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NEWS
February 2, 1991
Stowaways hiding in a ship's rudder cavity provided a surprise for New York's harbor police recently and illustrated some of the new difficulties for the illegal drug-importing business.The pattern is clear. During times when drug importers had unrestricted access to South Florida's shores, "cocaine cowboys" fought street battles for control of a burgeoning market. Marijuana and cocaine streamed in from Latin American countries in private planes and on commercial flights. But the open lawlessness was met by tough new intra-agency strike forces, tighter coastal patrols, aerial surveillance and police penetration of narcotic rings.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
While researching a column about the venerable 172-year-old whaling vessel Charles W. Morgan that was recently relaunched at Mystic Seaport in Connecticut after a restoration, I came upon a 1979 article in a yellowing Baltimore Sun library clip written by Jim Holechek, a retired Baltimore public relations executive and author. Jim, who wrote the "Boating" column in The Sunday Sun for years, told the tale of Joseph Gordon, who later was director of health information for the city Health Department and earned a footnote in maritime history as the Morgan's last stowaway.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 9, 1994
BOSTON -- Eleven Romanian stowaways followed each step of the plan that some of their compatriots used in April: They sealed themselves inside the same kind of metal container, crossed the Atlantic aboard the same cargo ship and broke out midway through the voyage with the same kind of tools.And, like the earlier stowaways, they met the same fate when the ship arrived in Boston yesterday: They were taken into custody by agents of the Immigration and Naturalization Service.Longshoremen cheered the stowaways as they were led in shackles down the gangplank of the Innovation, a 43,000-ton freighter that docked at the Conley Terminal in South Boston.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2011
Wait, frisking 6-year-old girls and making wheelchair-bound grandmothers take off their adult diapers isn't the best way to keep airlines safe? How about deciding not to search suspected terrorists? That's not smart either? Who knew?  The Transportation Security Administration's absurd policy of random pat-downs was made to look silly once again today. CNN is reporting that a man somehow flew cross-country with a fraudulent boarding pass and without a valid ID. When FBI agents arrested Olajide Oluwaseun Noibi, they found he had a boarding pass for a different day with someone else's name on it. It was the flight crew who initially discovered Noibi's deceit, after other passangers complained about his smell.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1995
Fourteen stowaways found aboard a sugar boat bound for Baltimore hid for three days in raw sugar bins, eating small amounts of food they had stashed with them and having no idea where the ship would dock.The stowaways -- males, ranging from 14 to 28 -- fled the Dominican Republic and were discovered Tuesday, three days into the trip, by the ship's crew, according to federal immigration officials who boarded the ship when it docked that night.The stowaways were being detained yesterday on the ship, docked at the Domino Sugar plant in Locust Point.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 6, 2006
SEATTLE -- Twenty-two Chinese stowaways were caught early yesterday entering the United States in a shipping container. The 40-foot container was flagged for inspection, and the people hiding inside would have been found even if they hadn't been caught early yesterday by port of Seattle security, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials. The Rotterdam, a container ship that left Hong Kong on March 19, later arrived in Shanghai, where the container carrying 18 men and four women was loaded on board, said CBP spokesman Mike Milne.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | July 16, 1996
Federal agents found evidence of stowaways last night in a ship that arrived in Baltimore from the port of Le Havre, France, in what they believe is part of a smuggling ring that is using this city as its destination point.Agents from the Immigration and Naturalization Service and the U.S. Customs Service targeted the MSC Rita, which is docked at Dundalk Marine Terminal, because it fit the profile of three ships in which stowaways or evidence of stowaways have been found in the past month, said Stephen Fickett, deputy director of the INS Baltimore District.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1996
Federal agents working to thwart a highly organized smuggling ring will board a ship expected in Baltimore today to search for stowaways.An official from Mediterranean Shipping Co. confirmed that a ship from Le Havre, France, the MSC Samia, will arrive today at Dundalk Marine Terminal. Since April, five ships have arrived in Baltimore from the French port with stowaways aboard, or evidence that they had been in boxcar-sized containers that held bottles of Evian water.The first evidence of stowaways aboard ships from Le Havre was discovered in April, said Benedict J. Ferro, U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service district director.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | May 7, 1991
Due to an editing error, a story in the first two editions of yesterday's Evening Sun said five stowaways aboard a freighter in Chesapeake Bay became violent when they learned they were going to be turned over to authorities.Actually, it was their attempts to escape confinement aboard the ship that prompted the captain to ask the Coast Guard to arrest the stowaways, according to federal officials and witnesses.Five stowaways were in federal custody today awaiting return to their native Dominican Republic after they were arrested aboard a freighter in Chesapeake Bay.The men, who boarded the 554-foot Maritime Lapis while it was berthed in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic, were discovered a few days ago and were locked in a cabin by crew members, authorities said.
NEWS
By John H. Gormley Jr. James Bock of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | September 12, 1991
The four stowaways from the Dominican Republic who were saved from drowning in the Chesapeake Bay in a dramatic rescue Tuesday morning have all agreed to return home and may fly back as early as tomorrow, the head of the Norfolk, Va., office of the Immigration and Naturalization Service said yesterday.The INS official, William W. Bittner, said the four men had all signed "voluntary departure" forms in which they admitted to entering the country illegally and agreed to leave as soon as transportation could be arranged.
NEWS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2010
Name: StowAway Bags What it is: Lightweight — OK, featherweight — nylon bags that weigh less than a pound and can fold neatly into a zippered pouch that comes with each bag. How it works: The bags come folded flat in an 11-by-9-inch carrying case but can expand to hold enough clothing and gear for a weekend getaway or even a weeklong vacation. The bags are available in sizes medium (15 inches by 20 inches) and large (18 inches by 24 inches). They are waterproof and wrinkle-resistant, too. The good: The bags hold a lot of gear and make a perfect carry-on.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 6, 2006
SEATTLE -- Twenty-two Chinese stowaways were caught early yesterday entering the United States in a shipping container. The 40-foot container was flagged for inspection, and the people hiding inside would have been found even if they hadn't been caught early yesterday by port of Seattle security, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials. The Rotterdam, a container ship that left Hong Kong on March 19, later arrived in Shanghai, where the container carrying 18 men and four women was loaded on board, said CBP spokesman Mike Milne.
NEWS
By SEATTLE TIMES | January 4, 2000
SEATTLE -- For more than two weeks, 12 Chinese men sat and slept crammed together in a 40-by-8-foot metal cargo container aboard a ship named the Faith. Their journey ended early Sunday when the Immigration and Naturalization Service, acting on a tip, met the Faith as it docked at Harbor Island in Seattle. Authorities took into custody the 12 men, all tired but apparently in good health, and three others the INS said were their smugglers, who were paid tens of thousands of dollars per immigrant.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | October 7, 1999
LET ME admit upfront that I am one of those people who spends every moment on an airline flight convinced the plane is about to drop out of the sky and slam into the ground like a lawn dart.So the story of that 12-year-old boy who sneaked on a flight to St. Louis didn't do much for my nerves.Maybe you heard about this little monster.The short version goes like this: The kid got in trouble at his Fairfax, Va., elementary school and was sent to see the principal.But instead of going to face the heat, he did what any kid would do in that situation: He freaked out and hopped a train to Reagan Airport in Washington.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1999
Five stowaways on a merchant ship, who spent two weeks inside a steel container lashed to the deck, were captured yesterday at the South Locust Point Marine Terminal, where they emerged thinking they had arrived in New York City.One of the stowaways broke a leg and suffered internal injuries when he jumped off a stack of cargo containers. He was listed in critical condition at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore.All five stowaways were from Ecuador, where they climbed inside the empty 40-foot steel box on a pier at the port of Guayaquil sometime in early June, federal officials said.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1999
Workers unloading bananas at a Jessup wholesaler made a shocking discovery yesterday: the body of a 35-year-old South American man who died during a weeklong effort to sneak into the United States by traveling with the fruit shipment.That wasn't the only surprise. When authorities untangled the body from the bananas, they found six kilograms of cocaine, officials said.Why and how the man stowed away on a ship in Colombia is a mystery, as are the drugs. South American cocaine is often hidden in ship cargo bound for the United States, or sent with couriers.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1996
In the past week, U.S. immigration agents have discovered seven stowaways from Eastern Europe and Russia holed up in steel containers aboard two ships bound for Baltimore from one of the world's most notorious ports -- Le Havre in France.The stowaways were found in fine shape, despite the long trans-Atlantic journeys in the darkness of the boxcar-sized shipping containers.The seven men brought enough food for the voyage, and they had plenty of water.They hid in containers filled with bottles of Evian water.
NEWS
By SEATTLE TIMES | January 4, 2000
SEATTLE -- For more than two weeks, 12 Chinese men sat and slept crammed together in a 40-by-8-foot metal cargo container aboard a ship named the Faith. Their journey ended early Sunday when the Immigration and Naturalization Service, acting on a tip, met the Faith as it docked at Harbor Island in Seattle. Authorities took into custody the 12 men, all tired but apparently in good health, and three others the INS said were their smugglers, who were paid tens of thousands of dollars per immigrant.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1996
Federal agents working to thwart a highly organized smuggling ring will board a ship expected in Baltimore today to search for stowaways.An official from Mediterranean Shipping Co. confirmed that a ship from Le Havre, France, the MSC Samia, will arrive today at Dundalk Marine Terminal. Since April, five ships have arrived in Baltimore from the French port with stowaways aboard, or evidence that they had been in boxcar-sized containers that held bottles of Evian water.The first evidence of stowaways aboard ships from Le Havre was discovered in April, said Benedict J. Ferro, U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service district director.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | July 16, 1996
Federal agents found evidence of stowaways last night in a ship that arrived in Baltimore from the port of Le Havre, France, in what they believe is part of a smuggling ring that is using this city as its destination point.Agents from the Immigration and Naturalization Service and the U.S. Customs Service targeted the MSC Rita, which is docked at Dundalk Marine Terminal, because it fit the profile of three ships in which stowaways or evidence of stowaways have been found in the past month, said Stephen Fickett, deputy director of the INS Baltimore District.
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