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By Dan Thanh Dang | June 8, 2008
Watch out for stock traders posing as employees of a made-up Latvian brokerage firm on the popular classifieds Web site Craigslist. The phony firm appears to have stolen personal information from individuals who thought they were applying for a job through Craigslist, according to the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority. A complaint filed by the Securities and Exchange Commission says the traders used the job applicants' Social Security numbers, dates of birth and other information to open up online brokerage accounts.
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NEWS
August 6, 2011
I'm writing in response to the photo of the traders on the stock exchange floor with their heads in their hands ("Summer plunge," Aug. 5). My heart goes out to those little brats in their $3,000 suits . Especially the one with the $10,000 wristwatch. Next time, show a picture of the poor chap sweeping the stock exchange floor who might lose his job. John A. Pica Jr., Baltimore
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BUSINESS
By New York Daily News | March 15, 1991
NEW YORK -- Stock prices made a feverish but failed effort yesterday to extend Wednesday's 32-point gain.The Dow Jones industrial average spent most of the day in plus territory and was up more than 20 points for a while. But the enthusiasm wore off in the last hour, and the index finished down 2.97 at 2952.23.Analysts attributed the late weakness to activity by computer program traders engaged in multiple transactions heading into today's "triple witching hour," which involves the simultaneous expiration of stock index options and futures.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | June 8, 2008
Watch out for stock traders posing as employees of a made-up Latvian brokerage firm on the popular classifieds Web site Craigslist. The phony firm appears to have stolen personal information from individuals who thought they were applying for a job through Craigslist, according to the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority. A complaint filed by the Securities and Exchange Commission says the traders used the job applicants' Social Security numbers, dates of birth and other information to open up online brokerage accounts.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 21, 1994
Yesterday was a baffling day on Wall Street.For months, the stock market has followed the bond market, in lock step, up and down, but mostly down. Yet when bonds rallied yesterday, stocks plunged, as good signals from the bond market alternated with bad signals elsewhere. When stock traders become baffled, they tend to sell.And they sold yesterday in unusually hectic trading. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 21.11 points, to 3,598.71. The broader Standard & Poor's 500-stock index also fell, but less precipitously -- 0.58 point, to 441.96.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service Bloomberg Business News contributed to this article | December 3, 1994
NEW YORK -- Jarred at first by another sign of a strong economy, stock traders did something surprising yesterday: They bid up stock prices for the biggest rally in more than a month.By recent standards, yesterday's employment report ought to have been depressingly healthy, at least for stock and bond traders. The November unemployment rate hit a four-year low as 350,000 jobs were created, news that would normally have sent stocks and bonds falling out of fears of inflation and another move by the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates.
NEWS
August 6, 2011
I'm writing in response to the photo of the traders on the stock exchange floor with their heads in their hands ("Summer plunge," Aug. 5). My heart goes out to those little brats in their $3,000 suits . Especially the one with the $10,000 wristwatch. Next time, show a picture of the poor chap sweeping the stock exchange floor who might lose his job. John A. Pica Jr., Baltimore
NEWS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1999
In the 1600s, the Dutch literally speculated themselves into economic ruin over -- please don't laugh -- tulips.Tulip Mania wasn't the first speculative bubble the world had seen, nor would it be the last. But the flowering inferno was the first capitalist frenzy to be well-chronicled. To this day, the great tulip bubble is invoked by financial gloom-and-doomers whenever euphoric speculators seeking endless riches embrace the belief that their investments can only rise in value -- and never fall.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1994
PHH Corp. announced yesterday a 7 percent increase in third-quarter profits, slightly lower than Wall Street expectations.The Hunt Valley-based company, which provides mortgage banking, vehicle leasing and relocation services, said it earned $15.4 million, or 87 cents a share, during the quarter ended Jan. 31, up from $14.4 million in the same quarter of fiscal 1993.Stock traders responded by pushing PHH shares down 62.5 cents to close at $39.125 a share. Analysts at two Baltimore brokerages said the earnings were slightly below estimates that PHH would earn 89 cents a share.
NEWS
August 12, 1999
ANOTHER SEARING image. More innocents being led from a bloody crime scene. This time it was children at a Jewish Community Center in Los Angeles. Last time, it was office workers in Alabama. The time before that, stock traders in Atlanta.This time -- just like last time and the time before that -- an unstable person had access to a powerful gun.And you can regrettably predict what comes next: The gun lobby repeats that "guns don't kill people, people kill people."Nonsense. You can draw a straight line in logic from the proliferation of guns in this country to the rising tide of senseless violence.
NEWS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1999
In the 1600s, the Dutch literally speculated themselves into economic ruin over -- please don't laugh -- tulips.Tulip Mania wasn't the first speculative bubble the world had seen, nor would it be the last. But the flowering inferno was the first capitalist frenzy to be well-chronicled. To this day, the great tulip bubble is invoked by financial gloom-and-doomers whenever euphoric speculators seeking endless riches embrace the belief that their investments can only rise in value -- and never fall.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service Bloomberg Business News contributed to this article | December 3, 1994
NEW YORK -- Jarred at first by another sign of a strong economy, stock traders did something surprising yesterday: They bid up stock prices for the biggest rally in more than a month.By recent standards, yesterday's employment report ought to have been depressingly healthy, at least for stock and bond traders. The November unemployment rate hit a four-year low as 350,000 jobs were created, news that would normally have sent stocks and bonds falling out of fears of inflation and another move by the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 21, 1994
Yesterday was a baffling day on Wall Street.For months, the stock market has followed the bond market, in lock step, up and down, but mostly down. Yet when bonds rallied yesterday, stocks plunged, as good signals from the bond market alternated with bad signals elsewhere. When stock traders become baffled, they tend to sell.And they sold yesterday in unusually hectic trading. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 21.11 points, to 3,598.71. The broader Standard & Poor's 500-stock index also fell, but less precipitously -- 0.58 point, to 441.96.
BUSINESS
By New York Daily News | March 15, 1991
NEW YORK -- Stock prices made a feverish but failed effort yesterday to extend Wednesday's 32-point gain.The Dow Jones industrial average spent most of the day in plus territory and was up more than 20 points for a while. But the enthusiasm wore off in the last hour, and the index finished down 2.97 at 2952.23.Analysts attributed the late weakness to activity by computer program traders engaged in multiple transactions heading into today's "triple witching hour," which involves the simultaneous expiration of stock index options and futures.
BUSINESS
September 11, 1992
Stock prices little changedThe stock market hovered around yesterday's closing levels in early trading today, pausing after the rally of the past two sessions.The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials was unchanged at 3,305.16 after the first half hour of trading.The day began with some favorable, but expected, news on inflation. The Labor Department reported that the producer price JTC index of finished goods edged up 0.1 percent in August.Analysts said that news reinforced the Street's optimism that inflation remains subdued.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1992
Bell, unions reach local accordBell Atlantic Corp. and two unions representing 52,000 workers have reached agreement on local issues, such as administration of work rules and overtime, completing collective bargaining between the two sides that began almost three months ago. A general settlement on wages and benefits was reached Aug. 23.The new contracts for the Communications Workers of America, which represent 40,000 workers -- about 8,500 in Maryland --...
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