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By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2005
It is not a backyard deck. It is not a wraparound porch. It is the stoop. And that is something entirely different. In the city, the stoop is a gathering place, in the way of an African market, or a town square. It is a listening post. A haven and a hearth. When the weather is warm, families, friends, neighbors and passers-by convene on the stoop and catch up on the day's goings-on. They pass messages and talk smack, they gossip. They cluck their tongues and hoot and whisper. They marvel at the babies: "Good Lord, that girl is getting big!"
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NEWS
March 27, 2014
If this coming November Maryland Republicans look back at the election results and wonder what went wrong, they may want to start with Thursday's vote by the House of Delegates in which every member of their party in attendance voted against a bill to ban discrimination against transgender individuals in employment, housing and public accommodations. That's not a shock, but it's still a disappointment. It appears GOP delegates in the Free State are taking a cue from their right-wing peers in the U.S. House of Representatives and opposing equal accommodations for a group often targeted for violence and discrimination.
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NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | July 5, 2009
There's no need to scoot over. Baltimore's favorite stoop is about to get a lot more wiggle room. Stoop Storytelling, the series in which local residents tell unscripted anecdotes about their lives, has been a hit since its debut performance in February 2006. After the first season, the show's two creators, scrambling to keep up with the demand for tickets, moved the series to Center Stage, with more than double the seats - and nearly every show still sold out. Would-be audience members have been known to try to obtain coveted tickets by offering half-joking bribes of chocolate to members of the box office.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
In seven minutes, Tim Kuhn will progress from first date to realizing he'll never be straight. And that terrifies him. As part of Monday night's Stoop Storytelling show at Center Stage, Kuhn will share with a crowd of strangers how he came to terms with being gay. As the show approached, he spent a considerable amount of time revisiting his breakthrough moment, practiced his monologue several times and now says he's more or less ready....
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Theater Critic | February 3, 2008
Jim Magruder took a deep breath, swung back his arm, and threw his wedding band as far as he could into the audience. That's how he knew he was finally free. "Telling this story has taken the hex off this wedding ring that I haven't known what to do with for ten years," Magruder told the 250 people attending a Stoop Storytelling session in 2006. "If you caught it, give it to someone you love, or sell it on eBay, but I'M DONE WITH IT!"
FEATURES
February 11, 2008
Stories from the stoop Hear seven storytellers on the "stoop" who will talk about family untruths at 8 p.m. at Center Stage, Pearlstone Theater, 700 N. Calvert St. Some of the storytellers include Keith Gayler, Sarah Jennings and Steve Luxenberg. A limited number of standing-room tickets will be available today at the box office for in-person purchase. Call 410-332-0033.
NEWS
August 5, 2001
Stoop Reading program to be launched Thursday An effort to increase reading among young children in Baltimore's neighborhoods will be launched at 1 p.m. Thursday on the steps of The Sun. The 2001 Stoop Reading program -- sponsored by The Safe and Sound Campaign, Baltimore Reads and The Sun's Reading by 9 Program -- will encourage community centers to organize Read Aloud sites throughout the city, asking them to recruit neighborhood readers and kids....
NEWS
By Lawrence Freeny | January 14, 1996
Amply put together,standing tallHis hat perched, Astaire-like,tilted;The tight white coatconforming, allIts buttons coal black,sun-gilted.An aging real-life man'sinclinedTo stoop, regrettably so,we know,His height trimmed byshrinking spine.How like the sun-slimmedman of snow!
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 27, 1999
Daniel is back in the Lions' Den and had better start to pray.It is not a crime to predict the end of the world. Helping is another matter.You know the campaign is getting serious when Gore and Bradley stoop to each other's level.For New Yorkers or anyone else to call John Rocker a half-baked Georgia Cracker would be insensitive, ethnic sterotyping, rude and the exercise of disappointingly poor judgement.
NEWS
December 4, 2008
Stoop returns to helm of Baltimore ATF division The Baltimore field division of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives announced yesterday that the agency has again named Theresa R. Stoop its special agent in charge, her second go-round in the job. She replaces Gregory K. Gant, who moved to the Atlanta ATF division in August. Stoop, who has served with the ATF for 24 years, was also the Baltimore agent in charge from 2000 to 2003. She most recently worked as chief of staff for the ATF acting national director, Michael J. Sullivan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bailey O'Malia | October 19, 2012
I stick with my original opinion of the Miami housewives -- if Elsa is in an episode, it's probably a good episode. Marysol's mother Elsa, opens the episode by threatening to hit a drag queen with her pocket book. Leah finally confronts Marysol and surprisingly apologizes to Marysol.  But Marysol doesn't accept her apology or the invitation to her gala. Adriana confronts Karent (finally) after complaining about "beating her to the tweet" for the last two episodes. Adriana tells Karent she interrupts, is a copycat and thrives on the spotlight. Alexia, a housewife from last season who chose not to be on the show this season because her son was in a very serious car accident, agrees with Adriana.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | September 27, 2012
Last week I wrote about the death of Urbanite magazine from my perspective as a former employee. I soon discovered I was not alone in my sadness. As news of the publication's demise continued to spread, others, like me, seemed to be mourning the loss of not something but someone. A daily paper like The Sun reflects the efforts of professionals to present a city or town as it is. This is important work. But with its fiction contests, personal essay-writing workshops and long-form journalism, Urbanite facilitated something different, a collective meditation on what Baltimore could become.
EXPLORE
November 17, 2011
The Stoop Storytelling Series will present another installment of live, off-the-cuff slices of life Mon., Nov. 21, 8 p.m. at Centerstage. The show will feature local people from various fields speaking on the subject of relatives for an evening titled "We are Family: Stories about the Ties that Bind. " The show will be preceded by a 7 p.m. cocktail hour featuring live music by Felicia Carter and Amy Shook. Admission is $20. Call 410-332-0033 or go to stoopstorytelling.com. Alpacas everywhere The second annual Alpacas and Fleece Festival will happen Saturday-Sunday, Nov. 19-20, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., at the Howard County Fairgrounds (2210 Fairgrounds Road, West Friendship)
EXPLORE
June 7, 2011
The Stoop Storytelling Series, which features local celebrities giving monologues on various topics, will take the form of an old-time radio show at its next happening, Thu.-Sat., June 9-11, 8 p.m., at Centerstage. The upcoming edition of the series is called "The Stoop Says I Do: Stories of Holy and Unholy Matrimony. " The evening will start at 7 p.m. with cocktails and live music by the Bellevederes. Admission is $20. Call 410-332-0033. Great Grapes returns The eighth annual Great Grapes!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2010
The most-visited Stoop in Baltimore has never been more polished. When "O Little Town of Baltimore: A Holiday Live Radio Show" takes the stage on Thursday , it will begin a record run consisting of eight performances instead of, at most, three. The show is being co-produced by Center Stage , and it's the most recent indication that the Stoop Storytelling series, which began four years ago as an experiment, has the potential to become Charm City's newest professional troupe.
NEWS
By Angela Bass and Angela Bass,angela.bass@baltsun.com | July 20, 2009
Baltimore City health officials say full health coverage is just an application away for nearly half of the city's 100,000 uninsured residents. But a surprising number of them are not applying. "Many people just don't know about it," said Kathleen Westcoat, president and chief executive officer of Baltimore HealthCare Access Inc., a city health agency connecting eligible families, singles and kids to seven free or low-cost managed care plans housed under the Medicaid roof. The agency enrolled 9,074 residents of its target 10,000 in one of its Medical Assistance for Families programs by the end of June, not counting those enrolled in its other programs, for which the agency said it does not have figures.
NEWS
By Tim Swift | July 12, 2009
FILM 'Harry Potter: and the Half-Blood Prince': Yes, this is one where we learn all of Voldemort's dirty little secrets. But the real reason to catch the sixth entry in the Potter series may be to see how the young stars handle all the raging hormones at Hogwarts. Harry has his eye on a new girl, and his best mate Ron is caught in the middle of a messy love triangle. In theaters Wednesday. TV 'Spongebob Squarepants' : To celebrate the squishy yellow guy's 10th birthday, Nickelodeon is rolling out a 50-hour marathon of his greatest shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 9, 2009
Larry Doyle's wife says he's funny only when he's talking to someone other than her. Luckily, he should be talking to hundreds of theatergoers at Center Stage tonight for Stoop Storytelling, the popular stage series featuring Baltimoreans relating their tales of Charm City. Doyle, author of the Thurber Prize-winning novel I Love You, Beth Cooper, headlines opening night of the 2009 edition, Baltimoored: Summer in the City, A Live Radio Show. (Maryland's first lady, Katie O'Malley, will take over the top spot Friday night, followed by Wire star Clarke Peters and Rain Pryor, the writer-performer of Fried Chicken and Latkes, on closing night.
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