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By Dorothy Fleetwood | January 13, 1991
Birthday celebrations for Robert E. Lee continue on Saturday at Arlington House in Arlington, Va. Situated in the midst of Arlington National Cemetery, the mansion was home to Lee and his wife Mary Custis from 1831 to 1861. Saturday's open house will feature a tour of the mansion, music and period refreshments from 1:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Park staff and volunteers will be stationed in various rooms of the mansion to answer questions and discuss Lee's life, particularly those years the Lee family spent at Arlington House.
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From Sun staff reports | January 19, 2014
No. 5 Mount St. Joseph (19-3) outscored St. Paul's 9-6 in overtime to win, 74-71, in boys basketball Saturday night. Iba Camara scored a game-high 20 points for St. Paul's (8-6). Jordan McNeil had 17 for the host Gaels. No. 1 City 75, Stonewall Jackson 45: John Grant scored a game-high 19 points to lead the host Knights (11-0) past the Generals. No. 13 Archbishop Spalding 42, John Carroll 36: Garry Jefferson had 14 points and Jourdan Grant had 12 as the Cavaliers (10-6, 5-3 Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference)
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FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
This week Virginia will honor three native sons who were born in the month of January: Robert E. Lee, born on Jan. 19; his father, who was known as "Light Horse Harry" Lee, on Jan. 29 and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson on Jan. 21.Robert E. Lee's birthplace, Stratford Hall Plantation in Westmoreland County, Va., is the site of two celebrations. Today the public is invited to tour the stately 20-room mansion free of charge from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The dining room will be open for lunch between 11:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. Then, on the general's birthday on Tuesday, the mansion will once again waive admission fees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2003
Fall is a wonderful time to enjoy crisp air and turning leaves in the nearby mountains of Maryland and West Virginia. The historic town of Harpers Ferry, W.Va., located where the Potomac River meets the Shenandoah, offers tours of the historic buildings and sites led by National Park rangers, bike riding and walks along the C&O Canal, hiking on the Appalachian Trail and shopping in a variety of quaint stores, including gift boutiques. The small town has a long history of famous visitors and military events.
NEWS
By Paula Crouch Thrasher and Paula Crouch Thrasher,COX NEWS SERVICE | August 13, 1998
In the Shenandoah Valley, Va. - After visiting endless Civil War museums, battlefields and memorials, you figure you've seen all there is to see of Lt. Gen. Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson.You've already beheld his burial place, a separate grave for his amputated left arm, his prayer book, a scrap of his gray Confederate uniform, even his razor. But then, halfway through a tour of the Virginia Military Institute Museum in Lexington, you come across the general's horse.It's Little Sorrel, all right - stuffed, of course - standing proudly in a battlefield diorama, saddled and poised to bear his master into yet another skirmish.
TRAVEL
By Louise Lione and Louise Lione,Special to the Sun | October 3, 1999
Midweek, late summer, it is quiet under the shade of tall, old trees in the Lexington, Va., historic cemetery. It seems only the stern, straight-backed statue of Old Stonewall -- marking his final resting place and appropriately facing south -- stands in the sun.And that is as it should be. This is, after all, Stonewall Jackson Memorial Cemetery. And the oddball Confederate general, one must conclude after even the most desultory wander about town, is Lexington's hero. Never mind that his commander, Robert E. Lee, lies entombed only a few blocks away.
NEWS
By Kristen Lorek and Kristen Lorek,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 25, 2002
"Through God's blessing, Harper's Ferry and its garrison are to be surrendered," Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson informed his commander, Gen. Robert E. Lee, after the capitulation of Union forces at Harper's Ferry, which was then in Virginia, on Sept. 15, 1862. Jackson's capture of Harper's Ferry resulted in the largest surrender of United States troops during the Civil War. Lee implemented a three-pronged attack to capture the Union arsenal at Harper's Ferry. The Confederacy was now on the offensive, hoping to bring the war away from Richmond, Va., and into Maryland.
NEWS
By Regina Puleo and Regina Puleo,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 16, 2002
When Confederate plans went awry on June 26, 1862, Confederate Maj. Gen. A.P. Hill decided to wage a costly offensive against Union Brig. Gen. Fitz John Porter at Beaver Dam Creek. Unsupported, Hill's forces were repulsed and defeated. Hill expected Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's arrival imminently as he forced a crossing of the Chickahominy River and led his six brigades known as the Light Division through the town of Mechanicsville to encounter Porter's corps entrenched behind Beaver Dam Creek.
FEATURES
January 15, 1995
Historic birthday parties will take place Thursday through Saturday in Lexington, Va., to celebrate the birthdays of Robert E. Lee (Thursday) and Stonewall Jackson (Saturday).Lexington contains homes, colleges, churches and the final resting places for both generals. Activities include a Founder's Day Convocation at Washington and Lee University Thursday; a birthday cake bake-off and party at Campbell House and a slide lecture Friday; free tours and birthday cake at the Stonewall Jackson House and a wreath-laying ceremony by cadets from Virginia Military Institute at his grave Saturday.
FEATURES
By Scott Timberg and Scott Timberg,Special to The Sun | May 31, 1994
His friends dreamed of the Shadow and the Lone Ranger, but young David Sawyer had only one hero: Stonewall Jackson."Back then, there were people like Tom Mix, Tex Ritter, Buck Jones," Mr. Sawyer, 66, says of his boyhood in Depression-era North Carolina. "These were white cowboy heroes. Their deeds of daring were nothing in my mind compared to the legendary Stonewall Jackson."Friends, relatives and teachers were confounded by this young black boy who idolized a Confederate general. But to Mr. Sawyer, Jackson was not only an idol and a role model, he was a relative.
FEATURES
By John Coffren and John Coffren,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2003
HAGERSTOWN - I was perched on the edge of my seat in the historic Maryland Theatre watching Ron Maxwell's sweeping Civil War epic, Gods and Generals. My tension was due in part to the moving narrative and my sense of foreboding: In a few moments, Confederate Lt. Gen. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson (Stephen Lang) would keep a date with history in a nearby wooded tangle of the Wilderness, west of Fredericksburg. He would be shot off his horse by his own pickets, who mistake him and his entourage for Union cavalry, then die of pneumonia eight days later.
NEWS
August 25, 2002
THURSDAY, SEPT. 12 6 p.m.-8 p.m.: first showing of Gods and Generals at the Maryland Theater in Hagerstown 8 p.m.-10 p.m.: second showing of Gods and Generals at the Maryland Theater in Hagerstown FRIDAY, SEPT. 13 8 a.m.: site opens to the public with an opening ceremony and raising of the colors 9 a.m.: artillery demonstration 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.: school program 11 a.m.: uniform review, activity tent 1 Noon: children's games, activity tent 2 1 p.m.: Bill Christen speaks on "The 17th Michigan at Fox's Gap," activity tent 1; Civil War Trails opening ceremony 2 p.m.: cavalry demonstration 2:30 p.m.: Steven R. Stotelmyer speaks on "Legends of South Mountain," activity tent 1 3 p.m.: Glenn LeBoeuf speaks on "How to Join the Hobby," activity tent 2 4 p.m.: battle: Fox's Gap 7 p.m. --10 p.m.: dance, featuring the Libby Prison Minstrels, public invited 10 p.m.: site closes SATURDAY, SEPT.
NEWS
By Kristen Lorek and Kristen Lorek,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 25, 2002
"Through God's blessing, Harper's Ferry and its garrison are to be surrendered," Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson informed his commander, Gen. Robert E. Lee, after the capitulation of Union forces at Harper's Ferry, which was then in Virginia, on Sept. 15, 1862. Jackson's capture of Harper's Ferry resulted in the largest surrender of United States troops during the Civil War. Lee implemented a three-pronged attack to capture the Union arsenal at Harper's Ferry. The Confederacy was now on the offensive, hoping to bring the war away from Richmond, Va., and into Maryland.
NEWS
By Regina Puleo and Regina Puleo,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 16, 2002
When Confederate plans went awry on June 26, 1862, Confederate Maj. Gen. A.P. Hill decided to wage a costly offensive against Union Brig. Gen. Fitz John Porter at Beaver Dam Creek. Unsupported, Hill's forces were repulsed and defeated. Hill expected Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's arrival imminently as he forced a crossing of the Chickahominy River and led his six brigades known as the Light Division through the town of Mechanicsville to encounter Porter's corps entrenched behind Beaver Dam Creek.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2000
Like an odd and fateful conjunction of planets and stars in a paradoxical universe, falling in a cluster this weekend are celebrations of the birthdays of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the great champion of civil rights, and Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, renowned defenders of the slave states of the Confederacy. King was born on Jan. 15, 1929. Lee was born on Jan. 19, 1807. Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson was born on Jan. 21, 1824. King's birthday is a national holiday the third Monday of January, and celebrations abound in Baltimore and Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom LoBianco | January 13, 2000
Lee/Jackson birthday ceremony Celebrate the birthdays of two of the South's most renowned Civil War generals Saturday at the Lee/Jackson Monument. The annual ceremony -- honoring Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson -- will feature Confederate and Federal re-enactment troops. Music from the years of the War Between the States will be performed. Refreshments will be served after the program. The Lee/Jackson birthday ceremony will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday at the Lee/Jackson Monument at Art Museum and Wyman Park drives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom LoBianco | January 13, 2000
Lee/Jackson birthday ceremony Celebrate the birthdays of two of the South's most renowned Civil War generals Saturday at the Lee/Jackson Monument. The annual ceremony -- honoring Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson -- will feature Confederate and Federal re-enactment troops. Music from the years of the War Between the States will be performed. Refreshments will be served after the program. The Lee/Jackson birthday ceremony will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday at the Lee/Jackson Monument at Art Museum and Wyman Park drives.
NEWS
August 25, 2002
THURSDAY, SEPT. 12 6 p.m.-8 p.m.: first showing of Gods and Generals at the Maryland Theater in Hagerstown 8 p.m.-10 p.m.: second showing of Gods and Generals at the Maryland Theater in Hagerstown FRIDAY, SEPT. 13 8 a.m.: site opens to the public with an opening ceremony and raising of the colors 9 a.m.: artillery demonstration 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.: school program 11 a.m.: uniform review, activity tent 1 Noon: children's games, activity tent 2 1 p.m.: Bill Christen speaks on "The 17th Michigan at Fox's Gap," activity tent 1; Civil War Trails opening ceremony 2 p.m.: cavalry demonstration 2:30 p.m.: Steven R. Stotelmyer speaks on "Legends of South Mountain," activity tent 1 3 p.m.: Glenn LeBoeuf speaks on "How to Join the Hobby," activity tent 2 4 p.m.: battle: Fox's Gap 7 p.m. --10 p.m.: dance, featuring the Libby Prison Minstrels, public invited 10 p.m.: site closes SATURDAY, SEPT.
TRAVEL
By Louise Lione and Louise Lione,Special to the Sun | October 3, 1999
Midweek, late summer, it is quiet under the shade of tall, old trees in the Lexington, Va., historic cemetery. It seems only the stern, straight-backed statue of Old Stonewall -- marking his final resting place and appropriately facing south -- stands in the sun.And that is as it should be. This is, after all, Stonewall Jackson Memorial Cemetery. And the oddball Confederate general, one must conclude after even the most desultory wander about town, is Lexington's hero. Never mind that his commander, Robert E. Lee, lies entombed only a few blocks away.
NEWS
By Jacqueline Durett and Jacqueline Durett,Special to the Sun | July 4, 1999
The general without a command -- that was Baltimorean Maj. Gen. Isaac Ridgeway Trimble in July 1863, just before Pickett's Charge.Trimble had ridden with Lee to Gettysburg without any official duties, but after Maj. Gen. William Dorsey Pender's death on the second day of Gettysburg, Trimble, who was still on medical leave from wounds received at the Second Battle ofBull Run, was given command of half of Pender's men -- two brigades from North Carolina.Under...
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