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NEWS
June 12, 2003
On Tuesday, June 10, 2003, BERT S. STRAUS, beloved husband of Ruth Straus (nee Hilb), loving father of Miriam Czeisler of Randolph, NJ., Dr. Justin Straus of Teaneck, NJ. and Irene Pomper of Highland Park, NJ., dear father-in-law of Dr. Jeffrey Czeisler, Robin Straus and Neal Pomper, beloved brother of the late Julius and Martha Straus, loving grandfather of twelve. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS. INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Wednesday, June 11, at 4 P.M. Interment at the Chevra Ahavas Chesed Cemetery of Randallstown, MD. Please omit flowers.
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FEATURES
By L'Oreal Thompson and For The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
Wedding day: Sept. 2, 2012 The bride: Julie Straus-Harris, 32, grew up in Potomac. She is a law clerk in the Baltimore chambers of Judge Diana Gribbon Motz of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit. Her late father, Dr. Stephen E. Straus, was the director of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda. Her mother, Barbara E. Straus, retired as the assistant to the principal at Charles E. Smith Jewish Day School in Rockville.
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NEWS
By VICTORIA BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 30, 1997
"The Paper Trail," by Dorothea Straus. Moyer Bell. 240 pages. $22.95.As the millennium approaches the memoir has become the trendiest of literary forms. Everyone and their dog is writing a memoir, from Generation X-er memoirs to tortured youth to octogenarian memoirs of equally tortured longevity. Into that heralding trumpet blast comes Dorothea Straus' lilting collection, The Paper Trail."Closer to octogenarians than to Gen-Xers, Straus has led the sort of intriguing life attendant to immense privilege; reading these reminiscences captivates.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN REPORTER | June 19, 2007
Neither Dr. Gerald Maher, team dentist for the New England Patriots, nor Bert Straus, an industrial design engineer in Baltimore, will attend the NFL's concussion conference in Chicago today. But what they have to offer may be relevant to the continuing debate over concussions. Maher says he has a mouth guard the Patriots use that can cut down on concussions originating in the jaw. Straus says he has expanded the technology he used to create a protective cover over Mark Kelso's helmet in the late 1980s after the former Buffalo Bills safety experienced a number of concussions.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1997
They painted over the sign on the little shop on Hamilton Street called The Artisans the other day, and I felt that pang of regret you feel when you leave an old friend you may never see again.The splendid and formidable Miss Ada Gutman Straus reigned over a realm of silver and china and crystal at the 5 Hamilton St. shop for half a century like a dowager queen exiled out of her time. The Artisans survived as a treasured relic from the era when Charles Street was the grand shopping street for the rich and pampered who lived in the great mansions of Mount Vernon.
NEWS
December 25, 1990
Karl H. Hinke, 84, a longtime banking executive who created the MasterCard credit card, died Saturday in East Aurora, N.Y. Mr. Hinke was former chairman of the Interbank Card Association and a retired executive of Marine Midland Bank, where he worked for 55 years. MasterCard, originally called Master Charge, was started by Buffalo-based Marine Midland in 1966 at the urging of Mr. Hinke, who was then executive vice president of the bank. The trial credit card operation was started in Binghamton and spread to Jamestown,Syracuse, Rochester and Buffalo.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN REPORTER | June 19, 2007
Neither Dr. Gerald Maher, team dentist for the New England Patriots, nor Bert Straus, an industrial design engineer in Baltimore, will attend the NFL's concussion conference in Chicago today. But what they have to offer may be relevant to the continuing debate over concussions. Maher says he has a mouth guard the Patriots use that can cut down on concussions originating in the jaw. Straus says he has expanded the technology he used to create a protective cover over Mark Kelso's helmet in the late 1980s after the former Buffalo Bills safety experienced a number of concussions.
NEWS
March 28, 2007
SYLVIA STRAUS HESCHEL, 94 Pianist, wife of theologian Sylvia Straus Heschel, a pianist and the widow of the prominent theologian Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel died Monday in New York, her daughter said. Rabbi Heschel taught Jewish ethics and mysticism at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York, where he combined scholarship with a strong moral passion that led him to march with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and to oppose the war in Vietnam. The Heschels' daughter, Susannah Heschel, said her parents met during World War II in Cincinnati, where her mother was studying the piano and her father, a refugee from Nazi-occupied Poland, was teaching at Hebrew Union College.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF Sun writer Laura Lippman contributed to this report | November 20, 1998
Groggily she answered when the phone rang at 7:45 a.m. yesterday in her room at the New York Helmsley Windsor.Alice McDermott? This year's winner of the National Book Award for fiction? The Bethesda mom of three, wife, teacher at Johns Hopkins, Irish Catholic girl from Red Hook, L.I.?Was that really her in the spotlight Wednesday night at the Marriott Marquis Hotel? Her husband on the right and Roger Straus, chair of Farrar Straus & Giroux, on the left, Straus pushing her for her next book already.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | September 1, 2006
Magna Entertainment Corp., the Canadian owner of a dozen North American horse racetracks, including Pimlico and Laurel Park, said yesterday that it bought the remaining 70 percent stake in AmTote International Inc. of Hunt Valley - a pioneer of the electronic bet-processing system in the racing industry. Magna paid $13.6 million for the rest of the privately held company, which more than 70 years ago single-handedly changed the face of racing by installing the first electronic system to process bets during the Great Depression.
NEWS
March 28, 2007
SYLVIA STRAUS HESCHEL, 94 Pianist, wife of theologian Sylvia Straus Heschel, a pianist and the widow of the prominent theologian Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel died Monday in New York, her daughter said. Rabbi Heschel taught Jewish ethics and mysticism at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York, where he combined scholarship with a strong moral passion that led him to march with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and to oppose the war in Vietnam. The Heschels' daughter, Susannah Heschel, said her parents met during World War II in Cincinnati, where her mother was studying the piano and her father, a refugee from Nazi-occupied Poland, was teaching at Hebrew Union College.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | September 1, 2006
Magna Entertainment Corp., the Canadian owner of a dozen North American horse racetracks, including Pimlico and Laurel Park, said yesterday that it bought the remaining 70 percent stake in AmTote International Inc. of Hunt Valley - a pioneer of the electronic bet-processing system in the racing industry. Magna paid $13.6 million for the rest of the privately held company, which more than 70 years ago single-handedly changed the face of racing by installing the first electronic system to process bets during the Great Depression.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Bill Atkinson and Jamie Smith Hopkins and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2004
Investors with little economic news to go on but plenty of terrorism fears sent U.S. stocks sharply downward yesterday. The Dow Jones industrial average sank 121.85 points, 1.2 percent, while the Nasdaq composite index shed 30.57 points, 1.58 percent. The Standard & Poor's 500 index lost 14.38 points, a total of 1.3 percent. "Emotion's at center stage," said Andy Brooks, vice president and head of equity trading at T. Rowe Price Associates Inc. in Baltimore. "We were captive to the geopolitical stuff today."
NEWS
June 12, 2003
On Tuesday, June 10, 2003, BERT S. STRAUS, beloved husband of Ruth Straus (nee Hilb), loving father of Miriam Czeisler of Randolph, NJ., Dr. Justin Straus of Teaneck, NJ. and Irene Pomper of Highland Park, NJ., dear father-in-law of Dr. Jeffrey Czeisler, Robin Straus and Neal Pomper, beloved brother of the late Julius and Martha Straus, loving grandfather of twelve. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS. INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Wednesday, June 11, at 4 P.M. Interment at the Chevra Ahavas Chesed Cemetery of Randallstown, MD. Please omit flowers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2001
James E. Clark, an AmTote customer service representative who was responsible for the operation of computer systems and terminals used for parimutuel wagering at thoroughbred race tracks, died Tuesday of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 79. Known as "Mr. AmTote," the Mays Chapel resident spent 52 years with the Hunt Valley company and became one of horse racing's most well known and highly respected figures. He spent his workdays visiting tracks in Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Kentucky and Mexico.
NEWS
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2000
Unlike most Americans, Dr. Stephen Straus does not spend a cent on alternative medicine. Twenty-three years as a scientist in the labs at the National Institutes of Health have left him skeptical of mysterious palliatives, fabulous marketing claims and the power of suggestion. He is so conventional that he includes his one regular daily ritual -- downing a single multivitamin and an aspirin -- among the wild assortment of "alternative" treatments ascribed to by legions of believers. For the first time in its controversial history, the alternative medicine headquarters at NIH has one of its own at the helm, a confident scientist and a New Yorker who questions commercial markets, unexamined toxic properties, flimsy clinical studies and the vulnerability of an American public smitten by a bug to accept even the most peculiar trends in self-care.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Bill Atkinson and Jamie Smith Hopkins and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2004
Investors with little economic news to go on but plenty of terrorism fears sent U.S. stocks sharply downward yesterday. The Dow Jones industrial average sank 121.85 points, 1.2 percent, while the Nasdaq composite index shed 30.57 points, 1.58 percent. The Standard & Poor's 500 index lost 14.38 points, a total of 1.3 percent. "Emotion's at center stage," said Andy Brooks, vice president and head of equity trading at T. Rowe Price Associates Inc. in Baltimore. "We were captive to the geopolitical stuff today."
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | December 13, 1998
WHEN JULIA was 12, her self-confidence began to drain out of her like air from a leaking balloon. Her mother could actually see her shrink and withdraw. Julia was stressed and she was worried and she was confused.The child thought prayer might help, but she knew "Now I lay me down to sleep" wasn't going to do it, so she asked her mother to write her a new prayer. Celia Straus, a Washington documentary writer, did - that night and every night for a year. She pinned each prayer to her daughter's pillow, and in those prayers were the words Julia could not find to express her confusion, her hopes, her joys.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | December 13, 1998
WHEN JULIA was 12, her self-confidence began to drain out of her like air from a leaking balloon. Her mother could actually see her shrink and withdraw. Julia was stressed and she was worried and she was confused.The child thought prayer might help, but she knew "Now I lay me down to sleep" wasn't going to do it, so she asked her mother to write her a new prayer. Celia Straus, a Washington documentary writer, did - that night and every night for a year. She pinned each prayer to her daughter's pillow, and in those prayers were the words Julia could not find to express her confusion, her hopes, her joys.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF Sun writer Laura Lippman contributed to this report | November 20, 1998
Groggily she answered when the phone rang at 7:45 a.m. yesterday in her room at the New York Helmsley Windsor.Alice McDermott? This year's winner of the National Book Award for fiction? The Bethesda mom of three, wife, teacher at Johns Hopkins, Irish Catholic girl from Red Hook, L.I.?Was that really her in the spotlight Wednesday night at the Marriott Marquis Hotel? Her husband on the right and Roger Straus, chair of Farrar Straus & Giroux, on the left, Straus pushing her for her next book already.
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