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By Judy Gerstel and Judy Gerstel,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 21, 1993
"Strapped," an HBO Showcase film directed by actor Forest Whitaker ("Bird," "The Crying Game"), won the award for best first feature in the category of First Cinema at the Toronto Film Festival.It beat 27 other pictures by first-time directors, including "Menace II Society," "Boxing Helena" and "Kalifornia.""Strapped" was broadcast on HBO as recently as last Saturday. No more broadcasts have been scheduled, but that could change with this surprise award."Strapped" is about a young African-American man trapped in a world of poverty and crime.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2011
Leaders of the financially-strapped company that produced the Baltimore Grand Prix have been interviewing candidates to take the helm of the group, officials said Wednesday. "Believe it or not, there are several people who have expressed interest," said Peter Collier, Baltimore Racing Development's Chief Operating Officer. Felix Dawson, a former executive with Constellation and Goldman Sachs, is among the candidates under consideration, Collier said. "It shows the caliber of the people that we're interviewing and the level of interest that we're getting," Collier said.
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FEATURES
By Diane Werts and Diane Werts,Newsday | August 20, 1993
What's it like to live in a neighborhood where the sound of gunfire outpoints car horns honking? Where kids shoot other kids? Where they don't baby-sit or mow lawns to make a few bucks, they just sell crack?You wanna know what it's like? HBO gives a taste this weekend, and it's enough to make you reassess all those stereotypes about the 'hood and its inhabitants. The movie "Strapped" (premiering Saturday night at 8) takes us onto bad-news Brooklyn streets and into the heart of the projects -- where in the movie's opening scene a 12-year-old gets wasted in a stairwell by another 12-year-old who's got a petty grievance and a handy gun.That's just for starters.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2011
Yeshivat Rambam, the financially struggling modern Orthodox Jewish day school in Baltimore, announced Sunday night that it would be closing its doors at the end of the academic year. The executive board informed parents and faculty of the June closing during two separate meetings. "Like so many private and public schools today, Rambam has not and cannot escape the pain of tough economic conditions and the consequences of rising costs and stagnant or insufficient revenues from tuitions, contributions and grants," Meyer Shields, the newly elected board president, said in prepared remarks.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Russia's recent economic history has been a series of flirtations with disaster. It has repeatedly gone to the brink, requiring assistance from the International Monetary Fund.But if its economy requires large-scale help anytime soon, it is not clear where the assistance might come from.Pinned down in Asia, the IMF -- the world's lender of last resort -- says it is strapped for cash. The IMF estimates that it has only $10 billion to $15 billion easily available to fight another national meltdown.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 16, 1999
The mother of two toddlers shot to death while they were strapped into their car seats was granted a divorce yesterday from the children's father, who is accused of killing them.A Howard County judge granted the divorce to Lisa Spicknall, whose husband, Richard Wayne Spicknall II of Laurel, has pleaded not guilty and not criminally responsible for the killings in September of his 2-year-old son, Richard Wayne Spicknall III, and his daughter, Destiny Array Spicknall, 3.The couple married Nov. 18, 1995, and separated Dec. 6, 1998.
NEWS
By Banning Lyon | October 28, 1993
I WAS one of hundreds of teen-agers put in U.S. psychiatric hospitals in the mid-'80s for such "unusual" behavior as arguing with parents or having trouble in school.Most of us were diagnosed, by non-physicians, as suffering from serious depression.A doctor would later come in to confirm the diagnosis and bill our parents' insurance companies.We were held in institutions against our will until our insurance policies ran out. At that moment, we were somehow miraculously cured and discharged.
SPORTS
November 15, 2005
"What type of grade do I give? I give a victory. That's it - a `V.'" Ellis Hobbs New England Patriots cornerback, on what type of grade he gives himself "Jail ain't built for 6-9 guys. I'll put it like this: When I was lying on the bed, I had my feet out of the bars." Keon Clark Former NBA player, on his accommodations while jailed on a child support matter "`My hat goes off to Kyle Orton,' Bears receiver Muhsin Muhammad said. Of course it did. It wasn't strapped down." Rick Morrissey Chicago Tribune, on the blustery conditions for Sunday's Bears game
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1996
Howard County police Friday are looking for a man who strapped what appeared to be sticks of dynamite to his chest and robbed the Safeway grocery store at Enchanted Forest Shopping Center in Ellicott City Thursday evening, fleeing with an undetermined amount of cash.The thief approached the office area of the store about 6:30 p.m. Thursday and handed workers a note, demanding money. The man opened his coat, displaying what store employees believed to be dynamite strapped to his chest.The employees gave the man an undetermined amount of cash and the robber fled.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 24, 2001
One of network television's most maddening habits is taking a hit feature film, scrubbing out messages that might offend the powers that be, and then repackaging the neutered end-product as a weekly series - while denying a debt to the original. That's the story of "Kate Brasher," a new CBS drama starring Mary Stuart Masterson ("Fried Green Tomatoes") as a financially strapped single mom who finds new life as a passionate victims' advocate at a community center where she herself came as a victim seeking legal help.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2010
The 33 men trapped in the Chilean mine for two months were exposed to extreme conditions, including poor air quality and 90-degree heat, which left rescuers desperate for real-time information about the miners' health. An Annapolis company, Zephyr Technology, helped fill the data void. Zephyr, a 30-person firm, provided the digital tools that allowed rescuers a half-mile above them to monitor the miners' conditions over the last month. Zephyr makes the BioHarness, a chest strap with digital sensors and wireless technology that monitor and transmit the wearer's vital signs.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, Andrea Siegel and Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2010
Police shot and killed a gunman wearing what appeared to be explosives after he took three people hostage at the Discovery Channel's headquarters Wednesday afternoon, officials said. The building was to reopen briefly Thursday for employees to return, although the lobby remained closed as police investigate. Authorities identified the gunman as James J. Lee. Lee, 43, who was upset with the channel over its programming and had a history of protesting the company, entered the building at Georgia Avenue and Colesville Road about 1 p.m., wielding a gun and wearing silver canisters later described as "explosive devices," and "told everyone to stop moving," according to police.
NEWS
By Robbie Whelan | March 26, 2010
Facing financial difficulties, Yeshivat Rambam is trying to sell its Park Heights Avenue campus. Officials at the Orthodox Jewish day school said Thursday the school would remain open through the end of the academic year, helped in part by short-term financing from the Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore. After this year, however, the school will have to relocate. In a letter to parents this week, officials referred to "perennial rumors of insolvency" and said the sale of the campus at 6300 Park Heights Ave. was inevitable.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | candy.thomson@baltsun.com | March 14, 2010
Visiting the Maryland General Assembly is like having a front-row seat at Short Attention Span Theater. Lawmakers hope you don't remember what they did to you last year and count on you not remembering two years ago. Otherwise, how do you explain the proposal to slash $1 million from the Fisheries Service budget? Remember -- there's that word -- recreational anglers by and large supported a move to nearly double many license fees to infuse the cash-strapped Fisheries Service with some financial juice.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | November 13, 2009
The state of Maryland is nearing the conclusion of talks that could transfer ownership of the state's goodwill ship, Pride of Baltimore II, before the end of the year to the nonprofit organization that has operated it since 1988. The transfer would mean one less annual bill for the cash-strapped state and free the nonprofit's fundraisers from a public perception that the ship is kept afloat by tax dollars, perhaps making it easier to raise money. Officials at Pride of Baltimore Inc. note that the state has already ended its $164,000 annual subsidy for the ship's operation and maintenance.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | August 4, 2009
With local governments cutting budgets during the recession and teachers unwilling to leave secure jobs, local school districts are hiring far fewer new teachers for the coming school year. Baltimore County will be hiring about 350 fewer teachers than it did three years ago, and Howard County will need half the number of new teachers it hired just two years ago - about 200. Anne Arundel County has hired 140 new teachers, down from 500 the year before and 700 two years ago. Even the city, which traditionally has opened schools with teacher vacancies and has unqualified teachers in some classrooms, will be hiring substantially fewer teachers, and many will come through programs such as Teach for America, which trains recent college graduates for two-year stints in urban school systems.
NEWS
November 6, 2003
WHAT, NO elephants? Whoever heard of a zoo - any self-respecting zoo - that didn't have a couple of the big, floppy-eared beasts? The Baltimore Zoo's plan to send its two resident pachyderms packing due to budget cutbacks has elicited a public outcry to rival the Great Elephant Stampede of 1949 in Gonzales, Texas. And that's saying something. But the zoo's decision to send African elephants Dolly and Anna elsewhere to be bred wasn't made lightly. It affords the financially strapped zoo a chance to responsibly cut costs while at the same time giving the loveable gray girls a chance to do what comes naturally in the hopes of preserving the breed in North America.
NEWS
By Mark Cloud | August 12, 2003
WE HAVE failed miserably. Every day our children face terrible dangers, and yet we do nothing to protect them. At this moment, an innocent child somewhere in this wealthiest nation in the history of mankind is balanced precariously on a sturdy bike with training wheels so huge that gale-force winds couldn't tip the thing over, wearing nothing but a helmet, goggles, elbow pads, biking gloves, kneepads, shin guards, sunscreen and bug repellent. Shame! Shame on us for putting our children at such horrible risk of, of something ... something really bad!
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