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SPORTS
September 18, 1991
Tribal Crown set the pace early in yesterday's Straight Face allowance feature at Pimlico and drew off to win in 1 minute, 43 3/5 seconds over 1 1/16 miles on turf.Ridden by leading jockey Michael Luzzi and trained by Virgil "Buddy" Raines, Tribal Crown paid $5.40, $3.80 and $3.40. Chuck Sails, under Marco Casteneda, was second, 2 1/2 lengths back, and paid $3.80 and $2.80. Half Gavvo ran third for $3 with Edgar Prado up. The 1-7 exacta paid $22.20.The double-triple carry-over topped six figures yesterday and will be $110,889.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and other utilities in Maryland will make the case to state regulators Tuesday that customers who don't want smart meters should pay an upfront charge and a monthly fee - anywhere from $15 to $87 - to opt out. Smart-meter opponents are ready to argue that those proposed charges are unreasonably high, considering the costs utilities have borne so far from customers deferring meter installations. "It doesn't pass the straight-face test," said Jonathan D. Libber, president of Maryland Smart Meter Awareness, which opposes the technology.
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NEWS
September 26, 2000
HOLDING A premature election for president of Yugoslavia was President Slobodan Milosevic's idea. He ought to abide by the result. That goes against the grain. He never cared who liked his rule. Repudiation by the people means nothing to him. This election was meant to shut the critics up. Its result was hardly in doubt. Mr. Milosevic harassed the opposition, muzzled the press and blocked observers from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). If he stole the election, who would know?
NEWS
September 25, 2012
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s column about the first anniversary of the Occupy movement betrays a hubris, a willful stupidity, and the usual threadbare deceptions ("Occupy movement got America wrong," Sept. 23). Such are the building blocks of the corrupt edifice that Occupy seeks to dismantle. It is no surprise that a politician of Mr. Ehrlich's stripes would think along these lines, as his administration acted as a tribune for the Walton family. Likewise it is no surprise that Mr. Ehrlich missed the ethical humanism at the core of Occupy.
NEWS
September 25, 2012
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s column about the first anniversary of the Occupy movement betrays a hubris, a willful stupidity, and the usual threadbare deceptions ("Occupy movement got America wrong," Sept. 23). Such are the building blocks of the corrupt edifice that Occupy seeks to dismantle. It is no surprise that a politician of Mr. Ehrlich's stripes would think along these lines, as his administration acted as a tribune for the Walton family. Likewise it is no surprise that Mr. Ehrlich missed the ethical humanism at the core of Occupy.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 24, 2004
THAT MORNING of Jan. 18, 1976, I sat in a dusty city-room corner of the now-departed News American and hit the keyboard of an old Royal typewriter. Marvin Mandel, governor of Maryland back then, was on his way to federal court. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., governor now, was on his way to freshman classes at Princeton. And I was beginning what has become nearly 29 years of writing newspaper columns. A columnist's job is different from a reporter's. A reporter says: Here are the facts. A columnist says: Here are the facts - and here's what I think about them.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | November 9, 1992
Recently I went for my annual physical and was pronounced in reasonably good health, despite having a body that looks like it belongs on an autopsy table.Be that as it may, I'm thinking about shopping around for another physician because of lingering questions about the quality of treatment my present doctor provides.To be honest, I'm not even sure he went to medical school.Oh, he says he went to med school. But they all say that. I used to say it myself back in college to impress women.We'd be hanging out in some bar and one of my buddies would ask if I wanted another beer, and I'd say in a loud voice: "Gee, I don't know.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President-elect Bill Clinton seems to be getting squeezed into contradictory positions by the pressures of staffing his new administration. In his attempt to represent himself as the candidate of change, he may end up playing the conventional politics of constituency groups.On the one hand, Clinton has promised an administration that "looks more like America" -- meaning one with someone other than the usual middle-aged white males who hold most of the influential jobs in any government formed by either party.
NEWS
By Jack Germond and Jules Witcover | May 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In nominating Judge Stephen G. Breyer to the Supreme Court, President Clinton may have chosen another Brandeis or Cardozo, for all we know now. The one thing that is clear, however, is that the president's handling of the whole process has been remarkably inept as a political exercise.The flip side of the choice of Breyer is the rejection of Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt, the one candidate on the list of Clinton finalists who had evoked the most opposition from Republicans in the Senate.
TOPIC
By Kathy Read and Kathy Read,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 4, 2002
For those who appreciate orchestra seats in the theater of the absurd, this is your lucky day. We now have a personal injury lawyer in New York who -- with a straight face -- wants to hold fast-food restaurants accountable for his client's weight and health problems by claiming Big Macs are as addictive as Marlboro's. It would be a laughable situation if it didn't amount to another swipe at two of our most basic liberties: freedom of choice and the constitutional process of making law. Unelected personal injury lawyers have taken it upon themselves to "protect" us innocent consumers from all the evils associated with making our own decisions.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 24, 2004
THAT MORNING of Jan. 18, 1976, I sat in a dusty city-room corner of the now-departed News American and hit the keyboard of an old Royal typewriter. Marvin Mandel, governor of Maryland back then, was on his way to federal court. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., governor now, was on his way to freshman classes at Princeton. And I was beginning what has become nearly 29 years of writing newspaper columns. A columnist's job is different from a reporter's. A reporter says: Here are the facts. A columnist says: Here are the facts - and here's what I think about them.
TOPIC
By Kathy Read and Kathy Read,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 4, 2002
For those who appreciate orchestra seats in the theater of the absurd, this is your lucky day. We now have a personal injury lawyer in New York who -- with a straight face -- wants to hold fast-food restaurants accountable for his client's weight and health problems by claiming Big Macs are as addictive as Marlboro's. It would be a laughable situation if it didn't amount to another swipe at two of our most basic liberties: freedom of choice and the constitutional process of making law. Unelected personal injury lawyers have taken it upon themselves to "protect" us innocent consumers from all the evils associated with making our own decisions.
NEWS
September 26, 2000
HOLDING A premature election for president of Yugoslavia was President Slobodan Milosevic's idea. He ought to abide by the result. That goes against the grain. He never cared who liked his rule. Repudiation by the people means nothing to him. This election was meant to shut the critics up. Its result was hardly in doubt. Mr. Milosevic harassed the opposition, muzzled the press and blocked observers from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). If he stole the election, who would know?
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | February 9, 2000
COLUMBIA, S.C. -- John S. McCain is facing a different kind of political test in the Republican primary here next week. If he passes it, it may show he is well-equipped to go all the way to the presidential nomination. The Arizona senator's stunning success in New Hampshire was based on a schedule of personal campaigning that was unprecedented, even in a state in which face-to-face stumping has always been the first requirement. No one else has ever held 114 town meetings. The result by primary day was that Mr. McCain had become a very special political phenomenon, a happening in himself who evoked an enormous outpouring of support.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1998
In her previous cartoon hometown of Highland, Daria Morgendorffer was forced to share a classroom with MTV's nacho-munching, TV-worshiping, generally anti-social Beavis and Butt-head. The duh duo would often serenade her to the tune of "diarrhea, cha-cha-cha."No wonder she's so cynical."They had a poor schooling system," says Glenn Eichler, co-creative supervisor of MTV's first full-length cartoon, "Daria." Now in its second season, it's one of MTV's highest-rated shows.Daria, a character audiences got to know from sarcastic asides aimed at Beavis and Butt-head, is now the primary character, getting ample chances to demonstrate her droll demeanor.
NEWS
By Jack Germond and Jules Witcover | May 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In nominating Judge Stephen G. Breyer to the Supreme Court, President Clinton may have chosen another Brandeis or Cardozo, for all we know now. The one thing that is clear, however, is that the president's handling of the whole process has been remarkably inept as a political exercise.The flip side of the choice of Breyer is the rejection of Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt, the one candidate on the list of Clinton finalists who had evoked the most opposition from Republicans in the Senate.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | February 9, 2000
COLUMBIA, S.C. -- John S. McCain is facing a different kind of political test in the Republican primary here next week. If he passes it, it may show he is well-equipped to go all the way to the presidential nomination. The Arizona senator's stunning success in New Hampshire was based on a schedule of personal campaigning that was unprecedented, even in a state in which face-to-face stumping has always been the first requirement. No one else has ever held 114 town meetings. The result by primary day was that Mr. McCain had become a very special political phenomenon, a happening in himself who evoked an enormous outpouring of support.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and other utilities in Maryland will make the case to state regulators Tuesday that customers who don't want smart meters should pay an upfront charge and a monthly fee - anywhere from $15 to $87 - to opt out. Smart-meter opponents are ready to argue that those proposed charges are unreasonably high, considering the costs utilities have borne so far from customers deferring meter installations. "It doesn't pass the straight-face test," said Jonathan D. Libber, president of Maryland Smart Meter Awareness, which opposes the technology.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President-elect Bill Clinton seems to be getting squeezed into contradictory positions by the pressures of staffing his new administration. In his attempt to represent himself as the candidate of change, he may end up playing the conventional politics of constituency groups.On the one hand, Clinton has promised an administration that "looks more like America" -- meaning one with someone other than the usual middle-aged white males who hold most of the influential jobs in any government formed by either party.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | November 9, 1992
Recently I went for my annual physical and was pronounced in reasonably good health, despite having a body that looks like it belongs on an autopsy table.Be that as it may, I'm thinking about shopping around for another physician because of lingering questions about the quality of treatment my present doctor provides.To be honest, I'm not even sure he went to medical school.Oh, he says he went to med school. But they all say that. I used to say it myself back in college to impress women.We'd be hanging out in some bar and one of my buddies would ask if I wanted another beer, and I'd say in a loud voice: "Gee, I don't know.
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