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By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1994
In response to pressure from a state citizens' panel and U.S. Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, the Army says it is considering ways of reducing the risk of a serious accident involving Aberdeen Proving Ground's stockpile of mustard agent.Officials at the Army's Chemical Materiel Destruction Agency said yesterday that they have commissioned a study, to be completed this fall, of whether the 1,500-ton stockpile can be housed in earth-covered bunkers or other structures, or moved farther from an airfield used extensively by the Maryland National Guard.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 30, 2012
Here's an assumption any post-9/11American might make: Someone in a dark room full of computers and video monitors deep inside one of our snoopy federal law enforcement agencies is tracking the purchases of large caches of weapons and ammunition by anyone at any time anywhere in the country, including Anne Arundel County. Isn't that the sort of thing we've been paying for with our federal taxes over the last decade? People who buy explosives for bombs or enough weapons to outfit a small army - they're monitored by someone deep inside the Department of Homeland Security and our vast array of federal agencies, right?
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NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Sun Staff Writer | February 6, 1994
A national panel of experts says chemical treatment of Aberdeen Proving Ground's mustard agent stockpile offers an "attractive alternative" to building a huge, controversial incinerator to dispose of the lethal material.A committee of the National Research Council late Friday issued the strongest endorsement to date of alternatives to burning the obsolete chemical warfare agent stockpiles at Aberdeen and Newport, Ind.The two sites, unlike the six other U.S. stockpiles that must be destroyed by order of Congress, have only bulk chemicals, not the more dangerous and less stable rockets and other munitions filled with mustard and nerve agents.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
Even as Libya's rebels prepare to attack the last remaining strongholds of former dictator Muammar Gadhafi, disturbing reports have surfaced of widespread looting at weapons caches abandoned by his retreating forces. The regime's stockpiles included thousands of portable surface-to-air missiles that terrorists could use to shoot down civilian airliners, as well as chemical warheads containing lethal mustard gas. There's no immediate way of knowing exactly how many weapons have gone missing or where they are now, but it's urgent that the new transitional government and its NATO allies move quickly to secure as many of them as possible before they fall into the wrong hands.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 15, 1993
In 16 concrete bunkers built by the Army for a war with Hirohito and Hitler, the United States has begun assembling about 50 tons of plutonium, a vast stockpile of one of the most expensive materials ever produced and perhaps the most important to safeguard. The Department of Energy says the World War II bunkers, each about the size of a two-car garage, are going to be used for interim storage, meaning six or seven years.But plutonium, which was invented by the Energy Department's predecessor, the Manhattan Project that produced the atomic bomb, may turn out to be the hardest thing on earth to dispose of.And at the Energy Department, "interim" can have an elastic meaning.
NEWS
By Mark Thompson and Mark Thompson,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- It rests in countless vats, vaults and depots across the country, intended to carry the nation through the first three years of a global war.But a look inside the Pentagon's little-known National Defense Stockpile suggests that if World War III breaks out, the U.S. military will be ready to fight World War I all over again. Among its contents:* 150,000 tons of tannin, used in tanning cavalry saddles and knapsacks -- enough, in the words of one top Pentagon official, "to refight the Civil War."
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2002
Harford County residents filled Edgewood Senior Center last night to hear how the Army plans to destroy Aberdeen Proving Ground's 1,621-ton stockpile of mustard agent more than three years ahead of schedule. Some in the crowd of about 160 were APG workers living in nearby communities. Others recalled sitting in similar meetings a decade ago when the Army was proposing to incinerate the toxic material. Noting the risk of terrorism, the Army announced last week that it would speed destruction of the mustard agent, which is about 5 percent of the U.S. military's banned chemical weapons stockpile.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2002
Two surprises awaited the group of Kentucky residents that visited an Aberdeen Proving Ground laboratory to watch workers neutralize toxic mustard agent: They didn't have to wear a gas mask, but they couldn't chew gum. Group members, who live near Blue Grass Army Depot, were at the Harford County military installation for three days last week to meet with representatives from Defense Department programs that oversee the nation's chemical stockpiles and...
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2005
As the last 30 gallons of mustard agent stockpiled for decades at the Aberdeen Proving Ground were dissolved yesterday, so were many of the fears among the people who live nearby. A surplus of more than 1,600 tons of mustard agent - best known for its lethal effects in the trench warfare of World War I - had been stored at the military proving ground in Harford County for more than 60 years. The stockpile, which occasionally leaked, prompted worries among area residents and strident debates about how best to dispose of the chemical warfare material.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2001
Though top health officials are urging people not to stockpile antibiotics, worried Americans are continuing to do just that. Their fears that government supplies might not be mobilized for a large-scale attack is shared by some bioterrorism experts. Reports of an anthrax case in New York yesterday, coming after news coverage about three people exposed in Florida, promise to exacerbate what has been a month-long run on pharmacies. Some drugstores said they were being flooded with a wave of prescriptions for the antibiotic Cipro, a drug used for many common ailments such as urinary tract infections but also for anthrax.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | January 18, 2008
ST. LOUIS -- Listen up, prank callers and party clowns. The nation's supply of helium - the gas that has given rise to millions of party balloons and Donald Duck voices - is dwindling. In fact, the managers of the nation's lone helium reserve, in Texas, expect it to be depleted within 10 years. "It's a bad pun, and I've used it before, but the nation's demand for helium has just ballooned in recent years," said Hans Stuart, a spokesman for the New Mexico Bureau of Land Management, which oversees the federal helium reserve near Amarillo.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2008
Osiris Therapeutics Inc. Shares rose $1.29 to $13.86 after the Columbia-based company said the U.S. government will pay it up to $224.7 million to develop and stockpile its stem cell treatment for radiation exposure.
NEWS
By Michael Hawthorne and Michael Hawthorne,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 27, 2006
While the Bush administration promotes efforts to scrub mercury from the environment, one federal agency is considering plans to sell a huge stockpile of the toxic metal on the world market. The Department of Energy acknowledged last week that it is weighing whether to unload more than 1,300 tons of mercury it collected over the years for processing materials used to make hydrogen bombs. Agency officials started discussing a potential sale after U.S. Sen. Barack Obama, an Illinois Democrat, introduced legislation this summer that would prohibit American exports of the silvery metal.
BUSINESS
By GREGORY KARP and GREGORY KARP,THE MORNING CALL | January 15, 2006
Which is more expensive: a new car or food for a year? Many people would say purchasing a car costs far more, but that's not necessarily true. Even a $25,000 car, with a five-year loan, costs less than $6,000 a year. Yet an average family of four in the United States spends more than $8,000 on food each year, according to the most recent government consumer expenditure figures. So during that five-year period, you would spend about $30,000 on the car purchase and more than $40,000 on food, not even figuring price inflation for food.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 16, 2005
WASHINGTON - The federal government is buying $100 million of avian flu vaccine in the first step toward building a stockpile that would protect 20 million Americans from an outbreak of the deadly virus. Coming weeks after government scientists tentatively concluded that the vaccine works, yesterday's announcement reflects the urgency with which federal health officials are preparing for avian flu's likely spread, a spokesman said. The drug hasn't been approved by federal regulators. But Bill Hall, spokesman for the Department of Health and Human Services, said the danger is too great to wait until testing finishes.
NEWS
By Greg Barrett and Greg Barrett,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2005
Fire Lt. Randall Owens keeps one in the locker at his Rockville station and another in the master bathroom of his Frederick County home. His are two of the 7,000 "bio-packs" of anthrax antidotes given to 3,500 Montgomery County firefighters and police officers. First-responders are given two supplies of doxycycline or ciprofloxacin -- antibiotics used to treat anthrax infections --in clear pouches the size of fanny packs, to keep with them at home and work. In a push to control their own fate, Montgomery County, Baltimore City and other jurisdictions around the country are spending federal homeland security grant money to create stockpiles of antidotes that duplicate drugs readily available through the six-year-old Strategic National Stockpile program, which has cost more than $2 billion to assemble.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Neal Thompson and Susan Baer and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF WRITERS | May 23, 1998
ANNAPOLIS -- Telling the latest class of Navy officers that U.S. vulnerability to new types of terrorism is "real and growing," President Clinton ordered yesterday the stockpiling of vaccines against deadly biological agents and new steps to secure the emerging cyber world."
NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2005
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - The sun has just gone down and the lights at Lowe's Motor Speedway have come up, showcasing more than 150 race cars crowded into the infield. Up in the stands, mixed in with family and fans, will be some of NASCAR's most successful car owners, all of them on the lookout for the next Jeff Gordon or Kurt Busch. On this night, they have come to watch dozens of children ages 8 to 14 roar around a 1/5-mile oval at 80 mph to more than 100 mph. And it doesn't matter that many of the kids can't even touch the pedals of a car on a showroom floor because the newest trend among Nextel Cup car owners is to stockpile talent - even if that means signing youngsters still in middle school.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2005
As the last 30 gallons of mustard agent stockpiled for decades at the Aberdeen Proving Ground were dissolved yesterday, so were many of the fears among the people who live nearby. A surplus of more than 1,600 tons of mustard agent - best known for its lethal effects in the trench warfare of World War I - had been stored at the military proving ground in Harford County for more than 60 years. The stockpile, which occasionally leaked, prompted worries among area residents and strident debates about how best to dispose of the chemical warfare material.
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