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Strange Bedfellows

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NEWS
October 14, 2013
When I was chairman of the Maryland Racing Commission, I predicted that all sorts of interests would in the future try and nibble away at any monies directed to try and equalize the position of Maryland's horse racing and breeding industries vis-à-vis surrounding states. So Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's pandering to more insistent political forces by suggesting that the state divert some of the money to pre-K hardly comes as a shock ("Gansler expands pre-K idea," Oct. 11). What fascinates me is that House Speaker Michael E. Busch, who during the administration of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. did everything in his power to prevent the implementation of slots legislation and contemptuously dismissed those who raised concerns about the decline of those once great industries ("the average age of the typical horseplayer is dead")
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NEWS
April 3, 2014
All those who feel they must profess their faith before governmental meetings should realize that the rights of other faiths and non-believers are just as important as theirs ( "As Carroll debates prayer, founding fathers' faith comes into focus ," March 29). I think a moment of silence would be sufficient for individuals to call upon whatever force they feel will help them in their decision making. Christians should remember their history. Religion was used politically throughout time for world domination.
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EXPLORE
By Steve Schuster | May 16, 2011
Welcome to the new home of Strange Bedfellows. Please book mark the address of our new blog - http://www.baltimoresun.com/explore/baltimorecounty/news/politics/strange-bedfellows-blog/ We have changed addresses and are on a new blogging platform. We are excited to see what we can do here and are able to do more features and create more interactive content. Stay tuned.
NEWS
October 14, 2013
When I was chairman of the Maryland Racing Commission, I predicted that all sorts of interests would in the future try and nibble away at any monies directed to try and equalize the position of Maryland's horse racing and breeding industries vis-à-vis surrounding states. So Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's pandering to more insistent political forces by suggesting that the state divert some of the money to pre-K hardly comes as a shock ("Gansler expands pre-K idea," Oct. 11). What fascinates me is that House Speaker Michael E. Busch, who during the administration of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. did everything in his power to prevent the implementation of slots legislation and contemptuously dismissed those who raised concerns about the decline of those once great industries ("the average age of the typical horseplayer is dead")
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Musicians collaborate all the time; so do actors. But artists, not really - and that goes double for street art, where making an individual mark is the name of the game. That's why one of Baltimore's best-known street artists had to try it. The result is a head-turning show called ZimZum, opening Saturday at the Creative Alliance . It features an expansive indoor and outdoor group effort between Baltimore Love Project founder Michael Owen and the artists Gaia and Momo. "Most street artists just want to put their voice up on a wall," Owen says.
NEWS
September 23, 1994
For a prime example of how politics makes strange bedfellows, look no further than the odd alliance behind the successful effort to place a term limit measure on the Nov. 8 ballot in Baltimore. If the proposal is approved by voters, the city charter would be saddled with an ill-advised amendment restricting the mayor, the comptroller and all City Council members to two four-year terms.Organizers and backers of the ballot initiative include C. Nelson Warfield, a Montgomery County lawyer reportedly tied to a Chicago public relations firm that has assisted the campaign; Penn Parking owner Lisa Renshaw, who lives in Anne Arundel County and ran unsuccessfully in the 1992 Republican primary in Maryland's First Congressional District; former U.S. Ambassador to Austria Ronald S. Lauder of the Estee Lauder cosmetics dynasty, who failed in last year's Republican mayoral primary in New York City; and Baltimore activist Morning Sunday, who paid petitioners for each signature they obtained, a dubious tactic borrowed from the National Rifle Association's book.
NEWS
October 12, 2011
Since a redistricting commission presented its plans for new congressional maps to Gov. Martin O'Malley, two groups have been particularly vocal in their complaints that it dilutes minority votes: African-American and Hispanic Democrats, and Republican elected officials. The first camp includes Rep. Donna Edwards, a Democrat who is angry that she would lose a minority-heavy Montgomery County portion of her district and pick up many white areas in Anne Arundel County instead. The second includes state Sens.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The old saw that politics makes strange bedfellows was never truer than it is now, in the domestic debate over the expansion of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) to include three former Iron Curtain countries -- Poland, Hungary and what is now the Czech Republic.Speaking out against the move pushed vigorously by President Clinton and backed with varying degrees of enthusiasm by the other NATO members are such conservative figures as Republican Sen. Jesse Helms of North Carolina and such liberals as Democratic Sen. Tom Harkin of Iowa, with Democratic Sen. Paul Wellstone of Minnesota, perhaps the most outspoken liberal in the Senate, expressing serious skepticism.
NEWS
February 7, 1991
Nancy Kulp, 69, who played starchy secretary Miss Hathaway in "The Beverly Hillbillies" television series from 1962 until 1971, died Saturday of cancer of the jaw in Paul Desert, Calif. After a career in journalism, she became a film actress in 1952 and appeared in "Shane," "The Three Faces of Eve," "The Parent Trap" and "Strange Bedfellows."
NEWS
March 24, 1991
Strange bedfellows have teamed up in defense of the First Amendment, which is under attack by equally strange bedfellows. The conservative Rep. Henry J. Hyde, R-Ill., introduced a bill to ban campus codes against ''hate speech.'' Cheering him on was the liberal Nadine Strossen, head of the American Civil Liberties Union.At issue are the ''sensitivity codes'' by which a number of American colleges and universities hope to teach their students basic kindergarten manners. Most of the codes ban racism, sexism and other intolerant ''isms.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Musicians collaborate all the time; so do actors. But artists, not really - and that goes double for street art, where making an individual mark is the name of the game. That's why one of Baltimore's best-known street artists had to try it. The result is a head-turning show called ZimZum, opening Saturday at the Creative Alliance . It features an expansive indoor and outdoor group effort between Baltimore Love Project founder Michael Owen and the artists Gaia and Momo. "Most street artists just want to put their voice up on a wall," Owen says.
NEWS
October 12, 2011
Since a redistricting commission presented its plans for new congressional maps to Gov. Martin O'Malley, two groups have been particularly vocal in their complaints that it dilutes minority votes: African-American and Hispanic Democrats, and Republican elected officials. The first camp includes Rep. Donna Edwards, a Democrat who is angry that she would lose a minority-heavy Montgomery County portion of her district and pick up many white areas in Anne Arundel County instead. The second includes state Sens.
EXPLORE
By Steve Schuster | May 16, 2011
Welcome to the new home of Strange Bedfellows. Please book mark the address of our new blog - http://www.baltimoresun.com/explore/baltimorecounty/news/politics/strange-bedfellows-blog/ We have changed addresses and are on a new blogging platform. We are excited to see what we can do here and are able to do more features and create more interactive content. Stay tuned.
NEWS
By Ruth Faden and Jonathan D. Moreno | May 1, 2009
It's a name only a policy wonk could love: comparative effectiveness research. But get ready to hear a lot about it; it could save your rights as a patient - and maybe even your life. If opponents have their way, it could be the bogeyman that brings down health care reform. Using false and misleading scare tactics, Conservatives for Patients Rights, a group opposed to comprehensive health care reform, announced last week a $1 million ad attacking comparative effectiveness. However, an emerging consensus of strange bedfellows - from insurance companies to the Institute of Medicine to patients rights advocates - all support making a national investment in research to compare the effectiveness of drugs, devices and diagnostic procedures, and sharing the information that results with physicians and patients.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | March 16, 2007
Death penalty stands on ever shakier ground Maybe next time, the phone will ring for Alex X. Mooney and it will be the pope rather than a mere cardinal. Maybe the governor will perform the Irish music live rather than just have it playing in the background in his office when Mooney comes a-calling. Maybe the former lieutenant governor and fellow Republican will linger even longer over dessert the next time he has a three-hour dinner with the state senator from Frederick. In the end, the religious, governmental and party wooing failed to persuade Mooney to support a bill repealing the death penalty in Maryland - his vote against it in committee yesterday effectively killed the measure for this session.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 26, 2005
In an era of aggressive postmodern deconstruction, artworks are as likely to take the form of political and ideological arguments as they are to represent objects of special visual interest. Patriot, the current show at the Contemporary Museum, is long on polemics and short on eye appeal, but because it is all-too-characteristic of a current strand of ambitious art-making, it deserves a careful look. The show purports to examine the phenomenon of nationalism, one of the driving political ideologies of the 19th century.
NEWS
April 3, 2014
All those who feel they must profess their faith before governmental meetings should realize that the rights of other faiths and non-believers are just as important as theirs ( "As Carroll debates prayer, founding fathers' faith comes into focus ," March 29). I think a moment of silence would be sufficient for individuals to call upon whatever force they feel will help them in their decision making. Christians should remember their history. Religion was used politically throughout time for world domination.
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