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By Orange County Register | September 30, 1992
Actress Madeleine Stowe has never been shy about speaking her mind when it comes to the roles she has played in films, particularly when the roles didn't turn out as expected.In films such as "Stakeout" and the recent "Unlawful Entry," Ms. Stowe thinks her characters were turned into "Barbie dolls," despite assurances to the contrary from the directors."It was 'Unlawful Entry' that really disturbed me," the actress said. "It was frustrating to see the intelligence yanked out of a picture like that."
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TRAVEL
By Catharine Hamm and Catharine Hamm,Tribune Newspapers | May 24, 2009
Question:: I was on a Southwest flight recently, and the flight attendant said that folks could not put their laptops in the seat-back pocket. Why not? Answer: : Consider the glove box in your car. It was designed to hold the operating manual and maybe the occasional work order for maintenance or repair. It wasn't designed to hold an accordion file of coupons and recipes, two tire gauges (in case one breaks, you know), a bottle of Excedrin, a "break-the-window-if-you're-drowning" hammer, hand lotion, 65,000 napkins and a copy of The Time Traveler's Wife.
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TRAVEL
By Marshall S. Berdan and Marshall S. Berdan,Special to the Sun | November 12, 2006
If charm is what counts most, Stowe, Vt., is New England's premier ski town. Towering over the 200-year-old village is the 171-foot steeple of the white clapboard Community Church built in 1863. A covered bridge spans the local stream, leading up to a coaching inn that dates to the 1830s. Genteelly spaced along Main Street are old country stores and quaint new boutiques and galleries, interspersed with an abundance of mature sugar maples. Completing this quintessential New England scene is the picture postcard backdrop of 4,393-foot Mount Mansfield, Vermont's highest peak, looming in the distance.
TRAVEL
By Marshall S. Berdan and Marshall S. Berdan,Special to the Sun | November 12, 2006
If charm is what counts most, Stowe, Vt., is New England's premier ski town. Towering over the 200-year-old village is the 171-foot steeple of the white clapboard Community Church built in 1863. A covered bridge spans the local stream, leading up to a coaching inn that dates to the 1830s. Genteelly spaced along Main Street are old country stores and quaint new boutiques and galleries, interspersed with an abundance of mature sugar maples. Completing this quintessential New England scene is the picture postcard backdrop of 4,393-foot Mount Mansfield, Vermont's highest peak, looming in the distance.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | July 9, 1995
The continuing controversy over the atomic bombing of Japan that ended World War II is fomented by "revisionists" who ignore the realities of the time, declares a former top aide to the man who ordered it -- President Harry S. Truman.Truman believed the bombings he ordered in August 1945 of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were necessary to save at least 250,000 American lives in an invasion, said David H. Stowe, 84, a Truman aide from 1947 to 1953 and a resident of the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville for the past four years.
SPORTS
December 3, 1991
2/3 TC For the San Francisco 49ers, there's no quarterback question about it -- it's Steve Bono.With a three-game winning streak to his credit and the other Steve still slowed by a bum knee, Bono remains the 49ers' starting quarterback -- at least for another week -- as San Francisco suddenly finds postseason play no longer out of the question."
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | February 24, 2006
BETHESDA -- Uncle Tom got a bum rap. I'm convinced of that after talking to James E. Henson Sr., a retired attorney in suburban Washington, D.C. He ought to know. He's known Uncle Tom as he would know a member of his own family. Mr. Henson, 69, is a direct descendant of Josiah Henson, the escaped slave whose memoir helped Harriet Beecher Stowe write her famous novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin. He's also a descendant of Matthew Henson, the black explorer who accompanied Adm. Robert E. Peary on his historic expedition to the North Pole in 1909.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 22, 2000
"Strong Medicine," a new medical drama starring Janine Turner ("Northern Exposure") and Rosa Blasi ("Noriega: God's Favorite"), is the best series pilot I've ever seen on the Lifetime cable channel. Don't get excited. That's not necessarily as great as it might seem: A) Lifetime has not had much success with regular weekly series. B) A good pilot does not necessarily make for a great series, especially one as dependent on the guest star as this is. The pilot is worth going out of your way to see tomorrow mainly for the performance of Whoopi Goldberg.
NEWS
November 13, 1997
David Henry Stowe Sr., 87, presidential aideDavid Henry Stowe Sr., who had been a presidential aide and labor arbitrator, died of lung cancer Monday at St. Agnes Hospital. He was 87.A Bethesda resident for 50 years, he had lived at the Charlestown retirement community in Catonsville since 1991.He left the North Carolina State Employment Service and went to Washington as chief examiner in the Bureau of the Budget in 1941 and became an aide to President Harry S. Truman several years later.In a 1995 interview in The Sun, he said he often talked to Mr. Truman about the president's decision to drop the first atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, and told of witnessing Mr. Truman's controversial firing of Gen. Douglas MacArthur as Far East commander during the Korean War in 1951.
NEWS
By Mike Burns | September 8, 1996
LABOR DAY having sung the threnody for summer vacations, I find myself thinking repeatedly about mine. Not of sun and surf, mountain trails or historic sites. Not about family picnics, amusement parks or exotic foreign travels. But about my summer reading, books for passing the time relaxing from the daily hustle-bustle.This summer, largely by coincidence, my reading list was limited to American novels published in 1851. Yes, that's 145 years ago -- not the stuff you'll find on the drugstore or airport book racks.
TRAVEL
By JUDI DASH and JUDI DASH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2006
The days of pack-and-go are pretty much over. Nowadays travelers have to make sure their bags weigh the right amount, can fit in a crowded overhead bin and also pass a Transportation Security Administration inspection without blowing a zipper. Creators of luggage and accessories feel their pain and are trying to make it easier and simpler for people on the go. Lighter luggage, multi-tasking bags, organizational aids and tools for helping travelers follow the rules all serve to minimize at least some of the stress of setting out. And if you've never been a fan of the single carry-on bag, the recent news that airlines lost about 30 million bags last year - some temporarily - might change your mind.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | February 24, 2006
BETHESDA -- Uncle Tom got a bum rap. I'm convinced of that after talking to James E. Henson Sr., a retired attorney in suburban Washington, D.C. He ought to know. He's known Uncle Tom as he would know a member of his own family. Mr. Henson, 69, is a direct descendant of Josiah Henson, the escaped slave whose memoir helped Harriet Beecher Stowe write her famous novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin. He's also a descendant of Matthew Henson, the black explorer who accompanied Adm. Robert E. Peary on his historic expedition to the North Pole in 1909.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2005
It's debatable whether President Bush will consent to meet face-to-face with Gold Star Mother Cindy Sheehan, who began a vigil outside of his Crawford, Texas, ranch in early August. Sheehan's son, Army Spec. Casey Sheehan, was killed in Iraq last year, and she has become the focal point of an anti-war movement that has grown increasingly frustrated by the loss of American lives and the president's determination to "stay the course" in that war-torn country. Sheehan wants a few minutes of the president's time to talk about the war that took her son and is becoming, according to recent polls, increasingly unpopular with the American public.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 12, 2003
ENTEBBE, Uganda - Secret Service agents detained an unidentified man who had stowed away on the airplane carrying members of the news media on President Bush's trip yesterday from South Africa to Uganda. The unarmed man was detained in a press working area near where Bush was touring an AIDS clinic and giving an outdoor speech in Entebbe. "He was never a threat to the president," said Secret Service Agent Mark Sullivan. "He was never near the president." Agents said the man, whose identity and nationality weren't known, mixed in yesterday morning with news media representatives at their hotel in Pretoria, South Africa, boarded the press plane undetected, flew to Entebbe and rode press buses to the media filing center on the shore of Lake Victoria.
BUSINESS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 16, 2003
When the inherited furniture from Grandma arrives or the kids announce they're moving back home, more people are looking beyond their attics and basements for a place to store those cumbersome but cherished possessions. Today, there are about 30,000 self-storage facilities in the United States and seemingly more are built every day. The growth has concerned some industry experts, who worry that the market is saturated. But some center owners say there is plenty of business, propelled by people whose homes don't have enough storage space.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN OUTDOORS WRITER | February 4, 2001
JEFFERSONVILLE, Vt. - The time at the tone, 1776. Temperature, 17. That's the way it is at the Primitive Biathlon, where men wear dead animals on their heads and the unofficial motto is: "Things Ain't What They Used To Be." Out here, just miles from the upper-crust Stowe ski resort, with its massive SUVs and people in the latest Gore-Tex garb, are 170 people lost in time. "You look like you just crossed the Delaware," shouts one spectator to biathlete David Lawrence, who, in his tri-corner hat and waistcoat, looks like he shared an oar with the father of our country.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2001
The good news on the manufacturing front for the coming year is that most of the bad news has already arrived. On the downside, economists say they don't expect much growth in the sector in 2001. "From Maryland's perspective, their bad news is over," said Margaret Murphy, vice president of the Baltimore branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, Va. "They were an early loser for the old industrial base." The number of manufacturing jobs in the state declined 14.5 percent, from 207,000 in 1989 to nearly 177,000 a decade later in 1999 as companies closed plants, put in new technologies to raise productivity and reduced their work forces.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2001
The good news on the manufacturing front for the coming year is that most of the bad news has already arrived. On the downside, economists say they don't expect much growth in the sector in 2001. "From Maryland's perspective, their bad news is over," said Margaret Murphy, vice president of the Baltimore branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, Va. "They were an early loser for the old industrial base." The number of manufacturing jobs in the state declined 14.5 percent, from 207,000 in 1989 to nearly 177,000 a decade later in 1999 as companies closed plants, put in new technologies to raise productivity and reduced their work forces.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 22, 2000
"Strong Medicine," a new medical drama starring Janine Turner ("Northern Exposure") and Rosa Blasi ("Noriega: God's Favorite"), is the best series pilot I've ever seen on the Lifetime cable channel. Don't get excited. That's not necessarily as great as it might seem: A) Lifetime has not had much success with regular weekly series. B) A good pilot does not necessarily make for a great series, especially one as dependent on the guest star as this is. The pilot is worth going out of your way to see tomorrow mainly for the performance of Whoopi Goldberg.
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