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BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | July 20, 1995
Recovering somewhat in late afternoon from a 132-point midday plunge, the Dow Jones industrial average yesterday closed down 57.41 points at 4,628.87. High-tech stocks and bonds were especially weak, but brokers reported an absence of panicky individual selling.WALL ST. WISDOM: "Stocks have gone into the 'vertical stage' of this meteoric rise, usually any market's terminal phase. Cautious portfolio managers are being pressured to 'get in' or lose their jobs. That's how legendary investor Bernard Baruch felt in 1929, being totally out of the market when people laughed at him. Then he had the last laugh."
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BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | September 13, 2009
On this day last September, most of us couldn't imagine how bad things were going to get. But the failure of investment bank Lehman Brothers a year ago Tuesday is seen as the catalyst that sent stocks into a free fall that lasted months and wiped out nest eggs. The market appears to have hit bottom in March, with the Dow Jones industrial average rising nearly 47 percent since that low point. We're less afraid to open our 401(k) statements. And many of us are adjusting to the new reality that we will have to work longer, save more and spend less.
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BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS and GAIL MARKSJARVIS,YOUR MONEY | October 28, 2007
If you are afraid of the stock market, you might not like where your money is headed in the company 401(k) plan. But don't fight it. A good dose of stocks, blended together with some bonds in mutual funds, will be good for you - especially if you are years away from retirement and won't panic in a downturn. And the federal government, and your employer, are working to make sure you take your medicine. Last week, the Labor Department set in motion rules that are likely to revolutionize the way millions of Americans save for retirement.
BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis and Gail MarksJarvis,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 27, 2008
Investors actually relaxed a little last week. After a fearful couple of days in markets throughout the world, investors on Wednesday enjoyed the relief of a turnaround of more than 600 points in the Dow Jones industrial average in a day. Suddenly, with stocks down about 20 percent in markets from France to India, the surprise rebound changed analysts' chatter from fear to buying opportunities. It was a reminder to those ready to flee stocks that it is virtually impossible to guess when the market will be cruel or kind to investors.
BUSINESS
By Barbara Demick and Barbara Demick,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 10, 1991
NEW YORK -- For years, even while they were snapping up Japanese electronics and German automobiles, Americans remained downright jingoistic about their investments.Their money stayed close to home -- in U.S. stocks, bonds, certificates of deposit and other instruments.But government and private-industry data show that more capital is leaving the country for investment in foreign stocks and bonds. In the first three quarters of last year, U.S. investors poured $23 billion into foreign stocks and bonds, according to the government.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | April 16, 1999
WOULD YOU like more income? "Our income favorite is Duff & Phelps Utilities Income Fund," says Income Digest."This closed-end fund trades on the NYSE for about $11 a share and yields 7.3 percent. It invests in utility stocks and bonds. Duff & Phelps is a safe haven in a volatile market."QUIZ PROGRAM: "Does your broker know basic information about you?" asks "Big Decisions for Small Investors" by Gordon Williamson.Questions brokers should ask: "What are your present holdings? Do you primarily want growth or income?
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 2, 1998
What mix of stocks and bonds should you own?"People with 15 or more years until retirement should have at least as much in bonds as in stocks," says Charles Clough, Merrill Lynch strategist. "The total return -- yield plus gain -- will be better for bonds than for stocks this year and in 1999."Want to buy the favorite stocks of the top-performing mutual fund managers? The list includes General Motors Corp., Charles Schwab Corp., Family Golf Centers and Storage Technology Corp. (Kiplinger's Magazine.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 18, 1998
From a torrent of 1999 predictions, here is among the best advice: "The big 1999 surprise may come from Japan's stock market. It's crammed with cheap stocks selling at historically low levels." (Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine.)"When stocks decline into early 1999, buy some on dips, but reserve most of your cash for a more robust market." (David Dreman, money manager.)"Negative earnings aren't a good backdrop for absorbing something like President Clinton's impeachment crisis." (John Neff, Wellington Management.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,Chicago Tribune | April 22, 2007
An immediate annuity may not just provide income, it may help portfolios grow more than those without one. Adding an immediate annuity to a retirement portfolio of stocks and bonds improved overall investment returns and lowered risk, a new study shows, but that success depended in large part on finding the right annuity. And that's a tall order for real-world retirees making investment decisions. Unveiling the study last month at an InvestmentNews retirement conference in New York, MassMutual Financial Group officials said they not only confirmed annuities' risk-reduction powers in a portfolio, but also showed that the presence of annuities boosted returns.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | September 13, 2009
On this day last September, most of us couldn't imagine how bad things were going to get. But the failure of investment bank Lehman Brothers a year ago Tuesday is seen as the catalyst that sent stocks into a free fall that lasted months and wiped out nest eggs. The market appears to have hit bottom in March, with the Dow Jones industrial average rising nearly 47 percent since that low point. We're less afraid to open our 401(k) statements. And many of us are adjusting to the new reality that we will have to work longer, save more and spend less.
BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS and GAIL MARKSJARVIS,YOUR MONEY | October 28, 2007
If you are afraid of the stock market, you might not like where your money is headed in the company 401(k) plan. But don't fight it. A good dose of stocks, blended together with some bonds in mutual funds, will be good for you - especially if you are years away from retirement and won't panic in a downturn. And the federal government, and your employer, are working to make sure you take your medicine. Last week, the Labor Department set in motion rules that are likely to revolutionize the way millions of Americans save for retirement.
BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS and GAIL MARKSJARVIS,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 26, 2007
Investors who lost close to half their money in the stock market between 2000 and 2002 are still scarred by the experience. And as the stock market has sunk from its mid-July highs, they have been wrestling with themselves, trying to figure out their next move, given the promises they made to themselves amid the market's fury a few years ago. Many vowed then not to hesitate ever again, but to move quickly out of their stocks and stock funds at the...
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,Chicago Tribune | April 22, 2007
An immediate annuity may not just provide income, it may help portfolios grow more than those without one. Adding an immediate annuity to a retirement portfolio of stocks and bonds improved overall investment returns and lowered risk, a new study shows, but that success depended in large part on finding the right annuity. And that's a tall order for real-world retirees making investment decisions. Unveiling the study last month at an InvestmentNews retirement conference in New York, MassMutual Financial Group officials said they not only confirmed annuities' risk-reduction powers in a portfolio, but also showed that the presence of annuities boosted returns.
NEWS
By Rolfe Winkler | March 8, 2007
Lots of people are asking what's happening to the stock market lately. Are we in for a crash or a protracted bear market? No one, of course, can say for sure. But an understanding of some of the key factors that have driven stock prices up the last few years suggests stocks are headed down from here. An interesting graphic in The Wall Street Journal two weeks ago, right before stocks fell so hard, showed that all of the world's top 20 stock markets were at yearly or all-time highs. Everybody was buying stocks.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE | February 27, 2007
Last year, for the holidays, Anne finally got a computer. Shortly thereafter, she was reading a column online which talked about the historical returns of stocks and bonds, and she printed it to show her husband, Don. Don took the information to heart. Recognizing that a portfolio made up entirely of bonds and bank deposits is not likely to earn as much as a portfolio of stocks over time, he now wants to move all of the couple's liquid assets to stocks. Having reached her 70s without ever having purchased a stock mutual fund, Anne is skeptical.
BUSINESS
By Gail MarksJarvis and Gail MarksJarvis,Tribune Media Services | November 26, 2006
Look at your paycheck, and imagine what it will look like next year, the year after that and maybe in 10, 20 or 30 years into the future. Do you see bonds? Perhaps not, but in essence, that's what you are looking at, said Roger Ibbotson, a Yale economist and founder of the research firm Ibbotson Associates Inc. And if you start thinking of your entire work life, and all the paychecks you'll receive until retirement, as a bond, then it should make it easier to figure out what mixture of stocks and bonds is appropriate for you in your 401(k)
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 29, 1993
NEW YORK -- Stocks closed sharply higher yesterday as Treasury bonds rose for the ninth straight session, dropping yields to another record low.The Dow Jones industrial average soared 39.31 points, or 1.13 percent, to 3,530.20. The Dow is now 0.7 percent below its record closing high of 3,554.83, set May 27.Advancing common stocks on the New York Stock Exchange swamped declining issues by a margin of 13-to-5. Trading was moderately active, with about 242 million shares changing hands.Banking and other financial stocks paced the market's rise, amid expectations that such companies will benefit from lower interest rates.
BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS and GAIL MARKSJARVIS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 18, 2006
What's wrong with cash? Not a thing. If you can't stomach the market's recent plunge, you could move a little money into a high-yielding savings account or money-market fund temporarily and earn close to 5 percent. In fact, some institutions are higher. EverBank of Jacksonville, Fla., offers high-interest checking accounts over the Internet with a 5.5 percent three-month teaser rate, then 3 percent to 4 percent later, depending on the amount kept in the account. Parking money at rates approaching the 5.9 percent historical average on long-term U.S. Treasury bonds certainly has appeal now. Virtually every type of investment, from gold to stocks and bonds, has been pummeled since early May. Gold futures are down about 20 percent, the Dow has lost more than 5 percent, and the average international fund has bled about 13 percent.
BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS and GAIL MARKSJARVIS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 18, 2006
What's wrong with cash? Not a thing. If you can't stomach the market's recent plunge, you could move a little money into a high-yielding savings account or money-market fund temporarily and earn close to 5 percent. In fact, some institutions are higher. EverBank of Jacksonville, Fla., offers high-interest checking accounts over the Internet with a 5.5 percent three-month teaser rate, then 3 percent to 4 percent later, depending on the amount kept in the account. Parking money at rates approaching the 5.9 percent historical average on long-term U.S. Treasury bonds certainly has appeal now. Virtually every type of investment, from gold to stocks and bonds, has been pummeled since early May. Gold futures are down about 20 percent, the Dow has lost more than 5 percent, and the average international fund has bled about 13 percent.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2005
With its endowment growing in size and complexity, the Johns Hopkins University is turning to a former French professor with a knack for investing in more than just stocks and bonds to manage its portfolio. In hiring Kathryn Crecelius, who handled alternative investing for the last seven years at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Hopkins joins a club of schools with the biggest pots of money and lofty ambitions to make more. Hopkins has moved more slowly than some others among the top 25 university endowments in investing in nontraditional areas such as real estate and hedge funds to improve returns.
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