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By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | December 20, 2009
The call coming into Baltimore's storm center on Calvert Street sounded urgent: A city resident needed dialysis, but the clinic's bus couldn't get through her snow-covered street to pick her up for treatment. "This is a person who lives on a street with two hills," explained Meghan Butasek, with the city health department. She ran through the details with an official in the conference room. "So she needs her street cleared?" asked Scott Brillman, with the city's Office of Emergency Management.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
The broken tree limbs and large puddles remain from Monday's storm, but forecasters are already looking ahead to more severe weather chances Wednesday and Thursday. Maryland is included in areas with about 15 percent chances of severe storms both afternoons, according to the Storm Prediction Center. On Wednesday, the prime risk for damaging winds and large hail is in the Ohio Valley. Parts of Illinois, Indiana and Ohio are being estimated to stand as much as a 45 percent chance of severe weather -- among the highest odds the storm center will assign a day in advance.
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NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Staff Writer | February 8, 1993
The Blizzard of '83 was just a gleam in a weatherman's eye the second Tuesday of that year's February, when a low-pressure system entered the country from the cold Pacific Ocean and resolutely headed for the Rocky Mountains.It was over northeastern Nevada by the next day, and the weather forecasters, poring over their charts and checking their computers, began to utter a U.S. Weather Service equivalent of "Uh-Oh." At noon Wednesday, the service issued a winter-storm watch for the East Coast.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
The storms that have ravaged Oklahoma and other Plains states the past few days could reach Maryland and the mid-Atlantic by Wednesday and Thursday, albeit weakened, according to the National Weather Service. The region faces slight risks of severe weather Wednesday and Thursday as a cold front moves toward the hot, humid air that has been settled over the region this week. The weather is still going to get more muggy before the cold front arrives, with highs possible in the lower 90s Wednesday and dew points nearing 70 degrees in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
Chances for passing rains, some with a few rumbles of thunder, continue into tonight and tomorrow, according to the National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center, though the weather has remained dry for most of the area. One Sun staffer based in Towson said that area awoke to heavy rains and thunder early this morning, but other areas haven't seen any such weather. At BWI Marshall Airport, a hundredth of an inch of rain fell around midnight, but otherwise, it has been dry. Central Maryland is included in an area with a slight chance of storms producing heavy winds and hail Thursday, according to the storm center.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 10, 2012
Steady showers moved across Maryland this morning, and forecasts are still showing there could be more where that came from late this afternoon. Relatively cool temperatures could keep the most severe storms at bay, though. A quarter of an inch of rain fell at BWI Marshall Airport between 6 a.m. and 11 a.m. It followed 0.19 inches of rain Thursday at the airport. At The Sun's weather station at Calvert and Centre streets downtown, 0.28 inches of rain fell starting after 6:30 a.m. The heaviest rainfall was recorded between 7 a.m. and 7:30 a.m., at a rate of 1.35 inches per hour.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 2, 2012
The storm that devastated much of Maryland on Friday, known as a "derecho", not the first of its kind to strike the state, but its impact was among the most severe and widespread. Derechos are widespread storms in which multiple bands of strong storms packing damaging winds move hundreds of miles. According to the National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center, their name comes from the Spanish word for "direct" or "straight ahead", which is the way the storms typically move.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 9, 2012
Chances of severe weather are looming both Thursday and Friday afternoons, with weather watchers weighing in on everything from damaging winds to flash flooding to hail. The National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center gives Maryland a 5 percent chance of severe winds and hail this afternoon. The heaviest storm activity is predicted to be across Ohio, with a small chance of tornadoes there. Friday, the chance of severe weather rises to 15 percent in Maryland. The storm center hasn't yet posted probability maps of specific threats of wind, tornadoes or hail for Friday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Storms that passed through Maryland and Virginia on Saturday spawned six separate tornado warnings, including one in which a funnel cloud was spotted in Anne Arundel County, but none have been confirmed as tornadoes. That's according to a review of the storms the National Weather Service's Sterling, Va., office posted on its website. The storms passed through between about 3 p.m. and 5 p.m., knocking down trees from Washington County to Anne Arundel County and to the south and west in Virginia.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
The broken tree limbs and large puddles remain from Monday's storm, but forecasters are already looking ahead to more severe weather chances Wednesday and Thursday. Maryland is included in areas with about 15 percent chances of severe storms both afternoons, according to the Storm Prediction Center. On Wednesday, the prime risk for damaging winds and large hail is in the Ohio Valley. Parts of Illinois, Indiana and Ohio are being estimated to stand as much as a 45 percent chance of severe weather -- among the highest odds the storm center will assign a day in advance.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
Forecasters are predicting more tornadoes to strike parts of the central U.S. Monday, in areas still recovering from severe weather outbreaks that hit Sunday. An area home to more than 5 million people, stretching from northern Texas, through parts of Oklahoma and Arkansas to southern Missouri, faces elevated risks of severe weather and tornadoes, according to the Storm Prediction Center . The most significant risk of tornadoes is expected in southeastern Oklahoma. A much larger area, from central Texas up to the Great Lakes, could see severe storms Monday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
A weather system that is spawning severe storms across the southern Plains states is forecast to reach the East Coast on Friday, bringing a chance for strong (but not likely severe) storms here and colder temperatures. The Storm Prediction Center is cautioning of a risk for tornadoes, large hail and damaging winds Wednesday afternoon and evening in parts of Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas. Most of Missouri was under a tornado watch as of early Wednesday afternoon. Storm risks are expected to shift eastward Thursday , with the most danger along the Mississippi River Valley.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
Chances for passing rains, some with a few rumbles of thunder, continue into tonight and tomorrow, according to the National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center, though the weather has remained dry for most of the area. One Sun staffer based in Towson said that area awoke to heavy rains and thunder early this morning, but other areas haven't seen any such weather. At BWI Marshall Airport, a hundredth of an inch of rain fell around midnight, but otherwise, it has been dry. Central Maryland is included in an area with a slight chance of storms producing heavy winds and hail Thursday, according to the storm center.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
Storms that passed through Maryland and Virginia on Saturday spawned six separate tornado warnings, including one in which a funnel cloud was spotted in Anne Arundel County, but none have been confirmed as tornadoes. That's according to a review of the storms the National Weather Service's Sterling, Va., office posted on its website. The storms passed through between about 3 p.m. and 5 p.m., knocking down trees from Washington County to Anne Arundel County and to the south and west in Virginia.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 10, 2012
Steady showers moved across Maryland this morning, and forecasts are still showing there could be more where that came from late this afternoon. Relatively cool temperatures could keep the most severe storms at bay, though. A quarter of an inch of rain fell at BWI Marshall Airport between 6 a.m. and 11 a.m. It followed 0.19 inches of rain Thursday at the airport. At The Sun's weather station at Calvert and Centre streets downtown, 0.28 inches of rain fell starting after 6:30 a.m. The heaviest rainfall was recorded between 7 a.m. and 7:30 a.m., at a rate of 1.35 inches per hour.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 9, 2012
Chances of severe weather are looming both Thursday and Friday afternoons, with weather watchers weighing in on everything from damaging winds to flash flooding to hail. The National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center gives Maryland a 5 percent chance of severe winds and hail this afternoon. The heaviest storm activity is predicted to be across Ohio, with a small chance of tornadoes there. Friday, the chance of severe weather rises to 15 percent in Maryland. The storm center hasn't yet posted probability maps of specific threats of wind, tornadoes or hail for Friday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
The storms that have ravaged Oklahoma and other Plains states the past few days could reach Maryland and the mid-Atlantic by Wednesday and Thursday, albeit weakened, according to the National Weather Service. The region faces slight risks of severe weather Wednesday and Thursday as a cold front moves toward the hot, humid air that has been settled over the region this week. The weather is still going to get more muggy before the cold front arrives, with highs possible in the lower 90s Wednesday and dew points nearing 70 degrees in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | July 8, 1991
The lightning that sizzled down on Maryland from yesterday's thunderstorms had been under close watch for several hours by power managers at the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.Using a remarkable nationwide network of lightning-detection antennas and computer displays, they watched each strike as the storms brewed over south-central Pennsylvania before noon.When the lightning began menacing BG&E's service territory in Harford, Baltimore and Carroll counties, utility officials put out a call for Dick Lepson.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Dave Jones is trying to shrink the world, one crisis at a time. The former TV weatherman wants emergency managers and decision-makers to have simultaneous access to real-time information so they can keep people out of harm's way. And he wants them to be able to swap ideas whether they are standing before a big screen in a command center, hunched over a laptop in a shelter or grasping a tablet while hovering over the scene in a rescue helicopter....
NEWS
July 7, 2012
If you witnessed the thunderstorms that hit the area Friday, June 29, you might have thought that they seemed more intense than normal. What was soon evident was this was no average thunderstorm. High winds peaked at 70 mph, downing limbs and uprooting trees. This storm ripped a swath of damage across multiple states and left millions without power, including 564,000 BGE customers in eight counties and Baltimore City. The "derecho" storm, as it has been categorized, left no time for usual preparation.
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