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NEWS
September 25, 2013
I hope all Republicans in Congress read Peter Morici's column and seriously consider it ( "A government shutdown isn't the best way to attack Obamacare," Sept. 23). Even when I disagree with Mr. Morici's stand on different subjects, he presents his viewpoint in such a way that one can understand it and respect it. Marie Mullen, Joppa
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
The sharp reduction in violent crime that occurred on Martin O'Malley's watch as mayor of Baltimore is a central theme of the speech he gives as he travels the country and lays the groundwork for a presidential campaign. But ongoing criticism from the city's current mayor could focus attention on an aspect of O'Malley's crime-fighting record he never mentions in New Hampshire or Iowa: A soaring arrest rate during his tenure in Baltimore that angered civil rights groups and locked the city into a yearslong legal dispute.
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NEWS
January 22, 2013
How can Republicans believe it is legitimate to blackmail the country into accepting the same extreme agenda that the American people rejected at the ballot box in November? The Republican Party is threatening to shut down the federal government again over raising the debt ceiling in yet another game of "chicken. " This could seriously damage the economy. The last time they played this game, 2011, Republicans sabotaged confidence in the U.S. economy and were responsible for the downgrade in our credit rating, effectively strangling the economic recovery.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | October 8, 2014
According to a new federal database put online last week, pharmaceutical companies and device makers paid doctors some $380 million in speaking and consulting fees over a five-month period in 2013. Some doctors received over $500,000 each, and some got millions of dollars in royalties from products they helped develop. Doctors claim these payments have no effect on what they prescribe. But why would drug companies shell out all of this money if it didn't provide them a healthy return on their investment?
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | April 19, 2012
There's a scene in the movie "Pretty Woman" where the kindhearted hooker played by Julia Roberts asks her client, portrayed by Richard Gere: "Who do you want me to be?" Regardless of who she might really be, she realizes that it's far less attractive than a tabula rasa onto which her client can project his own desires, and around which she can then build a tailor-made, palatable persona. It's essentially the same principle that dating-and-mating books recommend adopting when suggesting that women retain an air of mystery at the outset of a relationship and be the first to hang up in phone conversations with a man. The idea underpinning these contortions is that whoever you truly are is less attractive than whatever someone can project onto you, so you should let them continue to dream about who and what you might be for as long as possible so you can rope them in. It's a strategy sometimes seen in politics, as well -- and in the case of the upcoming French elections set for a first round of voting this weekend, it may well be the winning strategy that determines the country's next president.
NEWS
February 8, 2012
The Feb. 3 Baltimore Sun once again reported unsettling and saddening news: "Six shootings, two dead in spate of city violence. " One must ask, why does such violence continue when the mayor, police chief, elected officials, religious leaders and concerned citizens have each taken diligent steps to address the violence? What else needs to be done or what has been overlooked that the violence cannot be minimized or stopped? It's disheartening that so many noble deeds by so many people haven't quelled the violence.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2009
Officials opening the U.S. Census Bureau field office in Towson on Wednesday outlined strategies for counting an estimated 310 million Americans in what they called the best-planned and most-researched accounting undertaken since the count began in 1790. Households across the nation will receive questionnaires about March 15, with April 1 designated as Census Day. The Constitution mandates a census every 10 years and stipulates results be compiled and on the president's desk by year's end. The results are crucial for determining representation and deciding how about $435 billion in federal funds will be allocated annually to state and local governments.
SPORTS
By Daniel Gallen and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
Chris Davis' strategy for next week's Home Run Derby is simple. “Swing hard, and hit it far,” the first baseman said Tuesday before the Orioles hosted the Texas Rangers. Davis was selected to the American League 's Derby team Monday by New York Yankees second baseman Robinson Cano , and he spoke to the media for the first time since his selection Tuesday. Much has been made in the past about players harming their performance in the second half of the season based on messing up their swing in the Home Run Derby, but it doesn't appear that Davis is worried.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2013
Robby Gordon was on his way to winning the 1999 Indianapolis 500. His pit crew kept telling him to keep driving, but as Gordon was less than two laps from getting the checkered flag, he encountered a problem to which many can relate whether they're in a $1 million race car or a rusted clunker. Gordon's car ran out of gas. "I want to sit and cry," Gordon said that day. While one of the universal goals of racing is what race team strategists like Target Chip Ganassi's Mike Hull, whose driver, Scott Dixon, won the pole for today's race, call "full to finish" - having just enough gas left in the tank to get to the end - decisions about when to pit and when to pass often makes the difference between winning and losing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2012
I have been writing for the last two weeks about President Barack Obama's TV-Lite strategy of only doing interviews with the likes Jay Leno, MTV's Sway, US Weekly and Jon Stewart. In other words, only safe and friendly interviewers. And, indeed, as I have reported with Leno's "Tonight Show" interview , all the comedian did was lob one softball after another. Stewart and Sway asked actual questions about such matters as the deaths of four Americans in Benghazi, but they didn't follow up when the president failed to answer the question they asked -- and instead hit his campaign talking points.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 30, 2014
I went on YouTube to watch a gruesome video of a wild animal called a fisher, or fisher cat, attacking a silver fox - someone told me it would be educational, if you must know why - but I had to watch Anthony Brown tear into Larry Hogan first. It was a 30-second political ad that opened with a question: "Who is Larry Hogan?" and went on to say Hogan, the Republican candidate for governor in November's general election, opposes a woman's right to choose an abortion, even in the case of rape or incest.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
Members of both parties in the House of Representatives held their noses this week to pass legislation authorizing the president to train foreign forces to confront the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, and the Senate is due to vote on the same measure today. Many Republicans have reluctantly supported the measure even though many think it doesn't go far enough, while many Democrats back it in a show of solidarity with their party's president despite serious misgivings about where a war vote could ultimately lead.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 15, 2014
The strategy President Barack Obama has laid out to "degrade and ultimately destroy" the new Middle East terrorist peril reveals him as a man divided between combating the immediate threat and persevering in his determination get this country off "a perpetual war footing. " In clinging to his insistence that there will be no more American "boots on the ground," he is committing himself and the nation to a military compromise that adheres more to public preference than to the comprehensive approach dictated by the Pentagon.
NEWS
By Thomas Wise | September 4, 2014
Despite going by the same name, American football and what the rest of the world considers football are completely different games. They have a different level of physicality as well as an entirely different pace. Part of this difference in the pace of the game comes from the way the organizations that oversee these two sports, FIFA (Fédération Internationale de Football Association) and the NFL (National Football League), choose to monetize their games. If you caught any of The FIFA World Cup this summer you saw the games without any pauses for advertisements.
NEWS
By David Horsey | August 5, 2014
There are endless metrics to gauge whether the United States is ahead or behind other countries. Finland does education better and cheaper. Russians and central Europeans beat Americans in alcohol consumption. But it takes only five minutes for the average American to earn enough money to buy a pint of beer -- far less time than in any other nation. And, when it comes to meat consumption, only the Australians come close to matching the amount of dead animal we eat in the land of the free and the home of the obese.
NEWS
August 5, 2014
The deaths of two young men at a music festival in Howard County's Merriweather Post Pavilion Friday has prompted an investigation into whether security and screening procedures there were adequate to protect concertgoers. Officials suspect many in the audience may have been under the influence of the drug Ecstasy or "Molly," which produces a mild euphoria in users but which also has been linked to several deaths at similar events around the country. Whether Ecstasy played a role in last weekend's tragedy is unclear, but it certainly wouldn't be surprising if it turns out audience members had relatively easy access to it despite the best efforts of concert organizers and police.
NEWS
December 1, 2012
While I appreciate Baltimore City schools CEO Andrés Alonso's long-term plans to upgrade and update the system's aging buildings, let's not lose focus on more immediate and pressing needs ("City schools plan a 10-year revamp," Nov. 28). Those would include adequate restroom facilities, with functioning toilets, urinals and sinks, accessible cold drinking water for students, adequate heat during the colder months and amenities such as pencils, notebooks, books and computers. All schools also need to implement anti-bullying campaigns and provide available counseling for troubled students as well as implement a consistent disciplinary program that gives classroom teachers more autonomy when dealing with incorrigible children.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2012
For the second game in a row, Loyola went to a strategy of holding the ball and killing the clock, and for the second game in a row, the top-seeded Greyhounds had trouble with carrying out the plan. Clinging to a 7-5 lead late in the fourth quarter of Saturday's NCAA tournament semifinal against No. 4 seed Notre Dame, Loyola employed the game plan it used in the last six minutes of a 10-9 decision over Denver in the quarterfinals on May 19. The Fighting Irish were able to pressure Loyola's ball carriers and create turnovers, but the offense was unable to convert those mistakes into goals.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 3, 2014
We are coming up on the first anniversary of Baltimore's 300 Men March, when far more than that number of men - perhaps double that number - walked the length of North Avenue and back on a Friday night to protest last summer's spike in killings. It was a quickly organized event in response to a particularly sickening period in the life of the city. More than 40 people had been shot in the first couple of weeks of summer, 20 of them in a single weekend. Even with all that - lots of blood on the streets, and lots of urgency in response to it - organizers were surprised by the size of the march.
NEWS
July 2, 2014
Victims advocates are expressing dismay over a decision this week by Maryland's highest court that could lead to the removal of hundreds of names from a list of registered sex offenders in the state. The advocates say removing names from the registry could put women and children at greater risk by leaving families less able to identify potential predators in their midst. But critics of the list argue there's no evidence it has resulted in fewer sexual assaults or deterred offenders from committing such crimes.
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