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By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
More than 10,000 homes in the metro Baltimore region -- valued at a total of $3.5 billion -- are at risk for potential storm-surge damage, according to housing market analysis firm  CoreLogic.  "Hurricane-driven storm-surge flooding can cause significant property damage when high winds and low pressure causes water to amass inside the storm, releasing a powerful rush over land when the hurricane moves on shore," said CoreLogic, which made...
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Tim Wheeler | September 15, 2014
Baltimore and Annapolis are likely to suffer serious coastal flooding again before this century is over, and people and property in Ocean City and on the lower Eastern Shore face even greater risks as climate change accelerates sea level rise along Maryland's extensive shoreline, warns a new report. Drawing on new government data and projections, Climate Centra l, a nonprofit research and information group, calculates that 41,000 homes with 55,000 residents in the state are in danger under mid-range sea-level rise projections if storm-driven flooding surges five feet above the high tide line - which it did in the Baltimore area and elsewhere during Tropical Storm Isabel in 2003.
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By Peter Hermann and Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2011
The storm surge didn't come, so Rob and Paula Notrica went ahead with their wedding reception Sunday. It didn't matter that guests dressed in their finest had to skirt sandbags to get into the Fells Point restaurant. It didn't matter that relatives had begged them to postpone as dire warnings mounted. It didn't even matter that the frantic week before the nuptials had been accompanied by an earthquake. "We almost had a disaster, but it turned out perfect," said 33-year-old Paula Notrica, a psychiatric therapist who lives in Pikesville.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
A developing El Nino is forecast to suppress tropical storms and hurricanes this summer and fall, contributing to a below-normal storm season, U.S. forecasters said Thursday. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts eight to 13 tropical storms will develop in the Atlantic this year, three to six of which will become hurricanes. One or two of those could intensify into what are considered "major" hurricanes. Forecasters urged preparation despite the predictions of a below-average season, citing seasons like 1992, which came at the tail end of an El Nino and brought devastation to Florida with Hurricane Andrew.
NEWS
By William Thompson and Frank Langfitt and William Thompson and Frank Langfitt,Staff Writers Staff writer Gregory P. Kane contributed to this article | September 1, 1993
OCEAN CITY -- With fears of flooding and high winds, resort officials urged the evacuation of about 125,000 visitors and residents from Ocean City yesterday as the threat of Hurricane Emily disrupted the last full week of the vacation season.Whether the evacuation will prove necessary remained uncertain. At midnight, the National Hurricane Center projected that Emily's center would pass about 100 miles east of Ocean City in late morning -- close enough to cause tropical-force winds, heavy rain and flooding.
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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2004
As if the winds weren't enough bad news, hydrologists told anxious Floridians yesterday that water - pumped by Hurricane Frances from the ocean and the sky - could pose an even more serious threat to their lives and property. A storm surge of up to 12 feet during two high-tide cycles this weekend could submerge up to a third of the barrier dunes north of storm's center and batter beachfront homes, they said. Worse, as much as 18 inches of rain is forecast for Central Florida over at least two days - adding more woes to a state already soggy from two to three times its normal rainfall in August.
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By John-Thor Dahlburg and John-Thor Dahlburg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 8, 2005
COCOA, Fla. - Officials ordered all residents and tourists to leave the southern half of the Florida Keys yesterday as Hurricane Dennis, an unusually powerful July storm, attained "major" status as it slogged north in warm Caribbean waters. Packing sustained winds of 115 mph and classified as a Category 3 hurricane, Dennis could subject the lower Keys to dangerous winds and a 3- to 6-foot storm surge by this afternoon, the National Hurricane Center in Miami said. "We recommend you pack up, secure your property as best you can and leave," Monroe County Sheriff's Deputy Becky Herrin said her department advised those in the southernmost Keys.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
By Monday evening, Hurricane Sandy's remains surrounded Ocean City . From the east, the evening high tide, a full moon and a 7-foot storm surge sent waves crashing over dunes in some spots. To the west, a white-capped Assawoman Bay overflowed onto the narrow barrier island. Gusts whipping to near-hurricane force turned gaps between high rises into wind tunnels. A decision by town officials to close the Route 90 bridge to nonemergency traffic at 5 p.m. meant there was nothing for those who stayed behind to do but wait, or call for help.
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By KEN KAYE AND MARK HOLLIS and KEN KAYE AND MARK HOLLIS,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | June 13, 2006
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- A strengthening Tropical Storm Alberto was forecast to strike Florida's upper Gulf Coast today as a minimal hurricane with 75 mph winds, pounding rain and a 10-foot storm surge, forcing the evacuation of more than 20,000 residents. If so, it would be the earliest hurricane to strike the state in 40 years, according to the National Hurricane Center in Miami. With the projected track taking the storm's center about 130 miles north of Tampa, residents of five rural counties in the Big Bend area were ordered yesterday to evacuate, 12 days into the hurricane season.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 14, 2012
New research indicates that rising sea level from climate change will roughly double the risks of storm-related flooding in coastal communities in Maryland and nationwide. Scientists with Climate Central , an independent nonprofit journalism and research organization, have produced maps showing how even small increases in sea level rise are likely to push storm surges onto shore. They've also published their findings in peer-reviewed journals. In Maryland, past and future global warming nearly doubles the estimated odds of “century” or worse floods occurring within the next 18 years, they say  - meaning floods so high they would historically be expected just once per century.  Elsewhere along the nation's coastline, the risks triple.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
A year ago, Hurricane Sandy was imminent, and now 12 months later, signs of recovery from the storm remain in Crisfield and Garrett County. In Crisfield, charity workers will on Monday dedicate the first two houses to be rebuilt since Sandy's winds and storm surge funneled floodwaters across the Eastern Shore town. Garrett County meanwhile is putting the finishing touches on a new emergency operations center that could help coordinate rescue efforts in future storms like Sandy, which dumped up to 3 feet of heavy, wet snow, cutting off power and stranding residents.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
Hurricane Sandy blew the waters of the Little Annemessex River into living rooms across the Somerset County town of Crisfield one year ago, displacing hundreds of families, some still homeless a year later. Their numbers began to shrink Monday when charity workers dedicated the first two houses to be rebuilt since the storm. Many others have been repaired. Across the state, thousands in Garrett County endured days without electricity after Sandy dumped more than two feet of unusually wet, heavy snow, and emergency officials managed rescue efforts from a courthouse basement with a slow Internet connection.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
AccuWeather.com is predicting another active Atlantic hurricane season, particularly for the U.S. coastline. While the Pennsylvania-based meteorology company is calling for fewer storms in all, with 16 tropical storms versus 19 in 2012, AccuWeather's season outlook suggests four storms could become major hurricanes, compared with one in 2012. AccuWeather expects three storms to make landfall in the U.S., compared with four in 2012. "After a devastating blow to the East from Superstorm Sandy in October of 2012, residents and homeowners on the Atlantic coast should anticipate another active season in 2013," the forecast warns.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2013
The Eastern Shore town of Bellevue saw the heaviest rains in the U.S. during Superstorm Sandy, according to an official report on the storm the National Hurricane Center released Tuesday. The town, across the Tred Avon River from Oxford and just south of St. Michael's in Talbot County, recorded 12.83 inches of rain. Nearby Easton was not far behind with 12.55 inches. The bullseye of Sandy's deluge was on the middle Eastern Shore, though storm surge levels were higher to the northeast around New York.
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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
Storm trackers are continuing to refine their predictions for a nor'easter set to strike Maryland later this week, calling for strong rain and wind on Wednesday - most heavily along the Eastern Shore - and possibly snow on Thursday. "We're not looking at Sandy-type numbers, but it looks like this thing could pack a pretty good punch," said Steve Goldstein, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, about what residents can expect from the storm on the heels of superstorm Sandy's pounding.
NEWS
October 31, 2012
WEATHER: Mostly cloudy, high near 55 and a 20 percent chance of precipitation. A coastal flood advisory is in effect until noon. TRAFFIC: Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues. SCHOOL CLOSINGS : Baltimore City and Harford schools are closed today. Anne Arundel , Baltimore County and Howard schools are open except for those without power . SANDY'S AFTERMATH Maryland 'dodged a bullet' with powerful storm : Sandy 's howling winds and torrential rains walloped Maryland, cutting electricity to more than 300,000 utility customers and disrupting life for millions.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2012
Residents and tourists deserted downtown Ocean City on Sunday afternoon after officials ordered an evacuation of the town's southernmost blocks as Hurricane Sandy began to whip the shores. But at the Purple Moose Saloon on the Boardwalk, owner Gary Walker was waiting until the very last moment to close up. With a single customer nursing a beer at around 3 p.m., he wasn't holding out for a surge of business. Rather, Walker said he wasn't impressed by the power Sandy had shown so far. Despite the evacuation south of 17th Street, he planned to stay near the bar through the storm - or inside it if the storm worsened, on a single mattress made up with clean sheets in the back of the bar, under black lights and a disco ball.
NEWS
By Maria L. LaGanga, Scott Gold and Stephen Braun | September 24, 2005
BEAUMONT, TEXAS -- A weakening Hurricane Rita howled toward the Texas and Louisiana coastline yesterday, its top winds at 120 mph, pushing water over a patched levee in New Orleans and paralyzing major highways for hours as more than 1 million people fled inland to avoid the storm. The storm was downgraded to Category 3 at 11 a.m. by the National Hurricane Center, which continued to warn that Rita is a very dangerous storm. Center official Ed Rappaport said Rita would hit land near the Louisiana-Texas border "just before daybreak."
NEWS
By Scott Dance, Mary Gail Hare and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
As Sandy pounds the mid-Atlantic coast Monday, the Baltimore region is bracing for gale-force winds and flooding. The area remains under a flood watch through Tuesday evening, with coastal flooding expected late Monday into Wednesday morning, according to the National Weather Service. Heavy rain, as much as six inches, and high winds, with gusts as much as 70 miles per hour, will occur throughout Monday afternoon and well into Tuesday, according to forecasters. Mandatory travel restrictions will be imposed in Baltimore at 6 p.m. on Monday and stay in effect until noon on Tuesday, banning driving on city streets for everyone but emergency personnel.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
More than 10,000 homes in the metro Baltimore region -- valued at a total of $3.5 billion -- are at risk for potential storm-surge damage, according to housing market analysis firm  CoreLogic.  "Hurricane-driven storm-surge flooding can cause significant property damage when high winds and low pressure causes water to amass inside the storm, releasing a powerful rush over land when the hurricane moves on shore," said CoreLogic, which made...
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