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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2011
Michael Pollan's appearance at the Baltimore Speaker Series isn't until January, but there is something I urgently need to tell you about him. The author of the "Omnivore's Dilemma" and "In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto" is coming to the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall on Jan. 12, 2012 as part of the Baltimore Speaker Series . UPDATE: You don't have to wait untl January to see Michael Pollan. The New York Times contributing writer will open the Strathmore's 2011-21 Speaker Series on Wendesday, Oct. 26 at 8 p.m., in the Music Center.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra could have included just a little sample of Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" to go with its latest program, which includes the overture and incidental music Mendelssohn wrote under the spell of that play. But this is an all-out production, and a beguiling one at that. Created in association with Washington's superb Folger Theatre, the semi-staged presentation, cleverly adapted and directed by Edward Berkeley, provides a generous helping of "Midsummer.
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FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | February 3, 2005
The sparkling $100 million Music Center at Strathmore, which officially opens today, isn't just a building in which to hear music. It's a leap of faith into the future. A lot of people have a great deal at stake in Strathmore. For the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, facing a debt expected to reach $12 million by 2008, the hall means access to a new group of ticket buyers and donors. For Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan, it's a feather in his cap at a time when he's frequently mentioned as a possible candidate for governor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
The scary snow forecast was not enough to deter a decent-sized crowd from trekking to Strathmore Wednesday night for a concert by the St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra led by its longtime music director Yuri Temirkanov. I, for one, would have risked even more threatening weather for the opportunity to experience this level of artistry. Many of us will never forget the magic Temirkanov so frequently ignited during his all-too-brief tenure at the helm of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, so any chance to reconnect with the conductor's soulful style is a big deal (several BSO players and the orchestra's president were in the Strathmore audience Wednesday)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
The scary snow forecast was not enough to deter a decent-sized crowd from trekking to Strathmore Wednesday night for a concert by the St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra led by its longtime music director Yuri Temirkanov. I, for one, would have risked even more threatening weather for the opportunity to experience this level of artistry. Many of us will never forget the magic Temirkanov so frequently ignited during his all-too-brief tenure at the helm of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, so any chance to reconnect with the conductor's soulful style is a big deal (several BSO players and the orchestra's president were in the Strathmore audience Wednesday)
NEWS
By Rashod Ollison | September 9, 2005
Dora the Explorer, Arnold and the Powerpuff Girls will all be present at Family Toon Day, Oct. 2, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Music Center at Strathmore (5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda). Events and activities include a parade featuring Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon characters, music, dance, and arts and crafts, as well as carnival rides and food. Admission is free; advance tickets (limit 10 per person) are required. Go online to strathmore.org, or get them in person at the Strathmore ticket office or various Comcast locations.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 7, 2006
A year ago, the Baltimore-Washington cultural scene received a boost from the opening of the Music Center at Strathmore. For the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, which had a pivotal role in getting the venue off the ground, the new center has provided a second home. The orchestra plays to an average capacity of 88 percent there; it's closer to 60 percent at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall in Baltimore. "It has been a wonderful success, better in most ways than we could have hoped for," says Michael Mael, BSO vice president for Strathmore.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 23, 2004
The $100 million Music Center at Strathmore will heat up the region's cultural calendar with a starry lineup for its inaugural season, ranging from the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra to quintessential Broadway diva Barbara Cook and fresh jazz musicians Dee Dee Bridgewater and Peter Cincotti. Opening Feb. 5, with the BSO, conductor Yuri Temirkanov, cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the premiere of a piece by exceptional young composer Michael Hersch, the center in North Bethesda will kick into high gear quickly.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 9, 2005
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, fresh from playing to large, enthusiastic audiences during a European tour, is back to reality and fiscal priorities in Maryland, where low ticket sales and high costs have led to the cancellation of events at two venues. Most of the cancellations are at the orchestra's second home, the Music Center at Strathmore in Montgomery County, starting with a series of family concerts scheduled for launch Saturday. A sluggish box office and/or high production costs are blamed.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 21, 2003
That's show biz. The final steel beam for the roof of the Music Center at Strathmore did not ascend right on cue, despite the pre-arranged cheers and thumbs-up signal from dozens of well-wishers at yesterday's "topping out" ceremony for the $90 million, 2,000-seat concert hall and educational complex that will become the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's second home. And one of the BSO trumpeters scheduled to perform in the brass quintet for the occasion didn't make it. This might be the only time things haven't gone smoothly for this remarkable cultural project, which is on schedule for an opening by February 2005, if not a month or two earlier.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
The latest program from the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is as safe as it comes - an old-fashioned mix of 19th-century fare. But with one of the BSO's regular guests, German-born conductor Jun Markl, back on the podium, you can count on considerable energy and sensitivity to give the familiar fare a good jolt. Those qualities are also much in evidence from the other guest for this program, German-Canadian cellist Johannes Moser, in his BSO debut. On Thursday night at the Music Center at Strathmore, Markl got things started with a genial account of Dvorak's lovely Serenade for Strings.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | October 25, 2013
When Brian Ganz performs a solo recital for the Sundays at Three series on Sunday, Oct. 27, he won't have any trouble finding Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. The classical pianist knows the local roads like he knows his way around a keyboard. Ganz, 53, qualifies as a hometown favorite. He grew up in Columbia and likes to return for concerts. He has played for the Sundays at Three series before, and he also has appeared with the Columbia Orchestra. Born in Takoma Park, Ganz moved to Columbia when he was 9 years old. Although he attended Wilde Lake High School, Ganz arguably qualifies as its most celebrated dropout.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Officially, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's 2013-14 season opened last week. Musically, I'd say it really got going last night, when the ensemble kicked into high gear to deliver sterling performances of works by Leonard Bernstein and Maurice Ravel. Music director Marin Alsop has given Bernstein, her mentor, a prominent place in the BSO's programming and discography -- a Naxos recording of his compelling "Mass" earned a Grammy nomination a few years ago. This week, Alsop is focusing on the composer's Symphony No. 2, "Age of Anxiety," which Naxos will record during concerts at Meyerhoff Hall Friday and Saturday.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | September 26, 2013
The Sundays at Three chamber music series is just a short drive away for Howard County residents, because its concerts are performed at Christ Episcopal Church, in Columbia. This can be as much of an advantage for the performers as for the audience. "It's nice to be living here," acknowledges clarinetist William Jenken, who is among the performers at the season-opening concert at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 29. A member of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra since 1998, Jenken moved to Columbia from Baltimore in 1999.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra musicians ratified a new three-year contract Friday that will include the restoration of salary cuts that were made in the wake of the economic downturn. By the 2015-2016 season, annual base salary for tenured musicians will reach $75,024, an 11 percent increase over the base of $67,600 under the previous contract, which expired Sept. 8. Players will also receive a benefit in the form of increased employer contributions to medical insurance plans and pension plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
To wrap up its subscription season, the Baltimore Symphony is performing one of those surefire works beloved by orchestra box offices everywhere, Carl Orff's earthy cantata "Carmina Burana. " In a nice move, music director Marin Alsop has balanced this overly familiar item with some relatively out-in-left-field fare -- percussion works by brilliant Baltimore-born Christopher Rouse and a pulsing orchestral showpiece by undervalued Mexican composer Silvestre Revueltas. All of this music has in common propulsive, exuberant rhythms, which made for quite a kinetic experience Thursday night at Strathmore.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | April 17, 2007
A celebration of the first African-American opera company, Tony Award-winning Broadway veterans, notable dance and symphonic ensembles, and golden-oldie rock groups are among the events likely to draw a good deal of attention during the Music Center at Strathmore's 2007-2008 season. The lineup, announced yesterday, includes the center's first original production. This new work, Free to Sing, will tell the 19th-century story of Washington's Colored American Opera Company, which was formed in 1873.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | August 12, 2008
Back in the day, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's summer season at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall steered a fairly straight classical course. Sometimes, there were substantive chamber music programs as appetizers before the orchestral concerts. Edible appetizers were available several years, along with lots of other refreshments, on sale outside the hall before the main event. Wine tastings were tried out, too, along the way. And after the BSO's final notes of the evening, the action often moved back outside for food, drink and dancing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
If you missed Thursday night's Baltimore Symphony Orchestra concert at Meyerhoff Hall -- and, based on a glance around the room, a whole heckuva lot of you missed it -- there's another chance Friday (Strathmore gets the program Saturday). It's time well spent, I'd say. Carlos Kalmar, music director of the Oregon Symphony, is back for another podium visit and, as usual, leads the BSO with a calm authority that yields a fully committed response. In the big-ticket item on the bill, a 10-movement suite from Prokofiev's brilliant and riveting ballet "Romeo and Juliet," Kalmar did not burrow as deeply as some into the score's emotional turbulence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2012
Kevin Costner, a superstar for two dozen years, hasn't had a big film hit in years. But overseas and out of camera sight, he's been renewing connections with international fans — as a singer. Releasing CDs in Europe while performing on three continents, he's won a global following as a country-tinged rocker, punching out songs that fit his native-Californian, rambling-child-of-the-'60s spirit. And now he's bringing it all back home. Costner and his band, Modern West, are putting the final touches on a concept album inspired by the History Channel miniseries, "Hatfields & McCoys," a three-night dramatization of the epochal feud starring Costner as "Devil" Anse Hatfield, airing Memorial Day weekend.
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