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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 3, 2003
Heavy rain over the holiday weekend caused three storm water overflows in Howard County on Memorial Day, public works officials said. About 15,500 gallons of storm-water overflow contaminated with raw sewage entered the Patuxent River at the North Laurel sewage pump station on U.S. 1 on May 26, said Bob Beringer, chief of the Department of Public Works' Bureau of Utilities. The overflow was reported at 6:30 a.m. and ceased about 1:30 p.m., he said. The station continued to experience heavy flows for hours after the river level receded, however.
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BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
The concrete oozed rather than poured out of the mixer truck, almost as if reluctant to cover the ground - partly because it won't, entirely. Laborers shoveled pebbly gobs around to form a new sidewalk at a park-and-ride lot in Waysons Corner, one of two where the State Highway Administration is laying "pervious" concrete this summer as a test of its environmental friendliness. Porous paving surfaces have been around for decades, but they're expensive and often didn't work well.
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NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | August 25, 1991
Despite earlier attempts by a local developer to solve the problem, a Hampstead community is plagued with a storm water management dilemma.Residents of Small Crossings are concerned about a drainage area that has become an eyesore in the development at Fairmount and Upper Beckleysville roads.Residents are especially concerned that the homeowners association may be responsible if any nearby houses -- not located in the development -- are damaged."We are trying to get some help in regards to the problem we are having with our storm water management drain inSmall Crossings," said Steve Harmon, president of the homeowners group.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
State and federal officials joined a Chesapeake Bay nonprofit Thursday in announcing the award of more than $3.7 million to 34 organizations to reduce storm-water pollution in Maryland and three neighboring states and the District of Columbia. Nine of the grants totaling more than $1 million went toward planting trees, removing pavement and other greening projects in Baltimore city, while two smaller grants targeted plantings in Baltimore County. Shawn Garvin, Mid-Atlantic regional administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency, whose agency provided some of the funds, said investing in such "green infrastructure" to soak up rainfall is "critically important to restoring local waters and the Chesapeake Bay. " Storm-water runoff is a significant and growing source of pollution fouling the bay, but controlling it in dense, older communities is challenging and costly.
NEWS
August 11, 2001
THE GOALS were put forth 39 years ago: reduce the nation's water-polluting discharges to zero and make waterways clean enough for swimming and fishing. We haven't come close to meeting those ambitious targets, contained in the Clean Water Act of 1972. But the debate taking place among members of the Anne Arundel County Council right now provides one example of the progress since the days when little attention was paid to the harm that development can do to streams, rivers and oceans - and estuaries like our Chesapeake Bay. The Arundel council is debating the degree to which commercial property owners must reduce storm runoff - especially from asphalt parking lots and rooftops - if they decide to redevelop their property.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | March 3, 2010
Environmental advocates, stream restoration experts and local officials urged state lawmakers Tuesday to require all jurisdictions to charge property owners a fee to deal with the Chesapeake Bay's growing problem - pollution washing off lawns, driveways, buildings and parking lots. Members of the Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee heard opposing views on legislation requiring a "storm-water remediation fee" for every city, county and town. Polluted runoff from urban and suburban lands is a significant and growing source of pollution fouling the Chesapeake Bay, advocates noted.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | September 24, 1993
The State Highway Administration plans to begin rebuilding the natural stream banks of the Jabez Branch next summer in an effort to restore the only natural trout stream in Maryland's coastal plane.But Robert A. Bachman, director of the Fish, Heritage and Wildlife Administration with the Department of Natural Resources, said more needs to be done if the stream is to be saved. He said surges of warm storm-water runoff continue to threaten the trout that spawn and live in the Jabez Branch, a shallow Severn River tributary running through Gambrills and Severn.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 6, 2005
Fees will be reduced in Carroll County for small developers who incorporate grassy swales, shoulders and other techniques to capture storm water - rather than relying on ponds that the county must maintain. The change was approved yesterday by the county commissioners and means a savings of at least $500 for developers of three or fewer lots, said Martin B. Covington III, storm-water program engineer for the county Bureau of Resource Management. The permitted measures include the use of grassy swales, reduced slopes and grass shoulders along small subdivision roads.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | April 1, 1992
A 95-home development that received final approval from the Planningand Zoning Commission Monday night will send more cars onto an already congested Route 30, the State Highway Administration said.But the state told the town in a letter that because Shiloh Run wouldn't empty directly onto any state highways, it's up to the town to say yes or no to the developer.On Monday, the town said yes."This is the United States of America," Commission Chairman and Councilman Arthur C. Moler said. "Everybody has a right to buy and own a home.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Staff Writer | November 3, 1993
A county administrative hearing officer has rejected a Brooklyn Park sand and gravel company's request to start mining unused acres of its property.In a decision dated Oct. 25, Hearing Officer Robert C. Wilcox said Belle Grove Corp. could not ensure that its storm drainage system was sufficient to prevent water runoff from flowing out of the company's sediment pond and onto residential streets in nearby Pumphrey.Belle Grove owns a 50.4-acre parcel along the north side of Hammonds Lane.The bulk of the property has been used as a sand and gravel operation, but 16.9 acres remain unmined.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | December 24, 2013
Baltimore city , Baltimore County and Prince George's County have been directed by the state to step up their efforts to reduce polluted runoff fouling local streams and the Chesapeake Bay. But environmental groups contend the mandates are too vague and weak, raising the possibility they may go to court to challenge them. The Maryland Department of the Environment ordered the three large jurisdictions to take a variety of similar actions over the next five years to curtail storm-water pollution, including reducing litter in water ways and retrofitting 20 percent of their streets, parking lots and buildings to catch or treat runoff.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 26, 2013
A Baltimore area local government and an environmental group are offering financial help to churches and other nonprofits facing stiff fees for the polluted runoff their properties generate. Howard County Executive Ken Ulman was to sign a storm-water "partnership agreement" Tuesday morning with Bethel Korean Presbyterian Church. Under it, the county will give the Ellicott City religious institution a $145,000 grant to install three "bioretention" areas to capture rainfall running off its parking lots.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 24, 2013
Environmental groups scored a win last week in their lawsuit contending that Montgomery County's state-mandated plan for curbing polluted runoff is lacking. Montgomery Circuit Court Judge Ronald B. Rubin ordered the Maryland Department of the Environment on Wednesday to revisit the storm-water permit it had issued the county in 2010 requiring reductions in pollution and trash from county streets, parking lots and existing buildings. Environmentalists had challenged the permit , arguing that it violated the Clean Water Act by failing to specify reductions needed in harmful discharges of nutrients, sediment and bacteria into the county's rivers and streams.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | November 14, 2013
Tuesday night's County Council Meeting in Bel Air regarding Bill 13-38 was quite interesting, informative and very important. This issue [the storm water fee] , which revolves around the EPA's efforts to decrease pollution going into the Chesapeake Bay via our local waterways, is one we all have to come to terms with - eventually. How the government (local and state) as well as how Harford County citizens arrive at a productive solution requires work, legislatively, administratively and manually (a lot of job creation can result from these efforts)
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 26, 2013
A leading legislator expects a "very strong push" to repeal Maryland's storm-water fee law when lawmakers return to Annapolis in January, but vows to fight any rollback. Del. Maggie McIntosh , who chairs the House Environmental Matters Committee, told attendees at a "storm-water summit" in Baltimore Wednesday that she expects another effort to negate the 2012 law requiring the city and Maryland's nine largest counties to raise funds for controlling runoff pollution from their communities.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 20, 2013
Scientists and others engaged in protecting Maryland's rivers and streams are rising to the defense of the state's storm-water management laws in the wake of Harford County Executive David Craig 's call for their repeal. Craig, a leading Republican candidate for governor in next year's election, said earlier this week that he would push for repeal of at least three state environmental laws, including one requiring property owners in Baltimore City and the state's nine largest counties to pay a fee for reducing storm-water runoff in their communities.
NEWS
January 26, 2010
In your editorial on the new storm water mandates ("Storm over storm water," Jan. 26), you say that "redevelopment efforts won't be affected immediately because existing projects are exempted under a grandfather clause." Unfortunately, that is inaccurate. Projects that are "in the pipeline" are not grandfathered. As anyone in the development community or local government can tell you, the only projects which are exempt from the new requirements are those which have already received final approvals -- which typically are obtained right before construction starts.
NEWS
January 28, 2010
As a land developer in Baltimore County, I disagree with your view of the state's pending storm water regulations completely ("Storm over storm water," Jan. 26). The single-family home subdivisions that I am building contribute minutely to the problems of the Chesapeake Bay. My projects all have stormwater facilities that catch and clean water. You are missing the elephant in the room with us! How about all of the old projects that don't have any facilities and the runoff then dumps directly into the Chesapeake Bay?
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
— Anne Arundel County Executive Laura A. Neuman and the head of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation sparred Tuesday over the storm water fees enacted this year on homeowners and businesses in Maryland's most populous localities. Testifying at a Senate subcommittee hearing presided over by Sen. Ben Cardin, Neuman reiterated her opposition to the state-mandated fee, which she and other critics deride as a "rain tax. " The storm water fee requirement imposed by state lawmakers on Baltimore and the state's nine largest counties generated substantial debate this spring, as all faced a July 1 deadline for imposing some kind of charge on property owners to cover costs of reducing polluted runoff.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | July 1, 2013
  There's been a lot of news lately - and debate - about new storm-water fees being charged most Baltimore area homeowners.  Critics have lambasted them as a "rain tax. "  City residents have wondered why the fees they'll have to pay are so much higher than their suburban counterparts. The answer, at least in part, is that urban streams like Baltimore's have been so squeezed, channelized and degraded by development that they lack the ability of more natural streams to absorb and remove at least some of the pollution fouling their waters.
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