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By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | March 15, 2006
What is stoneware and why is it so popular? Is it a better conductor than metal or ceramic bakeware? Pottery, that is vessels that are made of fired clay, can roughly be divided into three categories: stoneware, porcelain and earthenware. Stoneware is fired at a high temperature (about 2,185 degrees) which makes it very hard, durable and impervious to water. It is vitreous or semivitreous, though still opaque. Porcelain can be classified as a type of vitreous stoneware, one in which very fine clay becomes translucent when fired.
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NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | March 15, 2006
What is stoneware and why is it so popular? Is it a better conductor than metal or ceramic bakeware? Pottery, that is vessels that are made of fired clay, can roughly be divided into three categories: stoneware, porcelain and earthenware. Stoneware is fired at a high temperature (about 2,185 degrees) which makes it very hard, durable and impervious to water. It is vitreous or semivitreous, though still opaque. Porcelain can be classified as a type of vitreous stoneware, one in which very fine clay becomes translucent when fired.
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FEATURES
By YOLANDA GARFIELD | May 12, 1991
THE EARTHY WARMTH OF HAND-THROWN POTTERY joins with precious metals to achieve a new level of design refinement. Artisan and production potter Tatiana creates completely functional, oven-to-table hand-thrown stoneware, including full sets of dinnerware and accent pieces. Each piece is an example of her unique method of introducing platinum and 24-karat gold onto stoneware pottery.The richness of the look and purity of form and texture have attracted the attention of international designers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 17, 2005
Carlton Leverette, the endlessly inventive ceramic artist whose sources encompass the arts of Asia, Africa and the Pre-Columbian civilizations of the Americas, shows off his latest pieces in a charming exhibition at Galerie Francoise. The exquisitely glazed stoneware bowls, vessels and jars that have become Leverette's signature are again on view, but with a twist: The new work not only seems to incorporate such wildly diverse influences as calligraphy, Pre-Columbian art and graffiti but also (as if that weren't enough already)
FEATURES
By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | October 9, 1994
Q: I would appreciate information on the porcelain covered jar in this photo. It has been in my family for many years and is in perfect condition. On the bottom, it is marked "OHME -- Silesia -- Old Ivory."A: Your jar was made by the Hermann Ohme Porcelain Manufactory in Niedersalzbrunn, Silesia, Germany, now Walbrzych, Poland. The mark you described was used circa 1930. "Old Ivory" is the name of the pattern. Your covered jar would probably be worth about $125 to $135.Q: I have a stoneware crock, 11 inches high and decorated with a paddle-tail bird and flowers in blue.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | July 21, 1991
Sotheby's late June Americana sales used to go off like Fourth of July fireworks, but this June, like last year, there was a more subdued display with only two small items skyrocketing to record heights.John Jay's gold Freedom Box sold for $506,000 and a heart-shaped stoneware inkwell sold for an astonishing $148,500. The gold box set a record for American metalwork; the inkwell took the stoneware record. Both were well-documented, historically important and aesthetically appealing.The 3 1/4 -inch-long gold box presented by the city of New York to statesman John Jay in 1784 was made by Samuel Johnson and engraved by Peter Maverick.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | January 22, 1998
The Mitchell Gallery of St. John's College in Annapolis is now showing an exhibit of more than 50 works of Asian ceramics created in China, Korea, Vietnam and Thailand and dating from 300 B.C. to the 19th century. The show includes porcelains and stoneware, glazed and unglazed pieces in a variety of shapes. Among the pieces are an earthenware jar of about 300 B.C. found in excavations of bronze age culture in northeastern Thailand; a 15th century Vietnamese porcelain dish decorated with a peony spray surrounded by petal designs unique to Vietnamese ceramics; a white porcelain Chinese dish of the 14th or 15th century, and an unglazed gray stoneware Korean vase of the 11th or 12th century.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | February 9, 1997
The best dinnerware designs seem to be used and copied for years. Some have been in use since the 18th century, when porcelain first became inexpensive enough to be made into sets of dishes.The willow pattern showing a bridge, birds, trees and pagoda, and sometimes people, has been used on dishes made in Asia and in England since 1780. The blue-and-white Blue Flower pattern has been made by the Royal Copenhagen factory since 1780. But the pattern that seems to have been made and copied the most is now called Onion or Blue Onion.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | June 30, 1996
I have an old flag that measures 16 1/2 inches by 20 1/2 inches. It has red and white stripes and a blue square with stars. The stars circle one big star and go around the edge of the square. The names Hayes and Wheeler are embroidered on one of the stripes. Do you know about this?You own a rare political campaign flag for presidential candidate Rutherford B. Hayes and his running mate, William Wheeler. The pair ran successfully in 1876.My uncle has a bentwood-style chair made of branches and twigs.
FEATURES
By James G. McCollam and James G. McCollam,Copley News Service | May 26, 1991
Q: Enclosed is a picture of a jug that is marked "Doulton -- Lambeth -- Rd. No. 4818." It is decorated with a ship with the head of a wolf on the sail. Above the ship is the word "Special," below is "Highland Whisky." Would this be considered a collector's item? What is its value? When was it made?A: This is definitely a collector's item. The British Registry number indicates that the design was registered in 1884; it could have been made several years after that date. It is listed in Warman's "English & Continental Pottery & Porcelain" at $75.Q: The enclosed mark is on the bottom of a covered jar. It is 9 inches high and is decorated with seashells and seaweed.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | January 12, 2004
The stuff of Dimitri Hadzi's sculpture, on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery through Saturday, has undergone a curious and surprising evolution in recent years. In his last solo show at Grimaldis, in 2001, the artist presented a series of modestly scaled abstract pieces that evoked the energy of ancient religious rites and Greek mythology. Rather than illustrating the ancient stories, these works recalled their monumental gravitas through carefully worked surfaces that clearly displayed the mark of the artist's own hand on such time-honored sculptural materials as stone and bronze.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2002
Satisfying your curiosity If you have a question about cooking, chances are The Kitchen Answer Book (Capital Books Inc., 2002, $22.95) by Hank Rubin has the answer. Rubin, a former wine critic with the San Francisco Chronicle, arranges his question-and-answer book mainly by food category, such as meat, vegetables and seafood, although there are separate chapters on baking and utensils. Here are 5,000 answers to questions ranging from how to use tap water to the amount of fat in pork sausage.
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 2002
FOR SOME, the word portal conjures up images of roads less traveled. But for Long Reach artist Ann Aves Martin, the word represents her return to a creative life. The Columbia Art Center's next exhibition, Portals, features oil paintings by Martin and three-dimensional pieces by another Long Reach artist, Winnie Coggins. It is Martin's first exhibition after a two-year battle with arthritis. "The show is an official return to myself, to a life that will be very satisfying," Martin said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1998
The archaeologists who excavated the site of the new Raven's stadium in Baltimore are asking for help in finding a curious missing piece from the historic jigsaw puzzle that lies beneath the stadium.For at least two decades -- from 1838 to 1858 -- potters working for downtown china merchant James Pawley cranked out tons of gray, salt-glazed crockery from a stoneware kiln that stood at Russell and Hamburg streets, just outside the new National Football League stadium.The inexpensive jugs, crocks, jars and bottles were the Mason jars and Tupperware of their day, used to store anything from milk and water to pickles, gin and beer.
NEWS
By Becky S. Yoshitani and Becky S. Yoshitani,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 18, 1998
With a passion for art since she was a young child, Rebecca Moy was electrified the first time she observed clay thrown on a potter's wheel. "It was the most incredible thing," she recalls. "The clay came alive."Partner David Young's first encounter with clay was more an act of final desperation than ethereal calling. A self-described miserable student who was anxious to foster a skill while at Glenelg High School, Young followed a teacher's suggestion and gave pottery a whirl. Within three weeks, Young had learned all his teachers could teach.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | January 22, 1998
The Mitchell Gallery of St. John's College in Annapolis is now showing an exhibit of more than 50 works of Asian ceramics created in China, Korea, Vietnam and Thailand and dating from 300 B.C. to the 19th century. The show includes porcelains and stoneware, glazed and unglazed pieces in a variety of shapes. Among the pieces are an earthenware jar of about 300 B.C. found in excavations of bronze age culture in northeastern Thailand; a 15th century Vietnamese porcelain dish decorated with a peony spray surrounded by petal designs unique to Vietnamese ceramics; a white porcelain Chinese dish of the 14th or 15th century, and an unglazed gray stoneware Korean vase of the 11th or 12th century.
FEATURES
By James G. McCollam and James G. McCollam,Copley News Service | May 24, 1992
Q: We would like to have your approximate dating and appraisal of this antique oak corner chair. The frame is original and has been refinished. The seat has been recovered.A: This is a relatively modern version of a Chippendale style. It was made about 1900 and would probably sell for about $500 to $600.Q: The enclosed mark is on the bottom of a porcelain cup and saucer. They are decorated with pink flowers and green leaves with gold embossing.Can you tell me who made them? When were they made, and how much are they worth?
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1998
The archaeologists who excavated the site of the new Raven's stadium in Baltimore are asking for help in finding a curious missing piece from the historic jigsaw puzzle that lies beneath the stadium.For at least two decades -- from 1838 to 1858 -- potters working for downtown china merchant James Pawley cranked out tons of gray, salt-glazed crockery from a stoneware kiln that stood at Russell and Hamburg streets, just outside the new National Football League stadium.The inexpensive jugs, crocks, jars and bottles were the Mason jars and Tupperware of their day, used to store anything from milk and water to pickles, gin and beer.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | February 9, 1997
The best dinnerware designs seem to be used and copied for years. Some have been in use since the 18th century, when porcelain first became inexpensive enough to be made into sets of dishes.The willow pattern showing a bridge, birds, trees and pagoda, and sometimes people, has been used on dishes made in Asia and in England since 1780. The blue-and-white Blue Flower pattern has been made by the Royal Copenhagen factory since 1780. But the pattern that seems to have been made and copied the most is now called Onion or Blue Onion.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | June 30, 1996
I have an old flag that measures 16 1/2 inches by 20 1/2 inches. It has red and white stripes and a blue square with stars. The stars circle one big star and go around the edge of the square. The names Hayes and Wheeler are embroidered on one of the stripes. Do you know about this?You own a rare political campaign flag for presidential candidate Rutherford B. Hayes and his running mate, William Wheeler. The pair ran successfully in 1876.My uncle has a bentwood-style chair made of branches and twigs.
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