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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | May 16, 2008
The 2008 Baltimore Jewish Film Festival wraps Sunday with Joel Katz's Strange Fruit (2002), a look at the song of the same name made famous by Billie Holiday's hauntingly evocative 1939 recording and subsequent performances. The movie will be presented by filmmaker Ivy Meeropol, whose grandfather, Bronx, N.Y., schoolteacher Abel Meeropol, wrote the song after seeing a photograph of a Southern lynching. Showtime is 3 p.m. at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive. Admission: $9. Information: balti morejff.
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NEWS
June 6, 2014
The 27th annual Columbia Festival of the Arts brings eclectic entertainment to Howard County from June 13 to 28. This year's edition also has a thematic title, "Bringing It Home," that calls attention to the festival's hometown status. There are at least a few reasons why the festival seems to be taking stock of its place in the cultural life of Howard County. Starting at the top, Nichole Hickey, who has been the festival's executive director for the past 10 years, is retiring after this year's festival.
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NEWS
By GERALD HORNE | February 15, 1998
Billie Holiday's name is associated with many classic songs, but none has a stronger grip on my imagination than "Strange Fruit." This haunting ballad recounts the story of an all-too frequent occurrence in this nation's history: the lynching of African-Americans -- "strange fruit" dangling from trees.Between 1882 and 1950, 3,436 African-Americans were lynched, according to statistics kept by the Tuskegee Institute. This is a conservative estimate based on documented sources. It's virtually impossible to determine exactly how many African-Americans were subjected to this bestial practice because so many of these incidents either went unreported or law enforcement officials did not investigate them.
TRAVEL
By Theresa Sintetos, For The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
New Brunswick, N.J. Spring Date Night at the George Street Playhouse The work is basically done for you. Just get the tickets, and your date night is all planned. Two glasses of wine and a box of chocolates from Thomas Sweet will top off your evening after a performance of "Venus in Fur," a sultry comedy based off of the romance novel by Leopold von Sacher-Masoch. Just relax and enjoy this romantic evening. To make it a weekend getaway, book a room at the Heldrich, a hotel in downtown New Brunswick (theheldrich.com)
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2000
On a late winter night early in 1939, Billie Holiday stood on stage at New York's CafM-i Society and, with a single pin light illuminating her face, sang a new song called "Strange Fruit." "Southern trees bear a strange fruit, Blood on the leaves and blood at the root, Black body swinging in the Southern breeze, Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees. Pastoral scene of the gallant South, The bulging eyes and the twisted mouth, Scent of magnolia sweet and fresh, And the sudden smell of burning flesh!
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 28, 1993
The most telling works come at the end of "God Bless th Child," the Billie Holiday exhibit at the Eubie Blake National Museum and Cultural Center. That's because curator Lotus Do Brooks has placed there the works created in response to "Strange Fruit," Holiday's song about lynching.Oletha De Vane's "The Lady and Her Song" represents the singer standing in front of the words of the song, "Southern trees bear a strange fruit. Blood on the leaves and blood at the root . . .," partly printed across a Ku Klux Klan-style hood.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 1, 2005
A heavy tropical fruit, ponderous and overripe, sways gently beneath the twisting branch of a tree. Flowers on slender stalks burst forth in profusion from shapely vases with narrow necks and fat, bulbous bowls. And a dead fish with a hook in its mouth dangles limply from an invisible line. These and other seemingly innocuous images of fruit, fish and flowers are recurring metaphors in the extraordinary art of Joseph Norman, whose complex, elusive works on paper are on view in Amazing Grace: The Lithographs of Joseph Norman, a beautiful but harrowing exhibition at the James E. Lewis Museum of Morgan State University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | January 29, 2004
SOUL GLOW is what they called me. xxI stole the moniker from the Eddie Murphy movie Coming to America; it was the name of the curl activator Eriq LaSalle's character used on his hair. And it was my stage name in college. I did spoken word -- used to get up at the open-mike nights the Delta Sigma Theta sorority sponsored and do my thang. Many of the sistas and brothas were imitating folks: Lorenz Tate and Nia Long in Love Jones or Saul Williams in Slam. Not me. At the time, I had been spittin' original poetry for almost a decade.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 19, 1999
Not since the rockumentary "This is Spinal Tap" have the life and times of a rock band been better documented than in "Still Crazy." The difference between the two movies, of course, is that Strange Fruit, the 1970s erstwhile super-group in "Still Crazy," is fictional, while Spinal Tap is a real band. Right?Actually, Spinal Tap and Strange Fruit would make a perfect fictional double-bill in the stadium tour of your dreams -- assuming your dreams run toward sweet, if slightly pretentious, poseurs whose idea of rock and roll runs to power chords, overwrought gestures and excruciatingly long, operatic yelps.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
The 27th annual Columbia Festival of the Arts brings eclectic entertainment to Howard County from June 13 to 28. This year's edition also has a thematic title, "Bringing It Home," that calls attention to the festival's hometown status. There are at least a few reasons why the festival seems to be taking stock of its place in the cultural life of Howard County. Starting at the top, Nichole Hickey, who has been the festival's executive director for the past 10 years, is retiring after this year's festival.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | May 16, 2008
The 2008 Baltimore Jewish Film Festival wraps Sunday with Joel Katz's Strange Fruit (2002), a look at the song of the same name made famous by Billie Holiday's hauntingly evocative 1939 recording and subsequent performances. The movie will be presented by filmmaker Ivy Meeropol, whose grandfather, Bronx, N.Y., schoolteacher Abel Meeropol, wrote the song after seeing a photograph of a Southern lynching. Showtime is 3 p.m. at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive. Admission: $9. Information: balti morejff.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 1, 2005
A heavy tropical fruit, ponderous and overripe, sways gently beneath the twisting branch of a tree. Flowers on slender stalks burst forth in profusion from shapely vases with narrow necks and fat, bulbous bowls. And a dead fish with a hook in its mouth dangles limply from an invisible line. These and other seemingly innocuous images of fruit, fish and flowers are recurring metaphors in the extraordinary art of Joseph Norman, whose complex, elusive works on paper are on view in Amazing Grace: The Lithographs of Joseph Norman, a beautiful but harrowing exhibition at the James E. Lewis Museum of Morgan State University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | January 29, 2004
SOUL GLOW is what they called me. xxI stole the moniker from the Eddie Murphy movie Coming to America; it was the name of the curl activator Eriq LaSalle's character used on his hair. And it was my stage name in college. I did spoken word -- used to get up at the open-mike nights the Delta Sigma Theta sorority sponsored and do my thang. Many of the sistas and brothas were imitating folks: Lorenz Tate and Nia Long in Love Jones or Saul Williams in Slam. Not me. At the time, I had been spittin' original poetry for almost a decade.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2000
On a late winter night early in 1939, Billie Holiday stood on stage at New York's CafM-i Society and, with a single pin light illuminating her face, sang a new song called "Strange Fruit." "Southern trees bear a strange fruit, Blood on the leaves and blood at the root, Black body swinging in the Southern breeze, Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees. Pastoral scene of the gallant South, The bulging eyes and the twisted mouth, Scent of magnolia sweet and fresh, And the sudden smell of burning flesh!
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and By J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 7, 1999
At the end of "Still Crazy," Strange Fruit is about to crash and burn. The Fruit -- the fictitious '70s supergroup whose comeback attempt is the film's focus -- are on stage at a big festival, hoping to prove they still have it, when the lead singer (Bill Nighy) freaks out midway through the first number, and the performance shudders to a halt.For a moment, we're sure the band is finished. Then the keyboardist (Stephen Rea) plays a few chords, and the bassist (Jimmy Nail) steps to the microphone to sing "The Flame Still Burns."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 19, 1999
Not since the rockumentary "This is Spinal Tap" have the life and times of a rock band been better documented than in "Still Crazy." The difference between the two movies, of course, is that Strange Fruit, the 1970s erstwhile super-group in "Still Crazy," is fictional, while Spinal Tap is a real band. Right?Actually, Spinal Tap and Strange Fruit would make a perfect fictional double-bill in the stadium tour of your dreams -- assuming your dreams run toward sweet, if slightly pretentious, poseurs whose idea of rock and roll runs to power chords, overwrought gestures and excruciatingly long, operatic yelps.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and By J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 7, 1999
At the end of "Still Crazy," Strange Fruit is about to crash and burn. The Fruit -- the fictitious '70s supergroup whose comeback attempt is the film's focus -- are on stage at a big festival, hoping to prove they still have it, when the lead singer (Bill Nighy) freaks out midway through the first number, and the performance shudders to a halt.For a moment, we're sure the band is finished. Then the keyboardist (Stephen Rea) plays a few chords, and the bassist (Jimmy Nail) steps to the microphone to sing "The Flame Still Burns."
NEWS
By James E. Allen | February 15, 1998
FOR THE PAST 20 years or so, I've scoured the South in search of old photographs, folk art, quilts, handmade furniture, carvings and other collectibles. I'm a "picker," a person who buys and sells these things.Over the years, I've learned that valuable items can turn up in the bottoms of old trunks and desk drawers. Some of these items convey hope and optimism, and others speak to untold horrors.A while back, I was picking in the attic of a prominent white family in Savannah, Ga., when I discovered an old trunk that had been passed by time and generations.
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