Advertisement
HomeCollectionsStockholm
IN THE NEWS

Stockholm

FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | February 17, 2008
My husband and I will be visiting Stockholm, Sweden. Is the city accessible to the disabled? Generally speaking, Stockholm is accessible, from museums and most attractions to many restaurants. But you'll want to avoid parts of Old Town, where streets are cobblestone and many restaurants, in old wine or potato cellars, require walking down stairs. Tina Brannstrom, a spokeswoman for the Stockholm Visitors Board, wrote this in an e-mail: "We have broad sidewalks almost everywhere. The museums are mostly accessible with wheelchairs, like the most popular attractions: the Vasamuseum, Skansen, the Royal Palace (in Old Town)
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
August 11, 2010
Former 400-meter world champion Antonio Pettigrew was found dead Tuesday, the university where he worked as a coach said. Pettigrew, who is survived by his wife and son, had been an assistant track coach at North Carolina for the past four seasons. The 42-year-old Pettigrew, who was stripped of an Olympic gold medal in 2000 after admitting to doping, was found unresponsive by friends in the back seat of his vehicle in Chatham County in central North Carolina early Tuesday.
Advertisement
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1997
Here's something for conspiracy theorizers to consider:The mayor of Baltimore and the governor of Maryland are going to Sweden next week. They're traveling the same day, Aug. 6, and going to the same city, Stockholm. They're even taking the same plane.They say it's just a coincidence.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke is checking out the Water Festival, an extravaganza of musical performances, fireworks, water sports and teen-agers with hair dyed in rainbow colors. He wants to see if a similar event could be staged at the Inner Harbor, possibly by expanding Baltimore's Artscape festival.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | November 11, 2009
Sporting a beard and an old-style swimsuit, Michael Phelps of Baltimore finished third in the 100-meter medley at a World Cup short-course meet in Stockholm, Sweden, after missing out on two other finals Tuesday. Phelps, who won a record eight gold medals at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, swam the medley final in 52.14 seconds. South Africa's Gerhard Zandberg won in 51.77. Earlier Tuesday, Phelps, 24, failed to qualify for the finals of the 100 freestyle and 100 backstroke, in which he was disqualified for swimming too long under water.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Frederick N. Rasmussen | April 27, 1997
A famous ship dripping with irony slipped quietly in and out of Baltimore on Monday in its maiden voyage here.The visitor for less than a day at Pier 5, Dundalk Marine Terminal, was a 15,000-gross- ton passenger vessel called Italia Prima, meaning "Italy First."The ship was in the last stages of an around-the-world tour that began Dec. 21 in Genoa, Italy. Genoa was the home port of Christopher Columbus and another famous 16th-century Italian sailor, Andrea Doria, who won the city freedom from the Spanish.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1999
Ruth Roman, the former sultry star of stage, screen and television who died this month at her California home, found herself caught up in a real-life drama when the grand ocean liner the Andrea Doria collided with the Stockholm off Nantucket, Mass., on July 25, 1956.Roman was returning to New York from Italy aboard the Andrea Doria with her 3 1/2-year-old son, Dickie Hall, and a nurse-companion, Grace Els.While her young son slept in cabin 82 on the Andrea Doria's upper deck with Els, Roman, dressed in an evening gown, had gone to the ship's Belvedere Lounge for a drink and to mingle with other passengers.
NEWS
November 23, 2003
On November 21, 2003, EVA AGNETA "Agge" MITCHELL, born December 1, 1941, native of Stockholm, Sweden; beloved wife of William L. Mitchell; mother of Karin Dodge, of Millersville, MD, Soren Mitchell, of Fairbanks, AK; sister of Soren Lagerberg, of Stockholm, Sweden. Memorial arrangements at Loring Byers Funeral Home to be determined. In lieu of flowers, contributions to the Salvation Army.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1997
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke departed yesterday for Stockholm, Sweden, where he plans to lay the groundwork for a Baltimore bid to play host to the Olympics in 2012.Before leaving, Schmoke said he had set up a meeting with the Sweden Olympic Committee, which is hoping to win the 2004 Summer Games for Stockholm.The chairman of the Maryland Stadium Authority, John A. Moag Jr., will join Schmoke in what the mayor described as an "informal information exchange" on Sweden's experience in navigating the site-selection process.
SPORTS
By Ryan Basen | July 21, 1998
Name: Jesper AntellTeam: SwedenPosition: Midfield/AttackAge: 26Birthplace: StockholmThe skinny: Noticed lacrosse for the first time eight years ago while attending Middlebury High School in Vermont on an exchange program. "It looked like a great sport from the beginning, when I saw a couple kids with sticks throwing a ball around," he said. Antell played at Middlebury that year and joined the Swedish national team the next year, where he has remained. He now plays on the club team FALK and takes law classes at the University of Stockholm.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | August 19, 2006
A large envelope of newspaper clippings arrived this week from Baltimore friends vacationing on Nantucket who are aware of my interest in shipwrecks. Inside were special sections, both excellent, produced by the island's two weekly newspapers, The Inquirer and Mirror and The Nantucket Independent. The sections recall the loss of the Andrea Doria, which sank 50 years ago when it collided with the Swedish liner Stockholm about 50 miles southeast of the island. Late on the evening of July 24, 1956, first-class passengers aboard the Italian Line's 697-foot-long Andrea Doria, were sipping nightcaps and slowly dancing to another rendition of "Arriverderci, Roma" by the ship's orchestra before they retired for the evening.
BUSINESS
By a Baltimore Sun reporter | August 7, 2009
A Maryland developer would abandon plans to build a $250 million sports themed office and recreation park called Gateway South, and Baltimore's only slots casino would be constructed on the land instead if city and state officials approve the change. The Baltimore Development Corp. is drafting a memorandum of understanding that gives control of an 11-acre, city-owned parcel south of M&T Bank Stadium, to Baltimore City Entertainment Group, one of four bidders for slot machine licenses in Maryland and the only group seeking to build a slots facility in downtown.
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | February 17, 2008
My husband and I will be visiting Stockholm, Sweden. Is the city accessible to the disabled? Generally speaking, Stockholm is accessible, from museums and most attractions to many restaurants. But you'll want to avoid parts of Old Town, where streets are cobblestone and many restaurants, in old wine or potato cellars, require walking down stairs. Tina Brannstrom, a spokeswoman for the Stockholm Visitors Board, wrote this in an e-mail: "We have broad sidewalks almost everywhere. The museums are mostly accessible with wheelchairs, like the most popular attractions: the Vasamuseum, Skansen, the Royal Palace (in Old Town)
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | August 19, 2006
A large envelope of newspaper clippings arrived this week from Baltimore friends vacationing on Nantucket who are aware of my interest in shipwrecks. Inside were special sections, both excellent, produced by the island's two weekly newspapers, The Inquirer and Mirror and The Nantucket Independent. The sections recall the loss of the Andrea Doria, which sank 50 years ago when it collided with the Swedish liner Stockholm about 50 miles southeast of the island. Late on the evening of July 24, 1956, first-class passengers aboard the Italian Line's 697-foot-long Andrea Doria, were sipping nightcaps and slowly dancing to another rendition of "Arriverderci, Roma" by the ship's orchestra before they retired for the evening.
NEWS
June 20, 2005
SEVERAL DECADES ago, Swedish investigators made what is now a fairly common observation: Under certain circumstances, the hostage begins to see the world through the eyes of the hostage-taker. Now it looks as though Washington may be in danger of falling into that unfortunate role, with Uzbekistan as the unlikely desperado. It has been more than a month since Uzbek police opened fire on a crowd in the eastern city of Andijan. The official death toll is 176; witnesses believe it was more like 750. The regime of Islam Karimov promptly blamed Islamic terrorists, and said, in the face of considerable evidence to the contrary, that no civilians had been killed by government forces.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2004
STOCKHOLM, Sweden - At 11:20 on the night of Feb. 28, 1986, a gunman approached Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme and his wife, Lisbet, as they walked home after watching a movie in Stockholm and fatally shot the 59-year-old Social Democrat. Nearly 18 years after that brazen assassination shattered Sweden's self-image and set off the biggest murder investigation in the nation's history, Stig Edqvist is still on the case. A veteran of the Swedish National Police, Edqvist directs the 15 detectives still assigned to find Palme's killer.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 15, 2004
STOCKHOLM, Sweden - On the first day of his trial, the confessed killer of Anna Lindh, Sweden's foreign minister, denied yesterday that he had intended to kill her but said he could not ignore voices in his head telling him to attack. Lindh, 46, died of multiple stab wounds one day after she was attacked in a Stockholm department store while shopping Sept. 10. She had no bodyguard with her at the time, and her death stunned a nation that never came to terms with the still-unsolved murder of Prime Minister Olof Palme in 1986.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 11, 2003
STOCKHOLM, Sweden - An unidentified assailant stabbed Foreign Minister Anna Lindh as she shopped in a department store here yesterday afternoon in an attack that stunned many Swedes and rekindled memories of the killing of Prime Minister Olof Palme in 1986. The motive behind the attack was unclear. "It's a serious situation," an emotional Prime Minister Goran Persson said. "The attack on her is an attack on our open society." The police said a tall man wearing a military camouflage jacket lunged at Lindh as she shopped for clothes at a designer outlet in the upscale NK department store in central Stockholm.
NEWS
January 7, 1997
Burton Lane,84, who composed the music for "Finian's Rainbow," "On a Clear Day You Can See Forever" and other stage and movie musicals, died of a stroke Sunday in New York.In a career that extended from Tin Pan Alley to Broadway to Hollywood, Mr. Lane collaborated with such lyricists as Ira Gershwin, E. Y. "Yip" Harburg and Alan Jay Lerner."Finian's Rainbow," a fantasy with a leprechaun, a pot of gold and a bigoted Southern senator, was written with Harburg in 1947.Among the highlights were "How Are Things in Glocca Morra?"
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2003
STOCKHOLM, Sweden - The mighty Swedish warship Vasa was - literally - a total flop on its maiden voyage in 1628. It keeled over and sank in minutes as thousands gathered for the occasion watched in horror. But dredged up more than 300 years later from cold storage on the bottom of Stockholm's harbor, the vessel has enjoyed a remarkable second life as one of the world's great museum pieces. Now the Vasa is under attack from a new enemy. Its ancient oak timbers are literally consuming themselves, being chewed up by sulfuric acid produced by the accidental chemistry of centuries-old sewage and dissolved iron bolts.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2003
STOCKHOLM, Sweden - There were jetloads of flowers, flown to this wintry capital from San Remo, Italy, where Alfred Nobel died on Dec. 10, 1896. There was the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic, playing enough trumpet fanfares for a coronation, which this was, sort of. There were gold medals and royal handshakes for Baltimore's Dr. Peter C. Agre and nine other laureates. And to top off last night's formal award of the 2003 Nobel Prizes for physics, chemistry, medicine, economics and literature, there was the banquet.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.