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August 30, 2011
Editor: I would like to publicly thank the Bel Air Barnes & Noble bookstore for their role in recovering from hurricane Irene. I am writing this message on my mobile device from inside their store Sunday afternoon. I am using their free Wi-Fi service and one of their electrical outlets. And, for over an hour there were six others near me doing the same thing. Nearly every outlet in the store had somebody plugged in with a notebook, tablet, or a phone. So, thank you Barnes & Noble for supporting the wireless users of Bel Air during the power outage.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
A city police officer was charged with felony assault after he stormed into a home in full uniform Monday and threatened to kill his wife with his service weapon, Baltimore police said. After the alleged attack, Officer Gualberto Diaz, 38, reported to work and asked to be excused from the rest of his shift. After police investigated the attack, Diaz was arrested Monday and taken to Central Booking. A judge ordered him held without bail Tuesday, according to court records. In a statement, the Police Department's top disciplinarian condemned Diaz.
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NEWS
By Carla Correa | December 20, 2009
A bout 75 people were at Federal Hill Park on Saturday afternoon, either for sledding or a snowball fight that was organized via Facebook and Twitter on Friday. A handful of people brought coffee, cans of beer or bottles of cheap wine. Someone brought a boom box, wrapped in a garbage bag, that provided music. One man was buried in the snow as if he were being covered by sand at a beach. Snow-goers used snow tubes, saucers and tops of garbage cans to sled down the hill; three inventive types even used blow-up air mattresses in lieu of sleds.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
As a tropical cyclone churned the Atlantic Ocean this month, a drone watched from above, dropping a paper-towel-roll-sized set of sensors attached to a parachute through the clouds on a 20-minute, 10-mile journey. The instruments revealed dry air low in the storm's center - something scientists from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center suspect was the nascent eye of Hurricane Edouard. The storm went on to become the Atlantic's first to reach winds of more than 110 mph since Sandy in 2012, though it never threatened the United States.
NEWS
November 14, 2012
When Katrina hit, President George W. Bush was excoriated for not violating Federal Emergency Management Agency mandates and asking Louisiana for permission to enter the disaster zone. When Louisiana's Democratic governor, senators and New Orleans mayor would not respond, President Bush went in anyway with the relief columns. He got nothing but lies, exaggerations and name-calling for his efforts and accusations he wasn't around. Now let us shift to 2012. President Barack Obama is mostly anywhere else but near the disaster area and not a word of criticism is leveled.
NEWS
February 7, 2010
Surviving the storm Here are some tips for coping with the impact and aftermath of a snowstorm like the one that slammed Baltimore and the surrounding area this weekend. If you must travel •Let someone know your timetable and your routes. •Stay on main roads. Avoid back-road shortcuts. •Carry a winter storm survival kit, including mobile phone, blankets, flashlight with extra batteries, food, water and a shovel. •If you get stranded, don't leave your vehicle.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
The climate pattern that has sent two storms up the East Coast in the past month could re-emerge around Thanksgiving, making for a possibly wet holiday. Blocking over the Atlantic is expected next week, though where it settles and how it interacts with weather systems isn't clear yet. But one important indicator, the North Atlantic Oscillation, is showing stormy weather is likely, according to AccuWeather meteorologist Henry Margusity. The National Weather Service expects the highest rain potential for the coastal Carolinas and the Delmarva peninsula, according to the latest models . But it's not clear yet how closely the storm will track to the coast, forecasters say. AccuWeather's Elliot Abrams is leaning toward a mild and dry Thanksgiving, but a large storm is lurking off the coast in models, which could change as the time nears.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 29, 2012
The full force of Sandy hasn't even hit Maryland yet, but regulators here are warning consumers against the scam artists who inevitably will pop up. The Maryland Attorney General said that once the storm leaves the area, homeowners with damaged houses and cars will likely be further hurt by repair scams. “Be careful with door-to-door salesmen using high pressure tactics to get your hard-earned money. That money may vanish while the repair goes undone,” says AG Doug Gansler.
NEWS
September 10, 2011
In his letter ridiculing the "Bible thumpers" who believe hurricanes and other natural disasters are punishments from God, Luther Starnes appears to promote a common but dangerous misconception when he writes that "attributing destruction and vengeance to an all-loving God could border on blasphemy" ("Angry deity or intense low-pressure system?" Sept. 4). Yes, God is love, and His grace and mercy are unfathomable.  But if you read the New Testament carefully, to say nothing of the Old Testament, it is abundantly clear that God's love is balanced by His justice, which leads at times to much "destruction and vengeance" on those who do evil.  In fact, God declares emphatically that His followers are not to take revenge on others but to "leave room for God's wrath, for it is written: 'It is mine to avenge; I will repay' say the Lord.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
I'm not keen on anthropomorphizing nature, a tendency best left to nineteenth-century poets: Shelley, Wordsworth, that element.  So I grit my teeth and endure the National Weather Service's practice of naming tropical storms and hurricanes. It's a well-established tradition, and at least the weather service has started using male as well as female names, and the Associated Press Stylebook  has long since frowned on calling storms and ships "she. "* But the Weather Channel's whim to name winter storms, including the one buffeting the Northeast today, strikes me as a crass and inept attempt to gin up publicity for itself while whipping up public excitement over the weather.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 15, 2014
Baltimore and Annapolis are likely to suffer serious coastal flooding again before this century is over, and people and property in Ocean City and on the lower Eastern Shore face even greater risks as climate change accelerates sea level rise along Maryland's extensive shoreline, warns a new report. Drawing on new government data and projections, Climate Centra l, a nonprofit research and information group, calculates that 41,000 homes with 55,000 residents in the state are in danger under mid-range sea-level rise projections if storm-driven flooding surges five feet above the high tide line - which it did in the Baltimore area and elsewhere during Tropical Storm Isabel in 2003.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
There weren't any keepers yet, but the fish were definitely biting for Willie Edwards one day last week as he trolled along the edge of the Susquehanna Flats. The 72-year-old fisherman from North East said he'd caught "a lot of little rock," or striped bass. The Flats - a vast, grass-covered shoal at the mouth of the Susquehanna River - are a magnet for fish and the anglers who pursue them. But they're also a symbol to scientists of the Chesapeake Bay's resilience, and of its ability to rebound, if given a chance, from decades of pollution and periodic battering by storms.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
R. Alonzo "Lonz" Childress, a civil engineer whose career with the Baltimore County Department of Public Works spanned more than 40 years, died Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of complications from an infection. The Taneytown resident was 72. "Lonz was one of the most pragmatic and even-keeled persons that you'd ever meet. He was good at getting to the bottom of problems," said Brian L. Childress, a nephew who is a civil engineer with D.S. Thaler & Associates. "He always maintained a steady course and never got worked up. He could solve engineering problems without ever getting out of sync," said Mr. Childress, who lives in Perry Hall.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Tropical Storm Cristobal is following much the same path as Hurricane Bertha took, expected to stay well off the Atlantic coast as it heads north, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm was about 115 miles east-northeast of San Salvador island in the Bahamas and had maximum sustained winds of 60 mph as of 8 a.m. Monday. Cristobal is expected to slowly strengthen over the next couple of days, possibly reaching hurricane status, according to the hurricane center. So far, the cyclone has taken a similar course as Bertha did at the beginning of the month, tracking through the Lesser Antilles, Hispaniola and the Bahamas before heading up north-northeastward well off the East Coast.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
After shrinking for a while to its smallest size in 30 years, the Chesapeake Bay's "dead zone" has made a late-summer comeback, and that's not good for crabs, fish and oysters. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources reports that the volume of bay water with too little oxygen in it for fish to breathe -- also known as the "dead zone" -- rebounded in early August to its 8th largest size.  In early July, the zone had dipped to a record-low volume in early July, a shift scientists attributed to Hurricane Arthur stirring the bay's waters as the storm passed by Maryland on its way up the Atlantic coast.  With the dead zone back to above-average, the volume of low-oxygen water in the main bay was estimated last week to be 1.32 cubic miles.  That's about what government and University of Maryland scientists had predicted early in the summer, based on high river flows resulting from a wetter spring this year than in 2013.  Heavy rains and snow melt tend to wash more nitrogen and phosphorus off the land into the water, where the plant nutrients stimulate algae blooms, followed by a dip in oxygen levels in the bay's depths.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Severe storms were forming Thursday evening just north of the Mason-Dixon Line and were expected to bring risks of damaging winds, large hail and isolated tornadoes to the Baltimore area, according to the National Weather Service. Storms are expected to reach the region between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Weather service forecasters described the risks in a special weather statement covering the Baltimore region: THESE STORMS MAY BE CAPABLE OF PRODUCING LARGE HAIL...DAMAGING WINDS...FREQUENT CLOUD TO GROUND LIGHTNING AND VERY HEAVY RAIN.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
More cloudy weather with chances for passing showers or storms are forecast Thursday in the Baltimore area, with temperatures possibly warming to the upper 80s. About a 30 percent chance of showers is forecast in the morning hours, with 50 percent chances of storms in the evening and overnight. Humidity is forecast to be high thanks to a southerly flow of moist air from the Gulf of Mexico. Dew points are expected in the lower 70s, an uncomfortable level that could make it feel closer to 90 degrees.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com | December 20, 2009
A ferocious storm walloped Maryland on the last weekend before Christmas, shutting down shopping malls and airports, clogging roads and keeping most people hunkered in their homes to wait out the unusual pre-holiday snow. The weather system, which the National Weather Service said broke a record for a December storm in this area, dumped as much as 18 to 20 inches in some areas as Gov. Martin O'Malley declared a state of emergency and deployed the National Guard. It punished retailers and procrastinating holiday shoppers on one of the year's busiest shopping days, and for a time put the Ravens' afternoon contest today in doubt when the Chicago Bears' initial flight into BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport was delayed.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Oppressively muggy air over the region Thursday is forecast to help fuel storm chances in the afternoon and evening. Temperatures are forecast to reach the upper 80s, with dew points in the upper 60s and lower 70s making it feel hot and uncomfortable. Storms are possible in the afternoon and evening hours. Storm chances extend into Friday, with humidity remaining high and temperatures reaching the lower 80s. Highs are forecast to drop back to the upper 70s Friday and Saturday, with storm chances lingering into Saturday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
A system of rain and thunderstorms about 350 miles east of the Lesser Antilles islands could become the third named storm of the Atlantic hurricane season within the next several days, according to the National Hurricane Center. Forecasters give it a 70 percent chance of forming into a tropical cyclone, which would be named Tropical Storm Cristobal, within five days. While it's still too early to forecast any track or intensity with any certainty, models suggest it could track across Puerto Rico, Hispaniola and Cuba, then the Bahamas and Florida.
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