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By James G. McCollam and James G. McCollam,Copley News Service | March 31, 1991
Q: We are interested in knowing the value of this violin. It is in very good condition and has a label inside reading "Antonius Stradivarius, Cremonensis, Faciebat Anno 1727."A: According to the experts, all genuine Stradivarius violins have been accounted for. The truth is that almost all violins bearing these labels are factory-made fakes. At the best, they might be worth $150 for those of fine musical quality. Have your violin examined by a professional musician.Q: What does this mark on a Minton jardiniere mean?
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NEWS
May 27, 2008
Marin Alsop could have done a lot with the last $100,000 of her MacArthur Foundation genius grant. See the Seven Wonders of the World. Commission a new symphony. Treat herself to a red Porsche. Put a down payment on a Stradivarius (previously owned). But she's decided to invest in the future audiences of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. That's a gesture worth applauding. As music director of the BSO, Ms. Alsop has taken her role as the city's booster of symphonic music to heart, through appearances in the community, on the radio and with benefactors.
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NEWS
By Sara Lin and Sara Lin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 8, 2004
LOS ANGELES - The theft early last week of a $3.5 million Stradivarius cello owned by the Los Angeles Philharmonic sent a sour note across the classical music world amid fears that a sophisticated ring of bandits had made off with the treasure. Detectives launched an international search for the instrument as aficionados from London to Hong Kong chattered about who might have the cello. But on Thursday, the investigation shifted closer to home. The Los Angeles Police Department released a videotape showing a young man on a bicycle, probably a teen-ager from the neighborhood, making off with the cello.
NEWS
By Sara Lin and Sara Lin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 8, 2004
LOS ANGELES - The theft early last week of a $3.5 million Stradivarius cello owned by the Los Angeles Philharmonic sent a sour note across the classical music world amid fears that a sophisticated ring of bandits had made off with the treasure. Detectives launched an international search for the instrument as aficionados from London to Hong Kong chattered about who might have the cello. But on Thursday, the investigation shifted closer to home. The Los Angeles Police Department released a videotape showing a young man on a bicycle, probably a teen-ager from the neighborhood, making off with the cello.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 1996
HARTFORD, Conn. -- Marcelle Hall thought she had exhausted her 15 minutes of fame in 1987 when she returned a stolen Stradivarius to Lloyd's of London -- a violin that she said her husband told her on his deathbed he had stolen from a Carnegie Hall dressing room in 1936.Hall, 78, said the "whole reward" of returning the violin was "to bring this beautiful instrument back to the world," but did receive a $263,000 finder's fee from Lloyd's. Now, in a case before the Connecticut Supreme Court, Hall's stepdaughter, Sherry Altman Schoenwetter, is seeking a portion of that fee.Schoenwetter, who lives in Buffalo, N.Y., is the daughter of Ms. Hall's late husband, Julian Altman, by a previous marriage and is his only other surviving heir.
NEWS
By Charles Leroux and Charles Leroux,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 12, 1999
CHICAGO -- Like many a mother, Charles Rudig's mom sent him to take piano lessons. Young Charles, however, spent much of his lesson time under the piano staring up at the bottom where he could clearly see the instrument's construction, "the good part," as he puts it.He's still looking inside instruments, now as a consultant for Sotheby's, the auction house. He has come to Chicago to do free appraisals of musical instruments. From a smallish leather case, Rudig produces the tools of his trade -- a tape measure, a slender goose-neck flashlight for illuminating the insides of instruments, several magnifying glasses of varying power -- and places them on a table over which a black cloth has been spread.
FEATURES
By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | February 20, 1994
Q: This picture shows six of 12 plates that I have. Each plate has a different game bird painted in the center and all are in excellent condition. On the back of the plates are the words "Copeland -- Spode -- England."I would appreciate any information you can give me.A: In the late 1800s and early 1900s game plates were very popular. They were used to serve fish or game.These plates were made by W. T. Copeland & Sons Ltd., Staffordshire, England, in the early 1900s. They would be worth about $1,200 to $1,500 for a set of 12.Q: Enclosed is a picture of a chair that we have had since 1950.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 21, 1991
Joshua Bell is looking for a soul mate.You wouldn't think he'd have problems -- he's young, he's famous, he's good-looking, he's got a great personality and he's perhaps the most talented American violinist of his generation.But the companion that Bell's looking for isn't a human being -- it's a violin."You're always looking for the right match for your personality -- it's like getting married," says Bell, who will play Mozart's Violin Concerto No. 3 with the Baltimore Symphony and conductor David Zinman tonight and tomorrow.
FEATURES
By James G. McCollam and James G. McCollam,Copley News Service | August 18, 1991
Q: Enclosed is a picture of a blue and white platter that is 20 inches by 12 inches. Also enclosed is a picture of the mark "Villeroy & Boch, Dresden." Can you tell me something about its origin and value?A: This Blue Onion pattern platter was made by Villeroy & Boch, a company that made all kinds of ceramics in Dresden, Mettlach and seven other cities in Germany. Your platter was made in the late 1800s and would probably sell for about $165 to $185.Q: The attached mark is on the bottom of what I think is a German punch bowl.
FEATURES
By James. G. McCollam and James. G. McCollam,Copley News Service | February 2, 1992
Q: This beautiful soup tureen has a small crack in the lid. It is marked "W.G. Guerin & Co., Limoges, France." When was this made, and how much is it worth?A: This Guerin Limoges tureen was made about 1900 and would sell for $125 to $135 in good condition. It's impossible for me to assess the diminished value due to damage.Q: The enclosed mark is on the bottom of an 8-inch glossy pottery vase decorated with pine cones. Can you identify the maker and estimate its value?A: This mark was used by Roseville Pottery in Ohio during the mid-20th century.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2003
SALT LAKE CITY - Using the bold strokes of a plane and the surgical precision of a finger file, Ryosuke Kanazawa is making beautiful music. Just two weeks ago, the thin sheet of wood before him was a solid slab of maple. By late spring it will be part of a violin, his fourth in two years. At workbenches around him, other apprentices struggle to make chunks of wood resemble the posters on the walls. Stradivari. Guarneri. Amati. Their works are masterpieces. Kanazawa. Hardaker. Larson.
NEWS
By Charles Leroux and Charles Leroux,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 12, 1999
CHICAGO -- Like many a mother, Charles Rudig's mom sent him to take piano lessons. Young Charles, however, spent much of his lesson time under the piano staring up at the bottom where he could clearly see the instrument's construction, "the good part," as he puts it.He's still looking inside instruments, now as a consultant for Sotheby's, the auction house. He has come to Chicago to do free appraisals of musical instruments. From a smallish leather case, Rudig produces the tools of his trade -- a tape measure, a slender goose-neck flashlight for illuminating the insides of instruments, several magnifying glasses of varying power -- and places them on a table over which a black cloth has been spread.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 1996
HARTFORD, Conn. -- Marcelle Hall thought she had exhausted her 15 minutes of fame in 1987 when she returned a stolen Stradivarius to Lloyd's of London -- a violin that she said her husband told her on his deathbed he had stolen from a Carnegie Hall dressing room in 1936.Hall, 78, said the "whole reward" of returning the violin was "to bring this beautiful instrument back to the world," but did receive a $263,000 finder's fee from Lloyd's. Now, in a case before the Connecticut Supreme Court, Hall's stepdaughter, Sherry Altman Schoenwetter, is seeking a portion of that fee.Schoenwetter, who lives in Buffalo, N.Y., is the daughter of Ms. Hall's late husband, Julian Altman, by a previous marriage and is his only other surviving heir.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1996
MINNEAPOLIS -- If the thought that he was a better player than the Orioles' everyday infielders crossed Bill Ripken's mind, then being a bench player and going days between at-bats might be tough.But it would be hard for him to believe that, with Roberto Alomar at second, Cal Ripken at short and B. J. Surhoff at third. "I don't think anybody enjoys not playing," Bill Ripken said yesterday. "But if you look at the whole picture, that makes it a whole lot easier to accept. If you can sit there and say, 'I can understand.
FEATURES
By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | February 20, 1994
Q: This picture shows six of 12 plates that I have. Each plate has a different game bird painted in the center and all are in excellent condition. On the back of the plates are the words "Copeland -- Spode -- England."I would appreciate any information you can give me.A: In the late 1800s and early 1900s game plates were very popular. They were used to serve fish or game.These plates were made by W. T. Copeland & Sons Ltd., Staffordshire, England, in the early 1900s. They would be worth about $1,200 to $1,500 for a set of 12.Q: Enclosed is a picture of a chair that we have had since 1950.
FEATURES
By James. G. McCollam and James. G. McCollam,Copley News Service | February 2, 1992
Q: This beautiful soup tureen has a small crack in the lid. It is marked "W.G. Guerin & Co., Limoges, France." When was this made, and how much is it worth?A: This Guerin Limoges tureen was made about 1900 and would sell for $125 to $135 in good condition. It's impossible for me to assess the diminished value due to damage.Q: The enclosed mark is on the bottom of an 8-inch glossy pottery vase decorated with pine cones. Can you identify the maker and estimate its value?A: This mark was used by Roseville Pottery in Ohio during the mid-20th century.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK CURES: A GAY MAN'S ODYSSEY. Martin Duberman. Dutton. 301 pages. $19.95. and J. WYNN ROUSUCK CURES: A GAY MAN'S ODYSSEY. Martin Duberman. Dutton. 301 pages. $19.95.,LOS ANGELES TIMES THE M.D. Thomas M. Disch. Knopf. 401 pages. $22 | June 23, 1991
ANTONIETTA.John Hersey. Knopf.304 pages. $21. "Antonietta" is John Hersey's 300-year chronicle of a fictitious Stradivarius violin named for the luthier's second wife. Although its five chapters are labeled "acts," they more closely resemble the movements of a musical suite, each composed in a different style.The instrument's creation in 1699 is described in a conventional, third-person narrative -- although little about cantankerous Stradivari seems conventional. Next comes a series of letters by Mozart, whose fancy has been captured by Antonietta and by the female pupil who plays her.The instrument then passes into the hands of a French violinist who delivers a first-person account of his visits to Berlioz; fired up by Antonietta's music, the composer writes the "Symphonie Fantastique."
NEWS
May 27, 2008
Marin Alsop could have done a lot with the last $100,000 of her MacArthur Foundation genius grant. See the Seven Wonders of the World. Commission a new symphony. Treat herself to a red Porsche. Put a down payment on a Stradivarius (previously owned). But she's decided to invest in the future audiences of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. That's a gesture worth applauding. As music director of the BSO, Ms. Alsop has taken her role as the city's booster of symphonic music to heart, through appearances in the community, on the radio and with benefactors.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 21, 1991
Joshua Bell is looking for a soul mate.You wouldn't think he'd have problems -- he's young, he's famous, he's good-looking, he's got a great personality and he's perhaps the most talented American violinist of his generation.But the companion that Bell's looking for isn't a human being -- it's a violin."You're always looking for the right match for your personality -- it's like getting married," says Bell, who will play Mozart's Violin Concerto No. 3 with the Baltimore Symphony and conductor David Zinman tonight and tomorrow.
FEATURES
By James G. McCollam and James G. McCollam,Copley News Service | August 18, 1991
Q: Enclosed is a picture of a blue and white platter that is 20 inches by 12 inches. Also enclosed is a picture of the mark "Villeroy & Boch, Dresden." Can you tell me something about its origin and value?A: This Blue Onion pattern platter was made by Villeroy & Boch, a company that made all kinds of ceramics in Dresden, Mettlach and seven other cities in Germany. Your platter was made in the late 1800s and would probably sell for about $165 to $185.Q: The attached mark is on the bottom of what I think is a German punch bowl.
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