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By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
In the battle of waterfront towns, Newport, R.I., has beaten Baltimore for the right to host the only U.S. stopover of the around-the-world Volvo Ocean Race in 2015. Volvo race CEO Knut Frostad and other officials were on their way to Providence for a Tuesday afternoon news conference at the Rhode Island State House. State officials have promised to spend more than $3 million to build a legacy sailing facility for the visit. Ocean Racing USA, the Baltimore bidder, and other officials were informed of the decision in a conference call Friday.
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NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2013
Volvo Ocean Race organizers wanted to come to Baltimore in May 2015 as part of their 'round-the-world competition but had one request: Could it share the spotlight with the Preakness Stakes or bump the Triple Crown horse race to another date? The city said thanks, but no way. So Tuesday, the only U.S. stopover of the Volvo went instead to Newport, R.I. "We were shocked," said Robert Housman, executive director of Ocean Racing USA, the Baltimore bidder. "It would be discouraging to work hard on something and lose, but clearly they moved the finish line.
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NEWS
June 15, 2007
Above, Peter Davies, town crier of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, practices his bell-ringing aboard the Bluenose II, docked at the Naval Academy. The replica of the schooner that won the first America's Cup completes its visit today and moves on for a two-day stopover in Baltimore. At left, members of the Musique 400 Troupe dance with visitors. Phil Roberts plays the fife.
NEWS
January 26, 2011
I just finished reading Paul Lewis' tongue-in-cheek letter to the editor of The Sun ( "Maybe the Toaster finally figured out where Poe was born," Jan. 23), in which he comments on Edgar Allan Poe's mysterious toaster presumably resurfacing in Boston. I at first took umbrage at the tone of the letter, taking Mr. Lewis' comment "...when Poe died there during what was supposed to be a brief stopover... " as an insult to Baltimore, implying that Baltimore has little, if any, claim to Poe's legacy.
SPORTS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1998
The visit to Baltimore and Annapolis in the Whitbread Round the World Race has been a success on so many major counts -- there were spectators, there was publicity, there was even wind -- that some race officials feel almost certain the international competition will return to the Chesapeake."
SPORTS
By Ellen Gamerman BTC and Ellen Gamerman BTC,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1998
One day, a young sailor will look out at the sea, imagine a distant adventure and proclaim: "I want to do the Volvo."The Volvo?It may sound a little strange, but the future organizers of the Whitbread Round the World Race expect that one day a new generation of sailors will know the 31,600-nautical-mile adventure its new name, the Volvo Ocean Race Round the World.Volvo, the Swedish car company, revealed details yesterday about its new ownership of the race after a 25-year sponsorship by the English brewery Whitbread.
NEWS
January 26, 2011
I just finished reading Paul Lewis' tongue-in-cheek letter to the editor of The Sun ( "Maybe the Toaster finally figured out where Poe was born," Jan. 23), in which he comments on Edgar Allan Poe's mysterious toaster presumably resurfacing in Boston. I at first took umbrage at the tone of the letter, taking Mr. Lewis' comment "...when Poe died there during what was supposed to be a brief stopover... " as an insult to Baltimore, implying that Baltimore has little, if any, claim to Poe's legacy.
SPORTS
By Dail Willis and Peter Baker and Dail Willis and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1998
Gov. Parris N. Glendening, a passenger aboard the Coast Guard cutter Northland, had to be a fast learner yesterdaybefore he could fire the Whitbread starting gun."I'm going to get the weapons guy up there to show him how to do it," said Cmdr. Beverly Kelley, the ship's top officer, as she stood in the receiving line to greet the governor and other dignitaries. "He's going to have to get it real quick."And he did, receiving his certification -- an official letter signed by him and by Kelley and required for anyone who does a job on board -- just moments before he joined four costumed "Coasties" on the forward deck.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2003
If the Volvo Ocean Race makes just one U.S. stopover on its nine-month jaunt around the world in 2005-06, Baltimore-Annapolis appears to be the most likely port of call. In a move to save money and attract a larger field of competitors, race officials are expected to trim the number of stops from 10 to about six and eliminate one of two U.S. ports. The route and other race specifics will be announced at a news conference on Feb. 11 in Auckland, New Zealand, the site of the America's Cup competition.
NEWS
By CANDUS THOMSON AND ANNIE LINSKEY and CANDUS THOMSON AND ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTERS | April 2, 2006
After five months of bone-jarring, teeth-rattling adventure at the earth's extremes, the sailors of the Volvo Ocean Race are on their way to Maryland, the Land of Pleasant Living. If only the wind holds out. The six yachts will leave Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, today for the 5,000-mile voyage north and arrive at the Inner Harbor around April 15. They will be on display as part of the Baltimore Waterfront Festival from April 27 until May 4, when they head to Annapolis for the three-day Maryland Maritime Heritage Festival.
NEWS
June 15, 2007
Above, Peter Davies, town crier of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, practices his bell-ringing aboard the Bluenose II, docked at the Naval Academy. The replica of the schooner that won the first America's Cup completes its visit today and moves on for a two-day stopover in Baltimore. At left, members of the Musique 400 Troupe dance with visitors. Phil Roberts plays the fife.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2006
If you looked at a map of Earth and tried to plan a round-the-world ocean race, Baltimore might not seem an obvious place to stop. In fact, the route here looks a little like somebody made a wrong turn and dead-ended in Charm City. Other cities around the world that play host to the 35,000-mile Volvo Ocean Race this year perch directly on the sea so that skippers don't need to pick their way through crab pots and miles of shallow water. Nevertheless, this is the third straight time that the ocean racing yachts have made the 120-mile slog from the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay in Norfolk, Va., to Baltimore.
NEWS
By BRENT JONES and BRENT JONES,SUN REPORTER | April 11, 2006
Five tall ships and a government research vessel are slated to dock in at the Inner Harbor during visits late this month and in early May as part of the Volvo Ocean Race stopover in Baltimore, according to Sail Baltimore, a local nonprofit group that welcomes visiting ships. The vessels, along with the racing craft, are expected to draw as many as 500,000 visitors, said Laura Stevenson, executive director of Sail Baltimore. The organization was founded in 1975 and has hosted more than 400 visiting ships and 35 maritime events.
NEWS
By CANDUS THOMSON AND ANNIE LINSKEY and CANDUS THOMSON AND ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTERS | April 2, 2006
After five months of bone-jarring, teeth-rattling adventure at the earth's extremes, the sailors of the Volvo Ocean Race are on their way to Maryland, the Land of Pleasant Living. If only the wind holds out. The six yachts will leave Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, today for the 5,000-mile voyage north and arrive at the Inner Harbor around April 15. They will be on display as part of the Baltimore Waterfront Festival from April 27 until May 4, when they head to Annapolis for the three-day Maryland Maritime Heritage Festival.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | February 22, 2006
Deep in the south ocean near Antarctica, the six skippers sailing in the Volvo Ocean Race are worried about giant squid, whales and stray icebergs on the longest and traditionally most treacherous leg of the round-the-world race. It is safe to say they aren't thinking about Baltimore. But in eight weeks, if all goes as planned, these boats will sail up the Chesapeake Bay for a three-week reprieve in Charm City and Annapolis. Ocean Race Chesapeake, a group organizing events while the boats are in Maryland, announced yesterday a schedule of events for the stopover that includes festivals, regattas, awards ceremonies and school tours.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | January 5, 2006
Cutting-edge technology is proving no match for sea water and strong winds. For the second time in the opening stages of the global Volvo Ocean Race, two of the rocket-fast but eggshell-fragile yachts are heading to port for repairs after major malfunctions. Meanwhile, organizers of the Baltimore and Annapolis stopover in April met yesterday to discuss options if the two-week waterfront celebration that has attracted 500,000 visitors in previous years has to be altered. "By hook or by crook, we're going to have an event," said Greg Barnhill, president of Ocean Race Chesapeake.
NEWS
By BRENT JONES and BRENT JONES,SUN REPORTER | April 11, 2006
Five tall ships and a government research vessel are slated to dock in at the Inner Harbor during visits late this month and in early May as part of the Volvo Ocean Race stopover in Baltimore, according to Sail Baltimore, a local nonprofit group that welcomes visiting ships. The vessels, along with the racing craft, are expected to draw as many as 500,000 visitors, said Laura Stevenson, executive director of Sail Baltimore. The organization was founded in 1975 and has hosted more than 400 visiting ships and 35 maritime events.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2004
Organizers of the welcoming party for the Volvo Ocean Race now have a genial host with deep pockets to help pay for shindigs in Baltimore and Annapolis. Constellation Energy Group, the Baltimore-based parent of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., announced yesterday that it will spend $500,000 to be the title sponsor of the April 2006 stopover, the only U.S. port-of-call in the seven-month global yacht race. The financial commitment, along with strong civic backing and logistics planning, puts preparations months ahead of the push for the 2001-2002 Volvo stopover, organizers say. "We're well on our way," said Gregory Barnhill, chairman of the board of Ocean Race Chesapeake, the in-port committee.
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