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By Bloomberg Business News | February 12, 1994
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks dropped yesterday amid concern for earnings at companies most sensitive to the economy and the course of interest rates. Auto, chemical and semiconductor issues were among the session's biggest losers.Trading was curtailed as stock exchanges closed 90 minutes early while a fierce snowstorm battered the eastern half of the country."Several important earnings announcements over the past several days have moderately disappointed the most optimistic analysts," said Tom McManus, vice president at Morgan Stanley & Co.General Motors Corp.
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SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2011
To Josh Selby, the Memphis Grizzlies represent a clean slate, and a team that doesn't care about his past, only his potential. To the Memphis Grizzlies — who snagged the Lake Clifton graduate with the 49th pick in Thursday's NBA Draft — Selby represents an investment of minimal risk, but one that still has the potential for a big return. It wasn't a marriage many people saw coming. The Grizzlies never even had Selby in for a workout. "I was very surprised," Selby said. "I didn't have any contact with them [before the draft]
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | February 21, 1996
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks posted their broadest decline in two months yesterday on concern that the Federal Reserve will forgo another interest rate cut.Shares of financial companies dropped and U.S. bonds took their biggest losses since May 1994 after Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan hinted that the central bank might not need to trim borrowing rates soon. Investors had hoped that another cut would revive corporate profit growth and prolong the 14-month rally in stocks.The Dow Jones industrial average dropped 44.79 to 5,458.
SPORTS
March 2, 2011
Jones up, not Mallett Omar Kelly Sun Sentinel Julio Jones' resume at Alabama proved he's the big, tough, physical possession-type receiver. But Jones showed at the NFL combine he's also a speedster, burning up the 40-yard dash with a blazing 4.39 time. And that was before the nation learned Jones did it with a fracture in his foot that will be surgically repaired. Jones' combine showing could be impressive enough to close the gap between him and Georgia's A.J. Green.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | October 22, 1994
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks skidded yesterday for a second day as lingering concern about another interest-rate increase by the Federal Reserve quashed optimism about stronger than expected third-quarter earnings."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | February 28, 1996
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks fell yesterday for a second day, as Micron Technology Inc.'s pessimistic appraisal of the computer-chip industry raised concern that a stagnating economy will hamper corporate profit growth this year.Micron's stock led a retreat in semiconductor shares after the company said it won't finish a new $2.5 billion factory until business picks up. The announcement, which accompanied disappointing profit reports from two big retailers, chilled investors' enthusiasm for stocks.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 21, 1997
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks fell again yesterday after Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan signaled that the central bank is poised to raise interest rates to head off a run-up in inflation.A rebound in computer-related shares such as Sun Microsystems Inc. and Cisco Systems Inc. helped temper the drop in the broad market, and sent the Nasdaq composite index up 9.97 to 1,259.26, its first gain in eight days.The Dow Jones industrial average fell 57.40 to 6,820.28. The 30-stock average has lost 135 points, or 1.9 percent, in three days on concern that interest rates could be headed higher.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 19, 1997
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks fell for a second day yesterday, amid concern that Asia's economic turmoil will slow growth around the world, crimping profits of J. P. Morgan & Co. and other multinational companies.The Dow Jones industrial average fell 110.91 to 7,846.50, its biggest decline in a week. J. P. Morgan led the drop, falling $4.125 to $118.875.The Standard & Poor's 500 index lost 10.24, or 1.1 percent, to 955.30, and the Nasdaq composite index fell 24.18, or 1.6 percent, to 1,523.19.Among other broad market indexes, the Russell 2,000 index of small capitalization stocks lost 6.09 to 420.35; the Wilshire 5,000 index, comprising stocks on the New York, American and Nasdaq stock exchanges, dropped 103.28 to 9,107.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | November 7, 1995
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks fell yesterday, ending a three-day climb to record highs, as investors grew concerned that gains in shares of computer-related companies are leveling off.The decline was sparked early yesterday after Goldman, Sachs & Co. removed technology benchmark Microsoft Corp. from the list of its top recommendations.Computer-guided selling helped push the Dow Jones industrial average to 4,814.01, down 11.56 from Friday's record. The decline came amid a slew of corporate combinations and fueled gains in shares of companies being acquired, including Networth Inc., Federal Paper Board Co. and Pratt & Lambert United Inc.Federal Paper Board soared $6.50, to $52, after International Paper Co., the world's largest forest-products company, said it hadagreed to buy the company for $2.59 billion in cash and stock.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 11, 1999
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks fell on concern that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates more than once in coming months. Three stocks dropped for every one that rose on the New York Stock Exchange, the broadest decline since May.Telecommunications-equipment shares such as Lucent Technologies Inc. led the decline, along with computer-related and financial stocks, and 76 of the 89 industry groups in the Standard & Poor's 500 index tumbled.The Dow Jones industrial average dropped 52.55 to 10,655.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 18, 2006
The tailspin in U.S. stocks continued for a second week as the price of oil jumped to a three-month high and investors prepared for disappointing earnings from banks and technology companies. Financial shares led the retreat after Wells Fargo & Co. and U.S. Bancorp, two of the country's six largest banks, said earnings rose at the slowest pace in four years. Intel Corp., International Business Machines Corp. and Yahoo Inc. dropped after reporting quarterly results. Continental Airlines reported that it lost $43 million, or 53 cents per share, versus $208 million, or $3.16 per share, for the fourth quarter last year.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 27, 2004
NEW YORK - U.S. stocks fell yesterday after a report on new-home sales added to speculation that the Federal Reserve may increase interest rates because of an improving economy. Computer-related stocks led the decline. The Dow Jones industrial average lost 28.11, or 0.3 percent, to 10,444.73, after three consecutive daily gains. The Standard & Poor's 500 index shed 5.07, or 0.5 percent, to 1135.53, its first drop in four days. The Nasdaq composite index fell 13, or 0.6 percent, to 2036.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2001
NEW YORK - Amid fresh reminders that companies are still struggling in a weak economy, investors took profits yesterday, locking in gains after the stock market's two-week rally. Among the big losers were companies that released disappointing earnings and acknowledged future challenges, and companies that were downgraded by brokerages. Analysts had expected a pullback after the Dow industrials and the Nasdaq composite index ended last week with triple-digit advances. "Actually, it is healthy if the market backs and fills, rather than going up like there is no tomorrow," said Dan Ascani, president and research director at Global Market Strategists in Gainesville, Ga. The Dow lost 47.62 to close at 10,532.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 28, 2001
NEW YORK - The Nasdaq composite index tumbled to its lowest close since December 1998 yesterday after reports signaled that the economy is slowing and Goldman Sachs & Co. cut profit forecasts for more than 30 technology companies. Qualcomm Inc., JDS Uniphase Corp. and Cisco Systems Inc. led the Nasdaq decline. EMC Corp., Hewlett-Packard Co. and Applied Micro Circuits Corp., among the stocks whose earnings estimates were cut by Goldman, also fell. The Nasdaq dropped 100.68 to 2,207.82, its lowest close since Dec. 31, 1998, and its first loss in three sessions.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2000
Stocks fell sharply yesterday, led by technology shares, over concerns that recent gains have pushed prices higher than profits would justify and fears that the Federal Reserve will continue to be aggressive in raising interest rates to head off still-invisible inflation. "A continued rise in rates will affect financial prices negatively," said James Hardesty, president of Hardesty Capital Management in Baltimore. "It's occurring now, and, frankly, I'm a bit surprised it did not happen sooner."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 24, 1999
NEW YORK -- Stocks fell yesterday, with the Nasdaq composite index sustaining its worst point loss in more than a month, as investors sold shares to capture profits from the recent rally."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 18, 2006
The tailspin in U.S. stocks continued for a second week as the price of oil jumped to a three-month high and investors prepared for disappointing earnings from banks and technology companies. Financial shares led the retreat after Wells Fargo & Co. and U.S. Bancorp, two of the country's six largest banks, said earnings rose at the slowest pace in four years. Intel Corp., International Business Machines Corp. and Yahoo Inc. dropped after reporting quarterly results. Continental Airlines reported that it lost $43 million, or 53 cents per share, versus $208 million, or $3.16 per share, for the fourth quarter last year.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 24, 1999
NEW YORK -- Stocks fell yesterday, with the Nasdaq composite index sustaining its worst point loss in more than a month, as investors sold shares to capture profits from the recent rally."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 11, 1999
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks fell on concern that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates more than once in coming months. Three stocks dropped for every one that rose on the New York Stock Exchange, the broadest decline since May.Telecommunications-equipment shares such as Lucent Technologies Inc. led the decline, along with computer-related and financial stocks, and 76 of the 89 industry groups in the Standard & Poor's 500 index tumbled.The Dow Jones industrial average dropped 52.55 to 10,655.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 11, 1999
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks fell with bonds yesterday on concern that today's reports on retail sales and wholesale prices will prompt the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates at its meeting at the end of the month.The Dow Jones industrial average recovered 95 points of a 164-point decline in the last half-hour of trading after Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan did not mention interest rates in a commencement speech at Harvard University.The Dow finished down 69.02 to 10,621.27.Computer-related shares such as Microsoft Corp.
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