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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
Just two Republicans have been elected governor of heavily Democratic Maryland in the past four decades, but state political strategists say the time has never been better for another victory. Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who after one term lost to Martin O'Malley in 2006, has been contemplating a rematch this fall, and his advisers say this week's upset victory by a Republican Senate candidate in heavily Democratic Massachusetts provides another nudge. "He is processing in his mind as to whether to run, and this is one more piece of evidence that might lead him in that direction," said Dick Hug, a longtime Ehrlich ally and lead fundraiser.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 4, 2014
Inevitably, considering the absence of a clear Republican frontrunner for the 2016 presidential election, the name of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush of the Bush family dynasty has been rushed to the fore. On his record in office and his soft-spoken personal appeal, he would seem a natural to go to the head of a list of only moderately impressive wannabes. But the immediate question is: Do American voters, after a double dose of Bushes, want another one? The fact is that memories of the two George Bush presidencies now set few GOP hearts aflutter.
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NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Staff Writer | August 19, 1992
HOUSTON -- If you listen to the hot rhetoric at the Republican convention long enough, you can get a clear picture of the lines of attack President Bush intends to take against Democratic nominee Bill Clinton through the rest of the campaign. Those lines fall into two clearly defined categories. The Bush strategists see Mr. Clinton as vulnerable both on his personal history and on his policies and performance as governor of Arkansas for 12 years. But the operative question is which group of issues will be emphasized.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2013
Legg Mason Capital Management's chief investment strategist, Michael J. Mauboussin, resigned as of Jan. 2, said Mary Athridge, Legg Mason Inc.'s spokeswoman. Mauboussin's resignation is not a surprise, and he's expected to announce his plans in the next couple of weeks, she said. Right now, Athridge said, he is focused on promoting his newest book, "The Success Equation: Untangling Skill and Luck in Business, Sports, and Investing. " Before joining the Capital Management subsidiary of Baltimore-based Legg Mason in 2004, Mauboussin was the managing director and chief U.S. investment strategist at Credit Suisse.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN REPORTER | October 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Republican congressional leaders and President Bush, trying to keep a sex-chat scandal from becoming a lethal election year battering, have turned to a well-worn playbook of damage-control techniques that strategists say could determine whether their party can keep its hold on Congress. The strategies for coping with the Mark Foley affair are familiar to any politician or corporate chieftain faced with scandal: Say you're sorry. Pledge to do better. Blame your opponents. Distance yourself from the transgression.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau Chief | October 27, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Political strategists scrambled yesterday to assess the impact of "Daughtergate" -- Ross Perot's assertion that a Republican smear campaign against his youngest daughter caused him to quit the race in July.With new polls showing support for Mr. Perot leveling off or falling slightly, the Texas billionaire strode unannounced into a news briefing and attacked reporters for questioning his integrity.His bitter tirade was sharply at odds with the relaxed, homespun image Mr. Perot has been projecting in his unprecedented TV ad blitz.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 3, 1999
WASHINGTON -- It seemed at first out of character -- Hillary Rodham Clinton using pop psychology to explain her marriage, rather than treating the subject with her usual cool detachment. But in an interview in the glossy new magazine Talk, Clinton allies say, the first lady was demonstrating another well-known quality: her political savvy.Democratic strategists say the first lady believed that if she did not confront the issue of her husband's cheating now, the matter would erupt and could hurt her later in a Senate campaign in New York.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 24, 1992
The likely fall campaign between President Bush and Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton will be the first electoral collision between the two generations that have dominated American life for the past 45 years.At age 67, Mr. Bush is, in all probability, the last who will be drawn from the "GI generation," presidents who fought as young men in World War II, manned the barricades of the Cold War and who have held the Oval Office without interruption since former President Kennedy captured the presidency more than 31 years ago.If Mr. Clinton, 45, holds on to win the Democratic race, he would become the first presidential nominee from the baby boom -- the 76-million-member generation that has revolutionized America's social mores, but not yet exerted the political influence many of its members have considered their birthright since the turbulent 1960s.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1999
Investment strategists are hoping for higher oil prices, lucrative energy competition and improved hair dryer sales as they bet on which stocks will help make 1999 another year in the longest-running bull market the nation has seen.The 16-year-old bull seemed to be turning into a bear in August, September and October when an economic meltdown in Russia and Asia and the near collapse of a mammoth hedge fund sent stock prices reeling.In six weeks, the Dow dropped nearly 20 percent from its July 17 high.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and David L. Greene and Julie Hirschfeld Davis and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 2, 2004
ORLANDO, Fla.- In the initial aftermath of John Kerry's smooth performance in his first debate against President Bush, it was easy to forget one thing: Kerry still lags behind Bush in national polls and faces the much tougher challenge at this critical stage of the race in persuading voters that he deserves their support. But after Thursday's Miami face-off, Kerry certainly seemed to have earned himself a second look. Kerry showed an audience of millions Thursday night that he could challenge Bush on the war in Iraq, the president's strongest suit, and may even have redeemed himself in the minds of some voters who wondered whether he could handle being commander in chief.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | December 4, 2012
When Gov. Martin O'Malley is stumped for a fact or a word, he typically cocks his head, turns to the side and says: "Rick. " That would be long-time aide Rick Abbruzzese, a staffer so deeply familiar with O'Malley's thinking that -- more often than not -- he can cough up the answer even if he hardly seems to be paying attention. No more. Word spread today that Abbruzzese is leaving O'Malley-land to work for the lobbying firm Rifkin, Livingston, Levitan and Silver. There Abbruzzese will join O'Malley alum Josh White , who managed the governor's 2006 gubernatorial campaign.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
By most measures, Frank Schubert, the strategist running campaigns in four states against same-sex marriage, ought to be nervous about Maryland. Multiple polls, including one recently conducted by The Baltimore Sun, show that Maryland voters in increasing numbers approve of gay marriage. Gay-rights advocates have more money, a larger and more sophisticated campaign organization and the backing of most of the state's political elite. The answer from Schubert, a longtime crusader in the country's marriage wars, is this: We haven't even started.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Paul.west@baltsun.com | January 29, 2010
Washington - -President Barack Obama plans to extend a hand to his political antagonists at a House Republican retreat today in Baltimore. But the exchange - part of his election-year attempt to generate more bipartisanship in Washington - is unlikely to alter Republican behavior, say strategists and former members of Congress from both parties. "Republicans are emboldened. They think Obama has overshot the runway, and they're going to stick with their strategy," said Scott Reed, a Republican consultant.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
Just two Republicans have been elected governor of heavily Democratic Maryland in the past four decades, but state political strategists say the time has never been better for another victory. Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who after one term lost to Martin O'Malley in 2006, has been contemplating a rematch this fall, and his advisers say this week's upset victory by a Republican Senate candidate in heavily Democratic Massachusetts provides another nudge. "He is processing in his mind as to whether to run, and this is one more piece of evidence that might lead him in that direction," said Dick Hug, a longtime Ehrlich ally and lead fundraiser.
NEWS
By Tribune Newspapers | November 7, 2009
WASHINGTON - -At least one Democratic political strategist has gotten a blunt warning from the White House to never appear on Fox News Channel, an outlet that presidential aides have depicted as not so much a news-gathering operation as a political opponent bent on damaging the Obama administration. The Democratic strategist said that shortly after an appearance on Fox he got a phone call from a White House official telling him not to be a guest on the show again. The call had an intimidating tone, he said.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,hanah.cho@baltsun.com | March 13, 2009
Peter L. Bain, a senior executive vice president in charge of affiliate management and corporate strategy at Legg Mason Inc., is leaving at the end of the month, the Baltimore money manager said yesterday. Bain, who joined the company in 2000, was not available to comment. He is leaving to pursue personal interests, a spokeswoman said. "We thank him for his nine years of dedicated service to the firm," Legg said in a statement. Bain, 50, was part of Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Mark R. Fetting's executive leadership team.
NEWS
By Mark Z. Barabak and Mark Z. Barabak,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 3, 2004
Sen. John F. Kerry enjoyed at best a modest uptick - if that - in a batch of opinion polls taken after last week's Democratic National Convention, findings consistent with the forecast of most analysts heading into the event. One survey showed President Bush gaining slightly on his Democratic challenger. And the samplings all indicate the presidential contest remains close. Strategists for the two candidates worked to put their own best spin on the latest surveys, but analysts said the results were in line with a political climate in which a great number of voters have already dug in behind their candidate.
BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis and Gail MarksJarvis,Chicago Tribune | December 28, 2008
Good riddance. When the clock strikes midnight this New Year's Eve, many will be happy to give a goodbye kiss to one of the worst years in stock market history. The trouble is that the start of 2009 doesn't look as though it will deliver much relief. As Wall Street investment strategists issue outlooks for next year, they are describing the early 2009 economy with such terms as "horrible," "awful" and "dismal," words you rarely see from individuals who tend to be optimists. They see consumers in trouble with debt and job losses, businesses struggling to borrow money and hold onto customers, and cities, counties and states trying to do more with less as pressures on consumers and businesses reduce local tax revenue.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 8, 2009
Michael Howard Davis, a lawyer and partner with Venable LLP in Towson who earlier had been a political adviser, strategist and aide to former Baltimore County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger and former Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, died Thursday of complications from a liver transplant at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 49. "I think Michael had the most brilliant political mind in the state of Maryland if not the country. He had a knack for recognizing upcoming political trends," said Mr. Ruppersberger, now a congressman from Maryland's 2nd District.
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