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By ROB KASPER | September 21, 2002
LAST WEEKEND in a rite of the season, I struggled with storm windows. I tuned the transistor radio to the Ravens game, grabbed a stepladder and tried to tap a ton of patience. It was a little early in the home maintenance cycle to wrestle with storm windows. But I have become so desperate for cool, wet weather, that I am trying tricks, like starting the fall chores early, to hurry autumn's arrival. Things did not go smoothly with the windows or the Ravens. Glass cracked. Nerves frayed.
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FEATURES
The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
It is plenty hot out, but the Farmers' Almanac is predicting a frigid winter with lots of snow. After several mild winters, I am not ready for this. What should I be gathering to prepare? The Red Cross and FEMA have some advice for you. First, make sure you can find your snow shovel! Then get a couple of bags of sand or other EPA-approved material - one for the steps and one for your car - to improve traction. Also, pack an emergency kit for your car that includes a shovel, windshield scraper and small broom, a flashlight, a battery-powered radio, extra batteries, water, snacks, matches, hats, socks and mittens, first-aid kit, blankets, booster cables, emergency flares and a fluorescent distress flag.
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BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | October 21, 2007
If you've been considering making your home more energy-efficient, now is the time to act. Not only will "greening" your home help you save on heating bills this winter and reduce your environmental imprint, but it can also cut your tax bill. In an effort to combat growing energy problems, Congress passed the Energy Policy Act in August 2005. The law offers a tax credit to consumers making specific energy-efficient upgrades to their homes. These upgrades include everything from installing insulation to weatherproofing your doors and windows and investing in approved energy-efficient appliances.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 24, 2008
When the Johns Hopkins undergraduates start disappearing from the blocks around my Charles Village home, the Baltimore summer is around the corner. I miss these kids, but there's something relieving about the neighborhood intermission their departure brings. Friends of mine tell me it encourages the locals to show their faces. For me, the Baltimore summer vacation season begins when my lone surviving rosebush blooms. I put it in nearly 30 years ago. The variety is a Queen Elizabeth.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | November 12, 1994
Some people found the mid-term elections scary, but we know something that will strike terror in every heart: Winter is just around the corner.Remember the ice, snow, slush, sleet and days of temperatures below freezing? Our memories are so vivid that Randy has yet to remove the tire chains from the bed of his truck. It's time to take precautions, to gird yourself for the coming onslaught of nasty weather.One of the most hair-raising things about last winter may have been the utility bills.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | October 11, 1998
FALL WEATHER can be such a tease -- hot and muggy one day, cold and rainy the next, glorious sunshine on yet another. The little reprieves, however, are an excellent time to check out your house for places where precious heat may escape when cold weather does arrive.Here are some tips from the U.S. Department of Energy on tracking down those energy-wasters:* On a windy day, light a stick of incense and hold it next to doors, windows, electrical boxes, ceiling fixtures, electrical outlets and attic hatches -- any place there is a potential air leak.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts | November 2, 1990
When officials at the Walters Art Gallery were planning to convert the Hackerman House on Mount Vernon Place to a museum for Asian arts, they got specific approval from the city to repaint the exterior brick walls that former owner Harry Gladding stripped bare in the early 1960s.They also got specific approval to build a multilevel connection between the house and the 1904 gallery at Charles and Centre streets.What they didn't get approved specifically is the exact tint of the storm windows installed on the outside of the 1850 landmark.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 24, 2008
When the Johns Hopkins undergraduates start disappearing from the blocks around my Charles Village home, the Baltimore summer is around the corner. I miss these kids, but there's something relieving about the neighborhood intermission their departure brings. Friends of mine tell me it encourages the locals to show their faces. For me, the Baltimore summer vacation season begins when my lone surviving rosebush blooms. I put it in nearly 30 years ago. The variety is a Queen Elizabeth.
FEATURES
The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
It is plenty hot out, but the Farmers' Almanac is predicting a frigid winter with lots of snow. After several mild winters, I am not ready for this. What should I be gathering to prepare? The Red Cross and FEMA have some advice for you. First, make sure you can find your snow shovel! Then get a couple of bags of sand or other EPA-approved material - one for the steps and one for your car - to improve traction. Also, pack an emergency kit for your car that includes a shovel, windshield scraper and small broom, a flashlight, a battery-powered radio, extra batteries, water, snacks, matches, hats, socks and mittens, first-aid kit, blankets, booster cables, emergency flares and a fluorescent distress flag.
FEATURES
By Jean Thompson | September 22, 1990
Home improvements can make dollars and sense. That's the moral of a story told by real estate appraiser Greg Glover, whose clients are in Frederick, Howard, Carroll and Upper Montgomery counties.In a community where houses go for $280,000, he appraised one that was near-perfect, he says. Only rotting wooden shutters marred the picture-book appearance. The owner didn't seem to mind, and didn't want to replace them. Buyers, however, didn't warm up to the house; it eventually sold for about $250,000.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | October 21, 2007
If you've been considering making your home more energy-efficient, now is the time to act. Not only will "greening" your home help you save on heating bills this winter and reduce your environmental imprint, but it can also cut your tax bill. In an effort to combat growing energy problems, Congress passed the Energy Policy Act in August 2005. The law offers a tax credit to consumers making specific energy-efficient upgrades to their homes. These upgrades include everything from installing insulation to weatherproofing your doors and windows and investing in approved energy-efficient appliances.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | September 21, 2002
LAST WEEKEND in a rite of the season, I struggled with storm windows. I tuned the transistor radio to the Ravens game, grabbed a stepladder and tried to tap a ton of patience. It was a little early in the home maintenance cycle to wrestle with storm windows. But I have become so desperate for cool, wet weather, that I am trying tricks, like starting the fall chores early, to hurry autumn's arrival. Things did not go smoothly with the windows or the Ravens. Glass cracked. Nerves frayed.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | March 12, 2000
YOU'VE FINALLY found it -- your dream house in the city. Now what will you do with it? First decide if you want to renovate or restore. The latter can be more expensive, especially if your chosen urban homestead is more than 100 years old and missing much of its original trim, mantels, and sash weights, as well as having a leaky roof and a dirt-floor basement. Most people choose renovation, arranging the space in the house to suit their lifestyle, and sometimes their whim. How much you do will be determined by your budget.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | November 8, 1998
NOW THAT we have had a few chilly nights, people who have old wood windows have most likely been reminded of how inefficient they are at keeping out the cold.Windows are the biggest source of heat loss in the winter, especially old ones. So what can you do to minimize the loss and keep that cold air outside?If you want to keep your old windows, for historic preservation or other reasons, your options are limited. You can add some weatherstripping, but you have to be careful not to use too much, or the window will not close properly and that will make the problem worse.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | October 11, 1998
FALL WEATHER can be such a tease -- hot and muggy one day, cold and rainy the next, glorious sunshine on yet another. The little reprieves, however, are an excellent time to check out your house for places where precious heat may escape when cold weather does arrive.Here are some tips from the U.S. Department of Energy on tracking down those energy-wasters:* On a windy day, light a stick of incense and hold it next to doors, windows, electrical boxes, ceiling fixtures, electrical outlets and attic hatches -- any place there is a potential air leak.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 30, 1998
WHEN THE SCREEN door goes in, outdoor living begins. At our house, that happened last weekend. This was a little later in the year than usual. But with this spring's mean-spirited weather -- too much rain followed by too little -- I was reluctant to start the screen-door season.I kept waiting for a sign that nature had calmed down, that it was safe to take down some of the barriers, to invite the breeze into our home. Three days of relative calm convinced me that the time had come to remove the panel of thick, protective glass from the back door and replace it with a panel of airy, welcoming screen.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | October 15, 1990
THE PHONE started ringing during dinner and over the next two hours, eight people would call asking for money.The first caller said: ''Have you thought about storm windows for your home?'' I'm thinking about roast beef for my stomach right now, I said. Maybe some mashed potatoes, too. And a garden salad with Bleu cheese dressing.In fact, I said, there's a very similar meal on the table in front of me -- which the flies happen to be fighting over even as we speak.Two minutes after I hung up with Mr. Storm Windows, the phone rang again and the second caller said: ''Sir, this is the Red Cross.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | October 10, 1992
Frost is starting to show up in what weather forecasters call "the outlying suburbs" and it's starting to become a temptation to break our vow about not turning on the heat before Thanksgiving.As in years past, we may succumb early. Meanwhile, there are a lot of ways to conserve heat built up during the day and keep colder night air out. If you begin fine-tuning your winter-warming system now, you'll be ready for that first cold snap -- or truly thankful at Thanksgiving.Here's a list of tactics that will abet winter warmth:*If it sounds elementary, it is: Close or install storm windows.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | November 12, 1994
Some people found the mid-term elections scary, but we know something that will strike terror in every heart: Winter is just around the corner.Remember the ice, snow, slush, sleet and days of temperatures below freezing? Our memories are so vivid that Randy has yet to remove the tire chains from the bed of his truck. It's time to take precautions, to gird yourself for the coming onslaught of nasty weather.One of the most hair-raising things about last winter may have been the utility bills.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | October 10, 1992
Frost is starting to show up in what weather forecasters call "the outlying suburbs" and it's starting to become a temptation to break our vow about not turning on the heat before Thanksgiving.As in years past, we may succumb early. Meanwhile, there are a lot of ways to conserve heat built up during the day and keep colder night air out. If you begin fine-tuning your winter-warming system now, you'll be ready for that first cold snap -- or truly thankful at Thanksgiving.Here's a list of tactics that will abet winter warmth:*If it sounds elementary, it is: Close or install storm windows.
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