the phone to correct me, and I'm most grateful for informed and correct criticism. The death last month of noted Baltimore artist Ann Didusch Schuler, who co-founded the Schuler School of Fine Arts with her husband, Hans C. Schuler, brought calls and e-mails from several former students who are now professional artists or teachers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2010
Eddie Jacobs, the venerable Light Street haberdasher, remembers when May 15 — Straw Hat Day in Baltimore — was a big deal. "I'll never forget when I came home from the service. It was in January," said Jacobs, 71, whose father established the men's store, Eddie Jacobs, in 1939 that is known for its conservative suits and men's furnishings. "He asked me how soon I could get to the store, and I said I'd take a shower and be there within an hour," Jacobs recalled.
NEWS
By Nora Achrati and Nora Achrati,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2002
Hunting for the perfect Easter bonnet is a little like playing Goldilocks at the Three Bears' house: some are too big, some are too small, and sometimes, there's one that's just right. "Some like them wide, some like them small," says Josephine Murray, sales clerk at Mauri, a Mondawmin Mall hat shop in West Baltimore. "They like all kinds." Easter week has brought scores of men and women to hat stores in search of the right 10-gallon chapeau or 2-ounce pillbox. It's an annual rite of spring that, come Sunday, will be in full array throughout the Baltimore area.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2001
John G. Macas, president and owner of a hat company that has kept Baltimoreans in fedoras, tweed caps and cream-colored Panamas for nearly 70 years, died Tuesday of heart failure. He was 72. Mr. Macas grew up in and worked his entire life at Ecuador Hat Co., the business that was founded by his father, Roberto Macas, in the early 1930s. Born in New York City, he was raised on Mulberry Street and attended Baltimore public schools. The elder Mr. Macas was born and raised in Ecuador and moved in 1925 to New York to work in a straw hat factory.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1999
As a whole pig roasted on a grill outside, the congregation of Rising Sun First Baptist Church -- some wearing bib overalls and straw hats -- celebrated a "Down Home Sunday" yesterday, remembering their ancestors who had toiled in slavery and suffered in segregation.Instead of a choir, singing was accompanied by the rhythm of a washboard. Rather than church bulletins to announce the order of worship, the congregation followed the direction of the pastor, the Rev. Emmett C. Burns Jr.Yesterday's event -- the church's second annual -- was held to "pay respect to those of our race who didn't have the privileges we have," Burns said.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg: SUN STAFF | July 16, 1998
Rock stars aren't the best role models, especially when it comes to outdoor summer concert wear.At the sticky HFStival in Washington in May, the Mighty Mighty Bosstones wore full, dark zoot suits, and select B52s sported sequins, stockings and spiked heels.They looked cool, but you can be sure they didn't feel that way. Do not take your summer concert fashion cue from the performers. They're getting paid to put on those get-ups.You, on the other hand, paid to watch them in those get-ups and need to be a tad more practical.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook | February 14, 1991
YOUR TURN Each Thursday we're going to bring you money-saving tips for all members of the family, and we want ideas. Perhaps you know of a super source for stylish bargains or brand of pantyhose that never runs or maybe you just have a question.You can call any time using SUNDIAL. With a touch-tone phone, you call 783-1800 (or 268-7736 from Anne Arundel County) and enter code 4620.Or you can send a letter to Catherine Cook, Features Department, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278.Rework and recycleSome of those old favorites languishing in the back of your closet could be turned into stylish candidates for this spring's wardrobe if you use some imagination, suggests Linda Scherr, co-owner of Rococo, a specialty store in the Commercentre.
SPORTS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
For $3 a person, you can use the bathroom of Carol Hines' home on Winner St, across from Pimlico race course.  Hines decided to give entrepreneurship a try for the first time this year, one of many enterprises that pop up on Preakness day in the Park Heights and Pimlico neighborhoods.  Besides offering her restroom for Preakness attendees, Hines cooked up some of her best dishes, including jerk chicken, curry chicken and barbecue ribs. ...
FEATURES
By FRED RASMUSSEN and FRED RASMUSSEN,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1997
It was one of those grand sartorial conventions, closely observed and generally coinciding in these latitudes with the arrival of rising temperatures and tropical humidity in May.The seasonal ritual would find men packing away in cedar closets, mothballs and hatboxes their heavy winter suits and felt hats.Overnight, suitings would change from the somber fashions of winter to the lighter-coloredPalm Beach, linen and seersucker suits of summer. Head wear suddenly became jaunty, as straw boaters or the more formal optimo Panamas with center crease and thin black band began appearing on local craniums.
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